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Thread: Austin Macauley Publishers, Ltd. (formerly Austin & Macauley)

  1. #101
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    what was the update did VRauthor send anyone a copy of the contract?.also note that A&M were this year in Portugal Algarve had a stall at a fair promoting themselves and also VRauthors book. I found reference to it on Facebook. would a publisher pay out expense to go to Portugal to promote themselves.

  2. #102
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    Well this is timely as I have just received (via regular mail - most impressive) a letter asking me to send my ms after responding favorably to my initial submission. I am in a quandary. As a new author I am keen to have anybody read my book and give me feedback. Would it be a mistake to give AM my manuscript and get their opinion, disingenuous though may be, even if I decide not to have them publish it? And also, isn't it better than self publishing (assuming the costs are about the same), in that they have more experience than I have?

  3. #103
    starting over Marian Perera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by silverfro View Post
    As a new author I am keen to have anybody read my book and give me feedback. Would it be a mistake to give AM my manuscript and get their opinion, disingenuous though may be, even if I decide not to have them publish it?
    If you've read examples on the previous page of the kind of slush they print... how valuable could their opinion really be? I mean, if you want someone to read your book and give you feedback, wouldn't a beta reader be better?

    To me, going to a vanity press for manuscript feedback is like going to an escort service to find out if I'm attractive. I seriously doubt the answer I'll get will be either honest or useful.
    Sleeping Beauty-inspired m/m romance : Editing.

  4. #104
    Writer Beware Goddess Absolute Sage victoriastrauss's Avatar
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    They won't give you a real opinion--whatever they tell you will be geared to getting you to buy their services.

    No, it's not better than self-publishing. You can self-publish for free or very little. Even if you hire an editor, cover designer, and so on, you'll pay much less than you will to Austin Macauley, and keep much more control of your work and your income.

    - Victoria

  5. #105
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    Question Copy of A&M Contract

    I have seen a copy of a contract it has 25 sections note this is a self publishing contract section 15 asks you to tick one of 3 boxes 1/ 1150 E-Book Edition only 2/ 2300 Paper Back & E-Book Edition 3/ 3300 Hard Back & Paperback including E-Book Edition.also section 16 Royalties quotes all sales on the above is 20% of net sales.
    I also know that they do publish works that take no payment,but how do you know how many books are sold
    Last edited by tightbinding; 03-15-2014 at 01:52 AM.

  6. #106
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    your manuscript

    Quote Originally Posted by silverfro View Post
    Well this is timely as I have just received (via regular mail - most impressive) a letter asking me to send my ms after responding favorably to my initial submission. I am in a quandary. As a new author I am keen to have anybody read my book and give me feedback. Would it be a mistake to give AM my manuscript and get their opinion, disingenuous though may be, even if I decide not to have them publish it? And also, isn't it better than self publishing (assuming the costs are about the same), in that they have more experience than I have?
    many different views on this company they have had much bad reviews, but nothing has ever been in the press. also they have been going for some time, I have checked with companies house in the UK which anyone can do and they have never been dissolved or insolvent, in nearly 10 years so that has to say something, yes they are also know for taking self publishing and pricing can be in 3 categories. if you check many companies who offer proof reading they charge up to $5-6 per page so a 300 page book can cost $1500, A&M seem to be priced in the normal price category along with many other companies. I also know for a fact they do also take on new authors with no charge and in return you get 20% of sales. over the year A&M have appeared in google search for reviews most are by disgruntled authors who thought they would get rich by paying to have a book published, I can not find one court case against this publisher and think you should make up your own mind as to what you should do. yes it is safe to send a MS as it can be easy to prove it was your work you sent them, you would have to be pretty stupid to try and steal someones work as it would finish them overnight. I have seen many publishers come and go. how many of these forums have well known authors singing the praise on their publisher. hmmmm

  7. #107
    Outside the box, with the bunnehz KimJo's Avatar
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    It isn't a "self-publishing" contract. It's a vanity publishing contract. Self-publishing means the author is publishing their own work; the only contracts involved in that situation are contracts the author may have with freelance editors, cover designers, etc. If a company calling itself a publishing company is soliciting money from an author in order to produce a book, and that book identifies the company as the publisher, it's vanity publishing.

