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Thread: LBF Books / Letís Be Frank Publishing

  1. #1
    Terra Aeterna
    Guest

    LBF Books / Letís Be Frank Publishing

    LBF Books (aka Letís Be Frank Publishing) Has anyone heard anything about:

    www.lbfbooks.com/

    They look a little peculiar to me. Am I just mega-paranoid? They're not on P & E. (Yet).
    Last edited by James D. Macdonald; 07-13-2005 at 03:19 PM. Reason: Changed title

  2. #2
    tfdswift
    Guest

    Re: lbfbooks

    Why are you suspicious?

    It does sound a little too good? But I don't know anything. I am just curious why YOU think it sounds suspicious, as I am still learning about this industry and a willing student am I.:hail

  3. #3
    CaoPaux
    Guest

    Re: lbfbooks

    Their "levels" do seem odd. To me, it indicates they'll accept books that they don't consider worth their full effort. Ick.

  4. #4
    vstrauss
    Guest

    Re: lbfbooks

    Not to sound cynical or anything, but I've never yet seen a publishing operation that offered different "levels" that didn't extract a fee of some sort. Either that, or these people are severely clueless.

    - Victoria

  5. #5
    maestrowork
    Guest

    Re: lbfbooks

    I know the people who are running LBF Books. They DO NOT charge any fees and is positioning themselves as traditional (not self-publishing, Vanity, POD, etc.) They are very new, and probably a little clueless at this point. But they are legit. They currently publish a monthly journal (and yes, it's a paying market, albeit very small amount). They have scheduled their first book releases this fall.

    However, they're probably not your best bet since they're so new and small.

    The way I understand it: they're doing the level approach and using POD printing technology to cut down cost and risks. They're very small (did I mention that?) and do not have the $$$ established publishers have. But they're not vanity like Publish America or iUniverse and there are no fees/costs. They go through the same traditional publishing process and there are no fees on the author's part. Now, I've never seen their contracts so I don't know if they're fair.

  6. #6
    Terra Aeterna
    Guest

    Re: lbfbooks

    Thanks y'all.

  7. #7
    tfdswift
    Guest

    Re: lbfbooks

    I have just been approached by lbf books... I don't know what to do next...

    ~~Tammy

  8. #8
    tfdswift
    Guest

    HELP needed!!!!

    I have been approached by LBF Books.... They want to see my whole manuscript.... What do I do? Do I trust them?

    My mentor, who I would normally turn to, is out of town for awhile:smack ... I need some guidance here.... I am open to suggestions... Anybody????:huh (desparation is setting in) (will Tammy have a nervous breakdown?)

    ~~Tammy

  9. #9
    Editrx
    Guest

    Re: lbfbooks

    If they are that small and are using POD technology to "cut down on costs" (POD breakpoint is 300-500 copies, depending on the printer you use -- I just had to do a breakdown last week for some ARCs, so I know of what I speak), I'd be very concerned that they didn't have proper or adequate distribution.

    I haven't gone to look at their site due to time constraints. What do they say is their distribution scheme?

  10. #10
    DaveKuzminski
    Guest

    Re: HELP needed!!!!

    By approached, what do you mean?

    If you mean that you did not contact them first and they contacted you, then be suspicious. Most publishers have more than enough submissions to keep them busy. They don't need to approach anyone who isn't famous or well known already.

    If you contacted them and they asked to see what you have, then you should trust them. That's how the process works.

  11. #11
    tfdswift
    Guest

    Re: HELP needed!!!!

    No, I did contact them first but I never expected to hear from them so soon. I am just a little wary because of other posts on this board. I will send them the manuscript unless someone comes on and gives me a reason not to while I am doing the final edit.

    Thanks,
    ~~Tammy:thumbs

  12. #12
    mammamaia
    Guest

    looks more'n a bit fishy, t'me...

    1.
    in their 'publishing with us' they brag that 'Unlike some,' they don't charge you anything...

    2.
    there's no mention of what YOU get paid, when and if they actually print your book and put it out there for sale...

