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  1. #26
    blue eyed floozy shakeysix's Avatar
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    I am back to teaching, tutoring and translating for a recently arrived high school student who speaks only Spanish. I was given a chrome book to use when taking notes but when I am in class with my student, translating notes in World History, Physical Science, PE--( we are studying how to use a compass with a map right now) and English 1, the Chromebook only screws me up. I have to do the translation with pen and paper. Later, when I have time, I can check my translation with Google Translate but pen and paper are my first resort. I was feeling kind of old dog, new tricks about it, but this forum is comforting. I am doing it my way. The kid, Claudia, mainly relies on Translate.

    Now Algebra, es otro costal de harina --a horse of a different color. Maybe because I never really understood it in my own high school experience, maybe because it scares the H out of me, but I can only translate Algebra with internet help. --s6

  2. #27
    The Tripinnate Kitkitdizzi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElaineA View Post
    I do the same. My handwriting is decent enough to read, but I've concocted this hybrid--and back-leaning--writing, I *think* because it's speedier. I know it's faster than formal cursive, and writing cursive leaning to the right feels awkward to my hand (even though I'm a righty). The only consistent-looking writing I do is my signature. I still hand write birthday cards for friends and family, and include a handwritten short-something in my Holiday cards, even though it's not lovely-looking. I'm always impressed by people who have perfect handwriting.
    Interesting. I had to go look--my handwriting is almost straight-up-and-down, with an occasional, very slight left slant.

    I'm one of those who will not write holiday cards. Maybe because I don't like getting them. I hate clutter, yet feel that cards are one of those things I shouldn't throw out. Dunno why, so they leave me very conflicted.

    Quote Originally Posted by shakeysix View Post
    I am back to teaching, tutoring and translating for a recently arrived high school student who speaks only Spanish. I was given a chrome book to use when taking notes but when I am in class with my student, translating notes in World History, Physical Science, PE--( we are studying how to use a compass with a map right now) and English 1, the Chromebook only screws me up. I have to do the translation with pen and paper. Later, when I have time, I can check my translation with Google Translate but pen and paper are my first resort. I was feeling kind of old dog, new tricks about it, but this forum is comforting. I am doing it my way. The kid, Claudia, mainly relies on Translate.
    The PE class is teaching how to use a compass and map? That's awesome, I thought that was becoming a lost art. I use a map and compass at work, so I can attest it has real-world applications.
    Fueled by the coffee Tiddlywinks says she gave up...(though she's totally lying)


  3. #28
    Needs hugs. Lots of hugs. Saoirse's Avatar
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    My handwriting is horrible. At my former job, my boss used to complain about not being able to read it. When I took dictation, I had my own version of shorthand that I'm pretty sure no one else could decipher.

    I read somewhere that for us people using computers for years (and typewriters, I suppose), we will not be able to write well (or legibly) because the brain has been rewired for typing. So there's actually a neurological reason why some people can no longer handwrite legibly!

    I use the computer for everything, unless I need to brainstorm. I used to write in journals (from the time I was 11 till I was about 19, then I switched to online journals. Now b/c of a hand injury I can no longer handwrite for more than 10 minutes without pain.
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  4. #29
    All the nopes. lizmonster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PorterStarrByrd View Post
    Post-its and a whiteboard on the wall behind me, a whole lot more convenient than searching for where I recorded a thought.
    I do almost everything on the computer except for timelines. I've got a 9 x 12 lie-flat notebook and Post-Its in five colors. I have to be able to move things around easily, and click-and-drag just doesn't do it for me, no matter how nice your mind mapping software is.
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  5. #30
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin insolentlad's Avatar
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    For many years, every first draft was in pencil. I could never take to using a typewriter as I'm not very linear in my writing. Loads of articles, all my poetry, even my first novel—but, bit by bit, I moved to the computer. It's suited to my workflow, it's faster. But I still jot down ideas with paper and pencil when I'm away from my desk. Especially when they come to me in the middle of the night.

  6. #31
    professional dilettante Lakey's Avatar
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    What a lovely and interesting thread.

    I am an inveterate hand-writer. I have a brain-pen connection that just doesn't work the same way in type. I can, and often do, compose at the computer, merely for efficiency. But when I get stuck, or when I really want to think expansively about a topic (film review, book review, my novel, or anything else) I sit down with my notebook and pen. When I edit my own work or someone else's, I prefer to print out a copy and do the editing by hand. I am the kind of person who writes notes in the margins of books.