    And books from this company identify Austin Macauley as the publisher; I had to have a Goodreads librarian friend remove one of their picture books from my author page, as the author had the same name as my young adult pen name (Jo Ramsey), and someone had set that book as one of mine. I'd like to think it was an honest mistake on the part of a reader, and not the publisher (who should have known their author hadn't written all the other books on my author page) or author doing something hinky.

  8. #108
    Writer Beware Goddess Absolute Sage victoriastrauss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tightbinding View Post
    I also know that they do publish works that take no payment
    They say they do. But I've never seen any proof of that, or anything to suggest the claim is anything but a marketing ploy.

    - Victoria

  9. #109
    starting over Marian Perera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tightbinding View Post
    I have checked with companies house in the UK which anyone can do and they have never been dissolved or insolvent, in nearly 10 years so that has to say something
    If you feel this makes them the best publisher for you, then go for it. Best of luck.

    how many of these forums have well known authors singing the praise on their publisher. hmmmm
    I'm not sure what this has to do with discussions of publishers, but once you become a well known author with Austin Macauley, you can come back and let us know.
    Last edited by Marian Perera; 03-15-2014 at 04:11 AM.
    Sleeping Beauty-inspired m/m romance : Editing.

  10. #110
    Writer Beware Goddess Absolute Sage victoriastrauss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimJo View Post
    Self-publishing means the author is publishing their own work; the only contracts involved in that situation are contracts the author may have with freelance editors, cover designers, etc.
    That's really only true if you don't self-publish through a platform or service. Even the free platforms, such as CreateSpace and KDP and Smashwords, require you to accept a set of Terms and Conditions that require warranties and a grant of rights, and give the platform a degree of control over your work.

    - Victoria

  11. #111
    Outside the box, with the bunnehz KimJo's Avatar
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    Thanks for clarifying, Victoria. I think I was mentally including the terms and services agreements with distributors/platforms as part of the "etc." in my post. (I know I was thinking of those...But then again, writer... readers can't read my mind, only my words )

  12. #112
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    provoking

    Quote Originally Posted by Queen of Swords View Post
    If you feel this makes them the best publisher for you, then go for it. Best of luck.

    I'm not sure what this has to do with discussions of publishers, but once you become a well known author with Austin Macauley, you can come back and let us know.
    Hi, I was not singing the praise of A&M as I do not know them or ever worked with them. I do know someone who self published or vanity published not sure what, with them and have got a copy of their contract. my quote:how many of these forums have well known authors singing the praise on their publisher. hmmmm
    was really just stating that not many success stories appear, and now after reading the great article by http://amberskyeforbes.wordpress.com...shing-presses/
    it has opened my eyes to the comment I made as it could have easily fit in to this type of category. I am a newbie to this and I just find for most new authors good advice can be had on forums like this or like me go and buy the
    ( Writers' & artists' yearbook) full of great practical advice and tips. :-)
    Last edited by tightbinding; 03-16-2014 at 01:28 AM.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by victoriastrauss View Post
    That's really only true if you don't self-publish through a platform or service. Even the free platforms, such as CreateSpace and KDP and Smashwords, require you to accept a set of Terms and Conditions that require warranties and a grant of rights, and give the platform a degree of control over your work.

    - Victoria
    It would seem you are very knowledgeable Victoria, I just finished reading Jerrod Balzer's article Gross Vs Nett. and it covers smaller publishers I did look at a couple of books published by A&M, and ask could you explain how do they get the books into large retailers as I noted one large well known UK book shop WHSmiths. is it because they produce volume or should I read Jerrods article with a pinch of salt??
    I do not doubt for one minute that A&M asks Authors for money as I have seen and got a copy of a contract so know for sure they do practice this. but if they can get books in well known stores it that good or bad or are the books never on the shelve and print to order? the reason I ask as when getting reject letters I can see how people can turn to publishers like these. I am just about to send of a covering letter to around 20 publishers and will wait and see what happens, one thing is for sure I will not be paying to have my work published as I would feel I am lying to myself. very please I found this forum.

  14. #114
    Writer Beware Goddess Absolute Sage victoriastrauss's Avatar
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    I'm sure AM books are listed on multiple retailers' websites--getting your book listed on a retailer's website is extremely easy--but it's very unlikely you'd ever find an AM book on an actual bookshop shelf (and if you did, likely it was the author who begged the bookshop manager to put it there). Companies like AM have very, very limited distribution--they have the kind that makes books available online, but not the kind that gets books into physical shops.

