Winter scene of a small village with snowmen and a UFO

AW Amazon Store

If this site is helpful to you,
Please consider a voluntary subscription to defray ongoing expenses.


 

Welcome to the AbsoluteWrite Water Cooler! Please read The Newbie Guide To Absolute Write

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 31 of 31

Thread: Do hogs actually eat dead human bodies?

  1. #26
    Ideas bounce around in my head Jason's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    4,772
    Well, it's getting on near dinner time, and the stomach was growling in hunger, but this thread sure solved that problem! LOL
    2017 Goals
    Read 50 of these books
    Come up with a good book idea and actually write it!

  2. #27
    practical experience, FTW Axl Prose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    the slums
    Posts
    478
    Hannibal (the book, I can't remember how much was in the movie) goes into great detail on this subject btw.
    Last edited by Axl Prose; 11-29-2017 at 10:50 AM.

  3. #28
    practical experience, FTW
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by Friendly Frog View Post
    It's not just hogs either. A lot of otherwise perfectly happy herbivores like deer or tortoises will nibble a carcass if they come across it. Butterflies even. But unlike hogs these are unlikely to eat the lot. Still, I never quite looked the same way at deer since seeing that one pic of a deer with a human rib sticking from its mouth, looking straight at the camera. That shot was even taken in a actual study to see what sort of animals would snack on a human carcass. Oh yeah, Bambi will happily take a bite...
    It's the bones in carcasses that interest deer and other herbivores. They're a source of minerals, sort of like a salt lick. The phenomenon of herbivores eating bones is well enough documented to have a name: osteophagia. Of course, they sometimes do eat more than the bones. I recently read a book by the recently retired Curator of Education at the Bronx Zoo, who recounts the startling scene of watching a giraffe munch its way through a whole pigeon (presumably grabbed from a tree branch), feathers, flesh, bones and all. There's a mention in another post of Lammergeiers (German for Lamb Vultures; the English common name is Bearded Vultures), vultures that actually eat bones. It might be worth noting that they don't sit and munch on the bones at the carcass--they take the bones up in the air and smash them into bits by dropping them onto rocks and then eating the shattered results.

  4. #29
    Snarkenfaugister Friendly Frog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    1,286
    *makes note of correct English name for lammergeier*

    Huh, I was so sure English used lammergeier too, but at least now that clears up what a bearded vulture looks like. We live and learn.

    Yeah, it's pretty impressive how they deal with bones. It's apparently not an easy skill either, they have to look for a good smashing sites and account for things like windspeed and such or the bone won't break right.
    Crede esse ranas.

  5. #30
    practical experience, FTW
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by Friendly Frog View Post
    *makes note of correct English name for lammergeier*

    Huh, I was so sure English used lammergeier too, but at least now that clears up what a bearded vulture looks like. We live and learn.

    Yeah, it's pretty impressive how they deal with bones. It's apparently not an easy skill either, they have to look for a good smashing sites and account for things like windspeed and such or the bone won't break right.
    There are really no rules when it comes to common names. I've heard/seen the German name used by English speakers. There is also another archaic common name, ossifrage, from the Latin, which shows up in some more old-fashioned English translations of the Bible.

  6. #31
    practical experience, FTW Tazlima's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    1,997
    WARNING: Grossout ahead

    I have a pet squirrel, and she eschews any and all meat (I've offered it to her occasionally just to see what she would do).

    That is, she DID. THen one day, through a series of bizarre circumstances, she came face to face with a pinkie newborn wild mouse. For the first sniff or two, as it squirmed and made tiny sucking noises at her, I thought her interest was maternal in some way. Then she grabbed it and scarfed it down, bones and all, in about 30 seconds flat, like it was a big old candy bar.

    Sooo gross... Poor little mouse.
    Last edited by Tazlima; 12-01-2017 at 11:05 PM.
    "One of the hardest things to do, I think, is learn to trust your own creativity." - Ambrosia

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Custom Search