    I've been in a rough patch with my novel for the last month or two, and I've been trying to just push through it and get to the end of the first draft - and I have been doing this in ink in my notebook. I can't write at the computer when I am not happy with what I'm writing. It's too easy to kill it, to get bogged down in trying to fix it here, now, instead of moving forward. In the notebook, I can keep going. That sentence wasn't great, but I can fix it later. That paragraph didn't quite do what I wanted it to, but at least its out now, and I can move on to the next one.

    It has been working, though I now have about 6000 words in my notebook that I will sooner or later have to type up!

    My handwriting is composed of tiny, very uniform block capitals, and I tend to write on fine-line quad rule (graph paper). My notebooks get a lot of comments, at work and when I'm writing anywhere publicly like a cafe. My notebooks and my handwriting are the tidiest thing about me, by a very, very wide margin. (I'm tempted to upload a picture to show it off)
    Last edited by Lakey; 11-04-2017 at 04:39 PM.

  7. #32
    Delerium ex Ennui Xelebes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitkitdizzi View Post
    The PE class is teaching how to use a compass and map? That's awesome, I thought that was becoming a lost art. I use a map and compass at work, so I can attest it has real-world applications.
    Compass and map are key elements in some rally sports like orienteering.

  8. #33
    Dead. Snitchcat's Avatar
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    Definitely prefer writing by hand when it comes to fiction. Non-fiction varies. However, I write oddly by hand: sometimes forwards, sometimes backwards. Either way, because I'm usually composing in English, I get a lot of stares. Not sure what my audience is thinking: am I showing off, or they're just fascinated by the process? Well, (1) I'm not showing off; I do compose in English and I do naturally right forwards and backwards as the wont takes me. And (2) if they're fascinated, fine, but if the fascination turns into nosiness, they'd better not be the target of my composition (usually ends with me killing them in some fashion, 'cos fiction).

    That said, I have writing that slants to the right, is sharp, cursive, and neat. I rather like it. And have received compliments on it from time to time -- from those who actually know me and have seen it, or from strangers who have the courage to get passed the vibe of "leave me alone or regret your intrusion" (deliberate vibe when I'm in a crowd).

    Currently, going through a pencil phase. Have been for a few years now. However, if I write in ink, love fountain pen, but a good micro-point gel pen works well, too. Regarding paper, usually narrow ruled for all types of writing. I will use graph paper if I want "precision" in something.
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  9. #34
    blue eyed floozy shakeysix's Avatar
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    Our PE teacher has the kids out on the football field these chilly mornings with compasses and notebooks, playing something like geocache. At first the kids hated it, but now they are getting into it. The teacher, Mrs. Miller, is old school but younger than I am. She wants the kids to learn about bearings and compasses before gps takes over.

    I hadn't made the connection before but 60 years ago, my first grade teacher, a cranky, 60ish nun, thought that ball point pens were a flash in the pan novelty. She insisted that we learn to write cursive with inkwells and steel nib pens. Not fountain pens but the ones that dip into inkwells. The class was called penmanship and we spent an hour or two on it every week. Sister Dalmatia would bring in a phonograph to play soothing music while 29, 7 year old baby boomers scratched away on Big Chief tablets trying to match the examples on the board. She would walk through the aisles checking our output. God forbid our pen hand rested on the paper.

    I never used anything but a ball point in any class after that. We thought the whole penmanship thing was a waste of time when I took my teacher ed classes. Later, when I taught college comp I made the class write one 250 word essay with paper and pen, no spellcheck, no typing. I put it in the syllabus! When they bitched I told them that handwriting an essay is a useful skill. Who knows, maybe computers are just a flash in the pan and they will thank me for making them learn this. Sister Dalmatia, Mrs. Miller and me, teaching the past to the future. --s6
    Last edited by shakeysix; 11-05-2017 at 03:52 PM.

