Krampus on skies

AW Amazon Store

If this site is helpful to you,
Please consider a voluntary subscription to defray ongoing expenses.


 

Welcome to the AbsoluteWrite Water Cooler! Please read The Newbie Guide To Absolute Write

Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Continuing to Query While an Agent Has Your Full?

  1. #1
    practical experience, FTW Felix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    109

    Continuing to Query While an Agent Has Your Full?

    Not sure where to ask this question. If it's in the wrong place, let me know!

    During a querying phase, an agent offered a personalized response and said he liked my premise. He said he would be willing to read a resubmission after editing.

    After editing, I resubmitted and said "You are the only agent who currently has the query and submission. I wanted to honor your offer before passing it on to anyone else..."

    He responded to the edited submission by requesting the full.

    I am a forward-momentum kind of person, so unless I'm actively doing something, I feel like I'm sitting still. This may be why I feel antsy. There is no deadline for him to read it. It could be four days or three years. My question: Is it ethical to continue to query other agents? (I think I'm answering my own question and siding with no but I'm curious what the peanut gallery thinks.)
    When I'm too tired for words, I Instagram. Yes, girls can like whiskey and wrenches.

  2. #2
    Great Old One CameronJohnston's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Posts
    297
    Yes, it is usual and entirely expected that you will be sending your manuscript out to other agents. Unless this agent actually asked for an Exclusive reading period then you are absolutely fine to continue sending it out elsewhere. Just let them know if you do sign with this agent so you don't waste their time.
    The Traitor God, published by Angry Robot in June 2018

    Website Twitter

  3. #3
    practical experience, FTW
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Both sides of the Atlantic
    Posts
    108
    I agree with Cameron but with one caveat. The agent may think he has an exclusive based on how you worded the submission. It could be interpreted that way. Something like this happened to me, and an agent got a bit miffed when she found out I had another offer after she'd had the full for like 2 months, thinking she had time. It was an awkward situation, a misunderstanding. If you intend to submit to others, maybe drop the agent a note first clarifying when you'd like to move forward. That would give the agent the opportunity to formally request an Exclusive within a set amount of time. Anyway, openness and honesty is always best.

  4. #4
    practical experience, FTW Felix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by Atlantic12 View Post
    I agree with Cameron but with one caveat. The agent may think he has an exclusive based on how you worded the submission. It could be interpreted that way. Something like this happened to me, and an agent got a bit miffed when she found out I had another offer after she'd had the full for like 2 months, thinking she had time. It was an awkward situation, a misunderstanding. If you intend to submit to others, maybe drop the agent a note first clarifying when you'd like to move forward. That would give the agent the opportunity to formally request an Exclusive within a set amount of time. Anyway, openness and honesty is always best.
    So a combination of the two! I'm glad I asked for an objective opinion.

    I like this agent very much and really do want to work with him. We have common interests and from our limited communication, I *get* him. But I also don't want to wait for an extended period of time when it's very possible that someone else out there might want it.

    The mind does play tricks on us while we wait. I've nearly convinced myself that he only requested the full out of kindness and he's going to sit on it for thirty days before mercilessly crushing my soul.

    Perhaps I will give it three weeks or so. Slog through NaNo with my second novel. Then I can shoot him a note and let him know that I'd like to resume querying in early December, unless he would like the exclusive.

    Thank you so much for the advice!
    When I'm too tired for words, I Instagram. Yes, girls can like whiskey and wrenches.

  5. #5
    figuring it all out
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    62
    I don't have as much experience as many other posters/authors here, but my impression is that there's never any reason to offer/tell an agent you're giving them an exclusive opportunity unless they ask for it first. In fact, some agencies explicitly say on their sites NOT to send them an exclusive submission because it'd be a waste of your time and they wouldn't treat it any differently than a normal submission.