    3.
    nowhere else on their site can i find any mention of what the author is paid or when... and no sample contract to check for hidden snags...

    if all you want is to see your work in tangible book form, this may be an ok way to do it... but it will NOT make you a 'published' author if this is just another variation on the vanity press/pod scheme, as it seems to be...

    to be 'published' you must be PAID for your book, not give it to someone for free, just to get it printed... that's how to tell a real publisher from a scam or vanity press...

    have you checked this bunch out at preditors and editors?... or at writer beware?... if not, i suggest you do, before sending them anything...

    love and hugs, maia

  13. #13
    mammamaia
    Guest

    i just checked their site...

    and it doesn't look all that good to me...

    tdswift, see my reply to your other post on this... i wouldn't advise doing business with folks who seem to have so little knowledge of the publishing business themselves... and it won't make you 'published' if they're not a regular royalty-paying house, that markets and distributes to real bookstores...

    hugs, maia

  14. #14
    tfdswift
    Guest

    Re: looks more'n a bit fishy, t'me...

    Maestro says they are a traditional publisher yet new. They are not listed with P&E, nor could I find them on Writers Beware. I, too, could not find a publishing agreement or any place that mentioned what they pay other than they said that payment depended on the work itself.

    Even the guy from P&E (sorry I can't remember your name off the top of my head) said I should trust them. I personally was thinking I would go ahead and send the manuscript and let them read it and then see what they offer IF they want to publish it. I have learned that I should always get paid and I should never pay a fee.

    So everything should be okay, unless I sign something and I don't plan on doing THAT until I have read the offer and looked carefully at the small print. I do have a paralegal degree and I know a thing or two about reading contracts but still I would never sign unless my mentor or some other qualified person told me I should.

    Do you think that is a fair approach??? Anyone????

    <Tammy waits patiently.... tapping her fingers on the computer....> lol

    ~~Tammy

  15. #15
    vstrauss
    Guest

    Re: looks more'n a bit fishy, t'me...

    I think they may be well-intentioned. But I have to say they look amateurish to me, based on their webiste. Hbbyist publishers often aren't able to market or distribute (let alone edit or design) their books.

    Also, it's wise just as a general rule of thumb to wait until a publisher has been in business for a year or two, and has proved it can take books all the way through the production process (this also allows you to assess the books' physical quality and how successful the publisher is at things like getting reviews and getting books into stores). Many small publishers bite off more than they can chew and go belly-up without ever publishing any books--which can be very inconvenient for the writers, rightswise.

    >>I do have a paralegal degree and I know a thing or two about reading contracts<<

    Publishing contracts in a class by themselves--they have clauses that don't occur in any other kind of contracts. You need specialized knowledge in order to be able to properly evaluate a publishing contract.

    - Victoria

  16. #16
    DaveKuzminski
    Guest

    Re: looks more'n a bit fishy, t'me...

    My advice is, of course, based upon the premise that you're only letting them consider your manuscript. Until you sign a contract, you're under no obligation to them. If they accept your manuscript, you're still under no obligation. At that point, it's up to you based upon what they offer in the contract they offer at that point. Basically, that's when you will know whether you want to deal with them.

    So long as they don't have an exclusive, you can submit to other publishers as well.

    So far, I don't have any complaints about that publisher. Nor do I have any other information to really go on.

  17. #17
    tfdswift
    Guest

    Re: looks more'n a bit fishy, t'me...

    QUOTE:

    "Also, it's wise just as a general rule of thumb to wait until a publisher has been in business for a year or two, and has proved it can take books all the way through the production process (this also allows you to assess the books' physical quality and how successful the publisher is at things like getting reviews and getting books into stores). "

    __________________________________________________ __

    How can they get books published and prove themselves if they don't get books submitted to them?

    Everbody has to start somewhere... me included.

    Also the comment about being a paralegal, I also said I would not sign a thing unless my mentor or some other authority on the subject told me I should do so. Believe me I am walking on the cautious side. After what happened to me with Janet Kay, I am now a big wimp.

    ~~Tammy

  18. #18
    vstrauss
    Guest

    Re: looks more'n a bit fishy, t'me...

    >>How can they get books published and prove themselves if they don't get books submitted to them?<<

    There's never a shortage of people to submit books, even to the worst and most amateurish-seeming of publishers. That doesn't mean you have to submit.

    I wouldn't hesitate to submit to a new publisher that was staffed by people with lots of previous professional publishing experience, even if that publisher had no books out yet. But I'd definitely hold off on a publisher whose staff was inexperienced, because publishers like this so frequently fail--and even when they limp on for a while, don't do their authors any favors, because they so rarely have any notion of how to market and distribute. The Internet is crawling with publishers like this, and more of them pop up every day. IMO, you're better off with a decent fee-based POD--you'll get about the same level of service, possibly a better-looking cover, and you can be reasonably sure the company will still be there a year from now.