  10. #35
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin insolentlad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shakeysix View Post
    I hadn't made the connection before but 60 years ago, my first grade teacher, a cranky, 60ish nun, thought that ball point pens were a flash in the pan novelty. She insisted that we learn to write cursive with inkwells and steel nib pens. Not fountain pens but the ones that dip into inkwells. The class was called penmanship and we spent an hour or two on it every week. Sister Dalmatia would bring in a phonograph to play soothing music while 29, 7 year old baby boomers scratched away on Big Chief tablets trying to match the examples on the board. She would walk through the aisles checking our output. God forbid our pen hand rested on the paper.
    I use a dip pen for artwork but do not think I could I write with it very well! We were required to use fountain pens for penmanship class in my Catholic school.

  11. #36
    blue eyed floozy shakeysix's Avatar
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    No fountain pens in this class. I think they were too expensive. And maybe because we were only writing letters not sentences. I remember my mom laughing at the school supply list because even she thought dip pens were archaic. The ink was a mess. I was always worried that I didn't have enough. Sadly, I usually had way too much.

    From Second grade on we used ballpoint pens and those big, round pencils. I remember a time when ball point pens were expensive, coveted and rare. I lost one of my Dad's once in sixth grade and never heard the end of it. Must be why they are still chained to the desk in the Post Office--another archaic place. --s6
    Last edited by shakeysix; 11-05-2017 at 08:05 PM.

  12. #37
    pretending to be awake onesecondglance's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizmonster View Post
    I do almost everything on the computer except for timelines. I've got a 9 x 12 lie-flat notebook and Post-Its in five colors. I have to be able to move things around easily, and click-and-drag just doesn't do it for me, no matter how nice your mind mapping software is.
    Post-its and Sharpies remind me too much of my day job for me, but there's definitely something nice about doing this stuff off-screen. Much more tactile.
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  13. #38
    Despite being a Millennial, I grew up writing everything by hand for school and didn't get comfortable with computers until about a decade ago. My schoolwork was boring so I focused a lot on stylizing my handwriting in different ways, developing different ways of doing printing or cursive, etc. People marveled over my handwriting a lot back then.

    Once I learned to type, though, that was faster, and I do all my plotting and drafting on word documents where I can just spew it all out in one place and don't have to keep track of bunches of little physical things like notecards or post its or anything. It also feels more private, and I like to keep my writing stuff private from the people I live with.

    Now that I'm back in school, I hand write all my lecture notes--and again, they're just all spewed out into one notebook. I also have to write my all labs by hand and those have to be legible for grading purposes. I've noticed that my handwriting isn't as nice as it used to be--mediocre for my labs, terribly illegible for my notes where speed is prioritized--but also in doing the labs, I've gotten better at using precise, succinct language and thinking ahead about what idea I want to express and when and how, because you can't just hit the backspace button when you're writing by hand. This is good practice for organizing my thoughts or ideas into words before trying to commit them to paper, and makes my computer writing better, too.

    I generally prefer a mechanical pencil--you can get a good fine point and it's not permanent. But I have to use a pen for labs and that's been a nightmare. For a while I was struggling with a ballpoint pen that wouldn't reliably roll ink on the cover paper, but the pressure was enough for stuff to show up on the carbonless copy. Now I have a pen that rolls ink great, but it's cracked where one part screws to the other and tends to explode into pieces if I squeeze too hard in the wrong place. I really like writing with those micropoint sharpies--the ink is soooo nice and black--but they tend to bleed a bit. Really need to find something that isn't a piece of crap before I go nuts.
    Last edited by Silva; 11-05-2017 at 10:53 PM.

  14. #39
    The mean one AW Moderator Cath's Avatar
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    My handwriting is very unique to me (i.e. barely legible to anyone else) and written with an eye for speed rather than correct letter formation or aesthetics. I love the feel of writing with fountain pens and grew up using Parker Pilots (aka the 5 fountain pens you could pick up in WH Smith), but in the last few years I’ve become increasingly fond of the curved nib on some of the Cross fountain pens.
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  15. #40
    Travelling around the sun cbenoi1's Avatar
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    So I bought this Microsoft Surface Pro thing. Top-of-the-line. Office 365. The whole nine yards. I use it every day. And yet...

    My favorite tools by far are OneNote and the Surface pen. Go figure.

    -cb

  16. #41
    Herder of Hamsters AW Admin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silva View Post
    I really like writing with those micropoint sharpies--the ink is soooo nice and black--but they tend to bleed a bit. Really need to find something that isn't a piece of crap before I go nuts.
    Try a Uni Ball Gel micropoint. They're all over, my local grocery store carries them in black, but read this about micropoint gel pens.