    They also don't do any meaningful publicity or marketing, so any promotion is entirely up to the author. Basically, it's exactly like self-publishing, except it costs a fortune and you're sold a line of crap about what they can and will do for you.

    I read Balzer's article, which I hadn't seen before. I don't want to get into a big argument, but he's really off the beam on a number of things. He's not talking about net royalties at all (the publisher's net income--list price less discounts and channel fees), he's talking about net profit royalties (the publisher's net income less production and sometimes other costs). That's a whole different animal. He also assumes "gross" royalties for ebooks will be no higher than 15%, while most independent epublishers pay 30% or even more; and he assumes that most sales will be print, which I suspect isn't true for most digital small presses.

    Net profit royalties are a sleazy way for amateur or exploitive publishers to make authors think they're partners ("shared risk") while paying them the absolute least amount they can. It's not the author's job to assume the publisher's risk, or the author's duty to accept less pay in order to keep the publisher afloat.

    - Victoria

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by victoriastrauss View Post
    I'm sure AM books are listed on multiple retailers' websites--getting your book listed on a retailer's website is extremely easy--but it's very unlikely you'd ever find an AM book on an actual bookshop shelf (and if you did, likely it was the author who begged the bookshop manager to put it there). Companies like AM have very, very limited distribution--they have the kind that makes books available online, but not the kind that gets books into physical shops.

    They also don't do any meaningful publicity or marketing, so any promotion is entirely up to the author. Basically, it's exactly like self-publishing, except it costs a fortune and you're sold a line of crap about what they can and will do for you.

    I read Balzer's article, which I hadn't seen before. I don't want to get into a big argument, but he's really off the beam on a number of things. He's not talking about net royalties at all (the publisher's net income--list price less discounts and channel fees), he's talking about net profit royalties (the publisher's net income less production and sometimes other costs). That's a whole different animal. He also assumes "gross" royalties for ebooks will be no higher than 15%, while most independent epublishers pay 30% or even more; and he assumes that most sales will be print, which I suspect isn't true for most digital small presses.

    Net profit royalties are a sleazy way for amateur or exploitive publishers to make authors think they're partners ("shared risk") while paying them the absolute least amount they can. It's not the author's job to assume the publisher's risk, or the author's duty to accept less pay in order to keep the publisher afloat.

    - Victoria
    Thank you so much for setting me straight, now you point it out like that yes it is a bit sleazy way to make an author think they are partners in the profit. I did see many photos of authors in Waterstones stores doing a book signing and they all seem to be posted by A&M in pinerest they even post photos of the Frankfurt book fair but they were not listed as stand exhibitors.

  16. #116
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    Hello all.
    I don't know if anyone has brought this up before.... but does anyone know how Austin Macauley actually publish and market their ebooks?
    Well I just found out, quite by accident. On Smashwords, that is where. I repeat... Smashwords.

    https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/austinmacauley

    There you go. They want to charge you for something you can do for free yourself. I had an offer from them, it didn't excite me.

  17. #117
    Writer Beware Goddess Absolute Sage victoriastrauss's Avatar
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    Not to defend Austin Macauley, but Smashwords is a distributor as well as a self-publishing platform. A lot of publishers distribute through them.

    - Victoria

  18. #118
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    Interesting...

    The threads are all interesting. I have been debating whether to submit my work to the Austin Macauley Publishers or not; however, it seems like more bad news than good news exists! I did see they are also attending the London Book Fair this year categorised under Services to the publishing industry - Author Services. Is this a collective meaning for vanity?

    Help appreciated, all!

  19. #119
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    Pretty much, yes.

    You can self-publish your book for a lot less than Austin Macauley will charge you, and you'll earn more from its sales as a result. I don't see the benefit in using them at all.

  20. #120
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    re your link

    Quote Originally Posted by spooner248 View Post
    Hello all.
    I don't know if anyone has brought this up before.... but does anyone know how Austin Macauley actually publish and market their ebooks?
    Well I just found out, quite by accident. On Smashwords, that is where. I repeat... Smashwords.

    https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/austinmacauley

    There you go. They want to charge you for something you can do for free yourself. I had an offer from them, it didn't excite me.
    I did take a look at the link and must say most of the artwork for the covers look very poor and amateurish not sure if others agree with me,but they don't give the impression to go and buy the books offered, is that the tell tell sign of self publishers??