  6. #6
    the possibilities are endless noranne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    883
    Normally I would say yes, it is absolutely expected to continue to query while an agent has your full. However, based on the wording you've provided, I agree with Atlantic that it could be interpreted as offering him an exclusive. I would just make sure you clarify the situation before moving ahead--if you're really excited about this agent, maybe give it a couple weeks to see if he jumps on it and if not let him know you're continuing to submit?
    “We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master.”
    —Ernest Hemingway

    Website |♦| The Write Side of Life |♦| Twitter |♦| YouTube

    MS1: YA SF, 68k, trunked
    MS2: YA F, 70k, trunked
    MS3: YA F, 76k, trunked
    MS4: A SF, 94k, trunked
    MS5: A F, 63k, trunked

    MS6: A SF, 90k, editing, again
    MS7: A F, 79k, waiting its turn

  7. #7
    practical experience, FTW Antipode91's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    212
    I don't really agree.

    You didn't offer him an exclusive. Nothing of the such was said, or signed. The agent didn't even reply to what you said. They just asked for a full.

    Keep in mind, agents have flaws and come from varying degrees of experience. If one gets angry because you have another offer, then it not only shows the agent's maturity, but it also shows how they're going to pursue editors on your behalf. If they're only going to send one manuscript at a time, waiting for a form rejection before sending out another, then they aren't working well for you.

    It's absolutely assumed that you're querying to other agents as they read your fulls. There's no need to tell them you are doing so, or dropping by with a second email about it.

    You're not holding a bidding war between two agents, anyway. You send your full, they say they want to represent you, and what they can do for you. You get another offer from another agent. If you aren't sure if one is a good match for you, then you ask them questions. You email their clients. Then you make your choice. There isn't even a need to tell one that another has given you an offer.

  8. #8
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    7
    ^
    Sounds about right. It's like having two job offers, you don't have to tell everyone you interview with "oh hey, I'm interviewing elsewhere as well." They should expect you are. And if you take what you deem to be a better offer (even if it's only better because it was more timely), that's entirely your prerogative. It's business, after all.

  9. #9
    the possibilities are endless noranne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    883
    Quote Originally Posted by A Guy View Post
    ^
    Sounds about right. It's like having two job offers, you don't have to tell everyone you interview with "oh hey, I'm interviewing elsewhere as well." They should expect you are. And if you take what you deem to be a better offer (even if it's only better because it was more timely), that's entirely your prerogative. It's business, after all.
    Sure, but in this case it would be like you've already told one of them that they're the only one you're interviewing with. If you've told them that, you should probably give them a heads up when the situation changes.
    “We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master.”
    —Ernest Hemingway

    Website |♦| The Write Side of Life |♦| Twitter |♦| YouTube

    MS1: YA SF, 68k, trunked
    MS2: YA F, 70k, trunked
    MS3: YA F, 76k, trunked
    MS4: A SF, 94k, trunked
    MS5: A F, 63k, trunked

    MS6: A SF, 90k, editing, again
    MS7: A F, 79k, waiting its turn

  10. #10
    Not as sweet as you think Aggy B.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Just north of the Deep South
    Posts
    11,373
    Quote Originally Posted by Antipode91 View Post
    There isn't even a need to tell one that another has given you an offer.
    No. No. No.

    Sorry. But, no. It *is* expected that when you receive an offer that you notify other agents who are considering the MS. Not doing so *is* bad form and will not make you look good. (The only exception would be if someone offers and you realize immediately that they are not the right agent for you and refuse the offer. Otherwise, an offer means you notify everyone who is looking at the MS that you have received an offer and they have X amount of time - usually 14 days - in which to finish reading and make their own offer if they wish or to withdraw from consideration.)
    _________
    A.G.C.

    Touch: A Trilogy - AVAILABLE NOW!
    "I loved this novella series. Brooding, earthy, whispering to us with a delicious mood of creeping dread while filling the heart with a pure sense of wonder." - Charles de Lint, author of The Onion Girl

    A.G. Carpenter
    @Aggy_C Patreon Ko-Fi

  11. #11
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by noranne View Post
    Sure, but in this case it would be like you've already told one of them that they're the only one you're interviewing with. If you've told them that, you should probably give them a heads up when the situation changes.
    Eh, maybe. But maybe you could fudge things and say "hey, this other guy I queried before you got back to me and also requested the full, so hurry up!"

  12. #12
    Living the dream CaroGirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Bookstores
    Posts
    8,354
    Quote Originally Posted by Aggy B. View Post
    No. No. No.