    And I really love Kuru Toga mechanical pencils; the lead rotates a little every time you lift the point off the paper, so that it is always sharp.
    Last edited by AW Admin; 11-06-2017 at 05:21 PM.

  17. #42
    pretending to be awake onesecondglance's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbenoi1 View Post
    So I bought this Microsoft Surface Pro thing. Top-of-the-line. Office 365. The whole nine yards. I use it every day. And yet...

    My favorite tools by far are OneNote and the Surface pen. Go figure.

    -cb
    It is a really good stylus. But a bit more expensive than a biro.
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  18. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by AW Admin View Post
    Try a Uni Ball Gel micropoint. They're all over, my local grocery store carries them in black, but read this about micropoint gel pens.

    And I really love Kuru Toga mechanical pencils; the lead rotates a little every time you lift the point off the paper, so that it is always sharp.
    Thank you for the rec and resources.

  19. #44
    Learning to read more, post less cmhbob's Avatar
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    I bought a Kuru Toga from Walmart based on her earlier recommendation. I love it, but after two months, I'm still learning to not rotate the pencil every so often.

  20. #45
    practical experience, FTW Raindrop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmhbob View Post
    I bought a Kuru Toga from Walmart based on her earlier recommendation. I love it, but after two months, I'm still learning to not rotate the pencil every so often.
    It's a good habit to keep anyway. It's not like it's going to damage your mechanical pencil! I often draw with a 2mm clutch pencil, and I had to re-learn to rotate this one.

  21. #46
    Oerba Yun Fang DragonHeart's Avatar
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    I don't use analog tools much for my writing and never have, but in the past few years I've gotten back to paper for other things. I've had a lifelong obsession with notebooks anyway, now I'm just finding ways to actually use them.

    I currently have 4 notebooks/journals that get use:

    The first one is my gaming journal. I actually filled it up and need to pick out a new one, but I still refer back to it often enough. I love to take notes as I play games, so I decided to just start putting all my notes in one place. It's also a neat little history of the games I've played since I started keeping it. I've got I think about a years' worth of gaming in this one notebook, with everything from copied wiki charts to my competitive bred Pokemon teams.

    The second one is my bullet journal. I don't use this one as much as I would like to, but it's still an extremely valuable tool for organizing my life. The current notebook I'm using isn't quite a size I would like; it's slightly too small to be comfortable, and I think that's a big part of why I haven't been that dedicated about its use. I'll just upgrade at the end of the year, regardless of whether this one is done or not. It probably will be though since it doesn't have that many pages anyway.

    The third one is my work bullet journal. I started my current job in March; I had a free journal given to me by one of my uncles that I brought with me on a whim, and it's quickly become one of the most valuable references not just for me but the whole team. Literally everyone has used it at some point, either for my contact list, general information, or even instructions on how to do various tasks. I haven't been very good about updating it lately, but it still gets used almost daily.

    The final one is also the first time I actually bought a journal for a specific purpose, rather than just using whatever I had laying around. It's a nice green hardcover that actually gets used more than my bullet journal. This is my Brazilian Portuguese study journal. I'm learning the language and it's rapidly becoming essentially a personal textbook/reference as I learn. Because the grammar notes are not available on the mobile app, I've taken to writing down the Duolingo lessons in this journal as I go. I find hand writing the notes helps me a lot with retention later, so I don't think it's redundant or a waste of time. It's got a lot more than that in it too. I even plan on asking my Brazilian coworkers/work friends to write notes in it so I can practice translating later; it's definitely going to be a very personal record on top of all the knowledge.
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  22. #47
    figuring it all out DougR.'s Avatar
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    I jot notes in a bound notebook, but when it comes to actual writing, it's 100% digital. If computers didn't exist, I wouldn't be writing. Sad, but true. Writing by hand for me is physically painful.
    Last edited by DougR.; 11-13-2017 at 07:36 PM.

  23. #48
    Special Snowflake? No. Hailstone RedRajah's Avatar
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    When I act in plays, I always have a notebook & pencil with me to write in between scenes while I'm backstage/in the green room.

  24. #49
    practical experience, FTW CheG's Avatar
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    My writing is a combo of cursive and printing. I also use my left hand frequently to save my right hand (which I use for art). And I handwrite ALL my books! Luckily I write Middle Grade so they all hover around 45K or so.

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