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by tightbinding View Post
    I did take a look at the link and must say most of the artwork for the covers look very poor and amateurish not sure if others agree with me,but they don't give the impression to go and buy the books offered, is that the tell tell sign of self publishers??
    No, it's not a "tell tell sign of self publishers??", it's just the quality of the covers of books published by Austin Macauley.

    If you publish through Austin Macauley you have not self published, you have vanity published.

  22. #122
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    I've looking into more depth about Austin Macauley Publishers and the World Book Fair. I am interested and somewhat astounded by an answer they have given in a '5 minutes with Austin Macauley' interview with the London Book Fair.

    Article here: http://www.londonbookfair.co.uk/en/L...stin-Macauley/

    Question: "Go on...tell us your guilty pleasure from the world of fiction?"

    Answer: "European crime literature not written by Scandinavians."

    I'm not sure what to think about this team members answer.

    1. Isn't the genre typically counted as "Scandi Noir"

    2. After reviewing the online catalogue, it appears they have four books under the genre this member of staff has admitted their guilty pleasure (and dislike) about.

    3. The sentence seems to be quite appallingly answered.

    I have decided to submit to Austin Macauley and report back on my progress with them. Here is hoping I get one of the illusive contracts without being charged!

    Did the author ever come back about this contract the free contract they received in the end?

  23. #123
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    Don't bother submitting.

    Even if they do offer you a trade contract--which they won't--they don't have distribution, so they don't have the ability to sell your book effectively. You can do better self-publishing.

  24. #124
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    So, I have received my offer for a publishing agreement. Easier to say a 4 figure sum to publish with Austin Macauley. It seems as if only one person on here has managed to obtain a publishing agreement without fee.

    After looking through a couple of pages on Google, they are advertising for an Editorial Position in Ely. Link: http://yojob.co.uk/jobs/editorial-as...ampaign=jooble

    Are they actually in London? Has anybody met them?

  25. #125
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    Artemis Publishers

    Quote Originally Posted by MickRooney View Post
    I've been looking at this company for quite a while. They are all part of the same paid publishing cartel. Austin & MacAuley, Pegasus Elliot MacKenzie, Ashwell Publishers, Olympia Publishers and Artemis Publishers are all linked through the ownership and directorship of one family in the Cambridge, England area. All of them are involved in paid publishing models under the guise of 'Traditional Publishing'.

    Olympia declare its part of Ashwell Publishing, which in turn shares director(s) running the other companies from the same family (father and sons). Over time, they have operated 'virtual offices' in the London and Cambridge areas, but actually use warehouse offices near Witchford, Cambridgeshire. Prospective authors, requesting meetings, are taken to plush offices, borrowed or rented for the day, (or hotels) in Cambridge and London to present the illusion that the companies are based there.
    From the Artemis Publishers website:

    Bloomsbury is renowned as a writers haven situated, as it is, next to the internationally famous British Library and within easy reach of the centre of one of the most inspiring Cities in the world, London. It is here that Artemis was established in order to be within an environment which is also near to every writers heart. The Company was set up with skilled partners from the publishing industry who wanted to give authors the opportunity to be able to deal directly with a publisher and avoid the frustration of finding themselves an agent.
    http://www.artemispublishers.com/about_us.php
    What's their address?

    Artemis Publishers Limited
    Hamilton House,
    Mabledon Place,
    Bloomsbury,
    London,
    WC1H 9BB
    http://www.artemispublishers.com/contact_us.php
    It sounds very impressive, but Artemis isn't 'established' there. From the Hamilton House website:

    Located off Euston Road, we’re a spacious venue offering a perfect setting for corporate and private events from 2 to 200 people...Our rooms are spread over two floors. With 11 meeting rooms and 1 large conference hall available at Hamilton House there should be something to suit everyone.
    http://hamilton-house.org.uk/
    One wonders how many authors have been fooled into thinking that Artemis actually rents office space in this imposing building.
    Last edited by aliceshortcake; 06-13-2014 at 02:44 PM.

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