    Sorry. But, no. It *is* expected that when you receive an offer that you notify other agents who are considering the MS. Not doing so *is* bad form and will not make you look good. (The only exception would be if someone offers and you realize immediately that they are not the right agent for you and refuse the offer. Otherwise, an offer means you notify everyone who is looking at the MS that you have received an offer and they have X amount of time - usually 14 days - in which to finish reading and make their own offer if they wish or to withdraw from consideration.)
    Yes to this ^^^!!

    I have five fulls out to agents right now and the majority who requested the fulls had a variation of the following in their email: "Please let me know as soon as possible if the status of your manuscript changes." Meaning, if I get an offer, I let everyone who has my full know immediately. As far as I'm aware, that's standard industry practice. And, frankly, simple good manners.

  13. #13
    Not as sweet as you think Aggy B.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Just north of the Deep South
    Posts
    11,373
    Quote Originally Posted by A Guy View Post
    Eh, maybe. But maybe you could fudge things and say "hey, this other guy I queried before you got back to me and also requested the full, so hurry up!"
    Oh, you mean lie about requests or offers? That's been discussed before. It doesn't end well for the author. (Because agents do talk to each other and you do that enough times and they realize you're stringing them along trying to get a faster response.)

    Some agents will ask to be notified if someone else has/does make a full request, but they typically ask for names. This is to keep you honest and lying about it will make you look bad.

    Also, agents are potential business partners. Starting off the relationship with manipulation is probably not wise, even if you could get away with "fudging" interest from other parties.
    _________
    A.G.C.

    Touch: A Trilogy - AVAILABLE NOW!
    "I loved this novella series. Brooding, earthy, whispering to us with a delicious mood of creeping dread while filling the heart with a pure sense of wonder." - Charles de Lint, author of The Onion Girl

    A.G. Carpenter
    @Aggy_C Patreon Ko-Fi

  14. #14
    practical experience, FTW Shoeless's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,347
    Quote Originally Posted by Aggy B. View Post
    Some agents will ask to be notified if someone else has/does make a full request, but they typically ask for names. This is to keep you honest and lying about it will make you look bad.
    That's true, some of them will. It's not the *exact* same scenario, but when I was in the query trenches and finally got an offer on my novel, I sent out my notifications to the other agents that had the full and one of them actually did ask who was making the offer. I'm sure part of it was curiosity, but another part was also that it is a small world, and it doesn't hurt to send out feelers and make sure that a potential client who just announced an offer is "legit," and really is just trying to narrow down choices, rather than try and force a situation into rushing everyone else into an offer.

    Unfortunately, "fake offers" have happened. I believe there was as scam just earlier in the year with multiple agents all receiving the same "threat" of offer, like clockwork, two weeks after a query was submitted.
    Last edited by Shoeless; 12-07-2017 at 07:05 AM.

  15. #15
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    7
    Wait, I misread the first post. If the word "exclusive" was never used, why wouldn't you query other agents?

  16. #16
    Not so secret agent
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    642
    Quote Originally Posted by Shoeless View Post
    That's true, some of them will. It's not the *exact* same scenario, but when I was in the query trenches and finally got an offer on my novel, I sent out my notifications to the other agents that had the full and one of them actually did ask who was making the offer. I'm sure part of it was curiosity, but another part was also that it is a small world, and it doesn't hurt to send out feelers and make sure that a potential client who just announced an offer is "legit," and really is just trying to narrow down choices, rather than try and force a situation into rushing everyone else into an offer.

    Unfortunately, "fake offers" have happened. I believe there was as scam just earlier in the year with multiple agents all receiving the same "threat" of offer, like clockwork, two weeks after a query was submitted.
    I ask for the names of offering agents for a number of reason. 1) If it's a friend or someone I think is better for the project, I'll step aside. 2) Fake offers abound, as do fake referrals. I've received enough to now question everything. 3) I'm a curious bee.
    *opinions are my own*

    The Tobias Literary Agency
    Twitter: @TheTobiasAgency
    Twitter: @LaneHeymont

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Custom Search