    Probably this sounds horribly snobbish and elitist. It isn't meant to be, really. It's just based on a lot of observation of Internet-based publishers.

    - Victoria

  19. #19
    tfdswift
    Guest

    Re: looks more'n a bit fishy, t'me...

    I appreciate any advice right now. I think I will hold off for a few days until my mentor gets back and see what they think. I thought it would be harmless to submit, and only detrimental if I signed a bad contract. See, I am listening and always willing to learn.:grin :hail

    Thanks for taking the time to give your opinion.:hug

    ~~Tammy

  20. #20
    Whachawant
    Guest

    Re:checked their site....matter of fact I work for them..

    There is nothing wrong with LBF BOOKS... yes they are a small company.. but anybody doing any type of business.. starts out small... The editor is a published author. The VP is a published and world renowned artist.. the Art director for Opinions magazine is another world renowned Artist..
    All of which have assisted me in getting my career choice a boost.
    Hey Editrix... they use LuLu.com.. which offers ISBN numbers and does not stop at a publication of 500 / nor does Authorhouse.com. LuLu offers packages to those on a budget ,.. including corporations. Considering Writers Post Journal has consecutively been in the top 200 of their magazine sales I say they're pretty legit. I work with a Childrens writer whose in the 1000 and we all get respectable sales..

    Oh and to mammamia.. get with the 21st century.. times are difficult cause competition has increased at least 5 times.. exposure and publication is important to Artists whether written or visual. Ya gotta start somewhere. Proving you can deliver is what these small magazines and ezines offer as well as free exposure. ..

    So why don't all of you nay sayers .. give this one a shot .. ya might be surprised.

    ........:head

    "..Experience is the only true knowledge".. Albert Einstein

  21. #21
    XThe NavigatorX
    Guest

    Re: Re:checked their site....matter of fact I work for them.

    *son of a b*tch*

    I typed a long-ass response to this and ended up with "Html comments aren't allowed." I didn't put any friggin' html in here! roooooaaaar @ ezboard

  22. #22
    XThe NavigatorX
    Guest

    Re: Re:checked their site....matter of fact I work for them.

    okay... here's a condensed version. The original was about 500 words.

    Lulu = good choice for individuals who must vanity POD

    Lulu = horrible choice for publishers.

    isbn service through lulu = Lightning Source

    SO you have author -> LBF -> Lulu -> Lighting Source -> Amazon/Ingram/etc.-> consumer = A very expensive book w/tiny profit for author.

    Silver Level on LBF site = Lulu's free service, which means LBF has no vested interest in book doing well.

  23. #23
    Risseybug
    Guest

    Re: Re:checked their site....matter of fact I work for them.

    I looked over this site. And, actually, it looks like they have a good start. The "levels" to which everyone was referring, seem to be their way to protect themselves. The "silver" is the newbie book, after six months a "gold" book is one they promote more actively, and if your book is received well, you get the "platinum" treatment, meaning they print you in hardback. Which, let's face it, is rather expensive for a book that hasn't sold anything.

    I would want to know how much a book would cost if I purchased it from Amazon or B&N, which, BTW, is misspelled on the site. It's the NOBEL peace price, the bookstore is Barnes and NOBLE. Or Chernobyl, if you are my aunt and think that's funny.

    If the books wouldn't have an outrageous cover price, this little press actually sounds like a good deal.
    Perhaps Dave or Uncle Jim can take a look see and give us their opinion.

    Because we bow to their magnamimousness. Or something.

  24. #24
    Whachawant
    Guest

    for crying out loud

    Look ....we all crawled before we could walk ..... thats what this company is doing and thats what it offers ...

    there are quite a few publications that offer the same thing that are underground and I don't here you guys complaining about them ...

    so ... Like I said before ...It's important for artists .." written or visual to get published"...be it small time or big time ...and that 's what this company advertises if you're up to there standards ....

    Keep in mind if everybody submits ...chances are there are going to be some people who will be rejected...

    As with the so called big time publications.....
    and what the hell do they know..
    they turned down Julia Child, Stephen King, and at one point in time ...... Alfred Hitchcock...
    so .....shut up and take one step at a time... whether it be lulu... or an ezine........


    :head

  25. #25
    emeraldcite
    Guest

    Re: for crying out loud

    one thing upstart companies often forget is that professionalism, above all else, sells...

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