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Thread: Useful Research Links

  1. #26

  2. #27
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    Names:

    Behindthename.com and surname.behindthename.com

    Mostly Euro-centric names.

  3. #28
    Critical reader
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    Lions and tigers and bears...oh my!

    Useful info on various predators (the wild critter kind) that can be found in the United States:

    Predator biology

    In case your tale is set in the wilderness!

  4. #29
    practical experience, FTW dreamcatcher's Avatar
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    Psychology for fiction writers:

    archetypewriting.com

  5. #30
    Dead. Snitchcat's Avatar
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    The other side of Hong Kong, the tourist destination (aptly named blog post!):

    http://www.theasiamag.com/places/hon...mansions-hotel
    -----------------------
    Soft toys. That is all.
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    Blog: Dreams of a Broken Phoenix
    Patreon: Tiny Carriers of Light
    FB "blog": Depression in Hong Kong
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    Dare you to click:

  6. #31
    It must be Thursday. UrbanAmazon's Avatar
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    I've found this site not only useful for fact-checking, but also for just browsing through to find inspiration in the weird and wonderful - http://atlasobscura.com/ Atlas Obscura, as they call it, is a compendium of strange, mysterious, delightful, or downright creepy places around the world, showcasing both natural and man-made locations, modern and ancient. Most listings include photographs, details on how to access or visit each spot, and a Google Maps location.

    Anyone looking for any post-apocalyptic potential settings or abandoned military bases might be able to use this article as a starting point - http://www.cracked.com/article_19449...-are-real.html Photos and reference links through the article.

    In fact, I'd like to recommend http://www.cracked.com overall, though I find it usually functions best as a starting point for research, not a source on its own. Common topics or lists have included military history and heroism, nature, weird science, and pop culture. They tend to link to their sources and other references, though the language gets more than a little profane and they do tend to be biased toward sensationalism. (Complete understanding if you determine that this would be better listed elsewhere.)

  7. #32
    <insert witty title here> ShannonR.'s Avatar
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    I know this is an old thread, but here are some sites I've found informative:

    Religion, Sociology
    www.Religioustolerance.org-ReligiousTolerance.org, with information about basically every religion, practice or belief out there. Also a lot of information about the various conflicts that have gone on in the name of religion, urban legends, news items, etc.

    Beliefnet.com-
    Beliefnet, forums about pretty much everything, as well as articles about religion, spirituality, politics and other things.

    About.com has articles about pretty much any subject you can think of, written by people who know what they're talking about.

  8. #33
    figuring it all out Seth?'s Avatar
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    There is a podcast by howstuffworks.com called Stuff You Should Know that I find really, really insightful in regards to research (and just for fun. )

    I would suggest it to anybody. They have like over 400 podcasts on a ton of different stuff. I've used organ donation, gender reassignment, Japanese stragglers and a plethora of others for my writing.

    There are also a couple other podcasts that have proven helpful by hsw: Stuff You Missed in History Class, TechStuff, Stuff Mom Never Told you, Stuff From the B-side... All of them are awesome IMO.

    Hope some of you find any of these helpful!


    -Seth

  9. #34
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    For crime writers this may be a help when MC interviewing suspects and trying to determine if lying.

    http://www.humanliedetection.com/

    Regards
    GJ

  10. #35
    practical experience, FTW
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    Here's something that'll help you if you're writing about a character with an accent and need to have an idea of what he/she sounds like: http://accent.gmu.edu/

  11. #36
    Willing to Learn MythMonger's Avatar
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    Every college football game ever played:

    http://cfbdatawarehouse.com/index.php

  12. #37
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin Xothian Star-Spawn's Avatar
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    11 simple guidelines to keep fictional ecosystems plausible and consistent:

    http://hollylisle.com/worldbuilding-...of-ecosystems/

  13. #38
    practical experience, FTW snafu1056's Avatar
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    Assorted bits n pieces:

    Dictionary of medieval Russian names
    http://heraldry.sca.org/names/paul/

    Vocabulum or, The Rogue's lexicon: Dictionary of mid 19th century New York criminal slang
    http://archive.org/stream/cu31924073...ge/n9/mode/2up

    Chinese character dictionary: handy reference for translating Chinese words and characters
    http://www.mandarintools.com/chardict.html

    Comprehensive List of all the attractions and rides ever to exist on Coney Island
    http://www.westland.net/coneyisland/...s/ridelist.htm


    Chinese Exclamations
    http://hua.umf.maine.edu/Chinese/top...n/douying.html

  14. #39
    practical experience, FTW M J Austwick's Avatar
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    The Historical European Martial Arts Coalition has recently published the first in a series of Factsheets pertaining to authentic historical combat. Worth a look if you're interested in violence.

    http://www.hemac.org/index.php?site=factsheets
    WIP: Death in Scilly - 67k, Cozy Murder Mystery, in final edit

    My website and blog

  15. #40
    practical experience, FTW snafu1056's Avatar
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    Great racial demographics map of the US

    http://demographics.coopercenter.org/DotMap/index.html

  16. #41
    practical experience, FTW
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    Demographics of a Fantasy Medieval Society:

    http://www.rpglibrary.org/utils/meddemog/

    and an explanation for the stats:

    http://www222.pair.com/sjohn/blueroom/demog.htm

  17. #42
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    Dialect help

    For those who wish to know what a Shetlander sounds like without having to travel all the way there and for those who don't believe how much accents can vary over a very small area, I present this:

    http://www.shetlanddialect.org.uk/di...ap-of-shetland

    Enjoy!


    And BTW, this is the Shetland Islands:

    https://www.google.co.uk/maps/vt/dat...AwiFs4Di9mQ77r


    And they are right at the top of this:
    http://www.mapsofworld.com/united-ki...ritain-map.gif

    And they look like this:
    http://move.shetland.org/assets/imag...ts-lerwick.jpg

  18. #43
    Craving the next chocolate hit... Los Pollos Hermanos's Avatar
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    I remember my Dad telling the tale of how some Shetland residents had to fill out an information form (I forget for what), where one of the questions was about their nearest railway station. They answered with "Bergen, Norway" as it's apparently technically nearer than mainland Scotland on some of the islands.

    I've been to John O'Groats, but the Orkneys/Shetlands are still on my bucket list!

  19. #44
    Caped Codder jaksen's Avatar
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    Very interesting. Some I can understand quite well; others I can't. I think it's a common complaint when someone is speaking your language, and you can pick up most of the words but not all of them, that you want to say: Slow down!

    A lot of differences in a fairly small area. You might find the same in some parts of the US. English is being spoken, but the dialects are so various, you'll hear a great difference in the way words are spoken or strung together.

    But fascinating nonetheless.
    Latest story in December 2013 issue of EQMM.

    Eeyore was saying to himself, “This writing business. Pencils and what-not. Over-rated if you ask me. Silly stuff. Nothing in it.” A.A. Milne

  20. #45
    Merovingian Superhero ULTRAGOTHA's Avatar
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    I've been to the Orkney's. Very pretty and lots and lots and lots and lots of neolithic (and older lithic) archeological sites. We had so much fun and I wish we could go back. Also, the best ice cream I have ever eaten.

    I wonder if there's a site out there that could help me with my minor Welsh character. He hasn't much of a speaking part but I want to get it right.
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions; but everyone is not entitled to their own facts."
    --Daniel Patrick Moynihan

    ================================
    "He has the courage of a fighting cock and the brains of a chicken."
    -I cannot find the attribution for this :-(
    ================================

    @ULTRAGOTHA on Twitter

  21. #46
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    Yes there is. I think the BBC has either a site or a link to a site that has gathered together a lot of the dialects of the British Isles. Mainly because a lot of them are slowly disappearing. Let me see if I can find it.

  22. #47
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    I found it!

    It's someone from the BBC but it's kept on the British Library website. And it's a great resource!

    http://sounds.bl.uk/Accents-and-dial...X0007XX-0201V0

  23. #48
    Overwriting Telergic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ULTRAGOTHA View Post
    I wonder if there's a site out there that could help me with my minor Welsh character. He hasn't much of a speaking part but I want to get it right.
    Just append -bach occasionally to people's names, you'll be fine

    Seriously, I'm a little concerned about this myself. For a WIP I have people from Wales, Cornwall, Ireland, Man, and highland and lowland Scotland speaking English together, and I'm trying to give them distinctive voices, despite not being a native of the UK myself.

    Broad Scots is easy enough -- so easy you can fall into a parody if you're not careful -- but some of the others are less clear, especially if you don't use dialect-spellings. There are plenty of sites out there including various Wikipedia pages that list characteristic phrases and styles, but the trick is to use them in a way that suggests the differences without seeming blatant or intrusive. So for example, I gather that in Wales there is more of a tendency to phrase statements as questions than in England. But this tendency can't be presented in too obvious a way or it will look silly, don't you think?

  24. #49
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    Definitely listen to that website. It's got lots of native speakers having conversations about how they speak. It will definitely help you distinguish the different inflections and decide how much you want to add to your writing. It's also really good for slang.

  25. #50
    Overwriting Telergic's Avatar
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    And this is a great video I just found, a single reader talking his way through a survey of all the major dialects while the video follows on the map:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8mzWkuOxz8

    However, this is all pronunciation, not regional phrases and distinctive usages.

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