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Thread: Equifax Hack: 44% of Americans Had Their SSN, names & birthdate stolen

  1. #101
    Travelling around the sun cbenoi1's Avatar
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    -cb
    Last edited by cbenoi1; 09-13-2017 at 11:14 PM.

  2. #102
    All about that action, boss. ElaineA's Avatar
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    I have two Me's now

    The IRL me:

    Random tweety things @outtamylaine

    And this other me:
    reneedominick.com and @Renee_Dominick on Twitter
    Also, this me is a contributor to kINKED, an Erotic Romance Anthology


  3. #103
    Sockpuppet
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbenoi1 View Post


    -cb
    I laughed.

    Seriously, though, a properly configured service would not even reveal that the username is valid or not. "That username/password combination was not found in our records." Something like that.

  4. #104
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    Something else to consider: The information that the Equifax breach put into the hands of criminals does JUST enable new accounts in your name.

    That information can also be used to hijack your existing accounts.

    “Based on what I’ve seen in the past, I would estimate that less than 5 percent of Americans will have new loans, bank accounts, credit cards and other financial accounts taken out by a criminal in their name over their lifetime,” [Gartner Distinguished Analyst Avivah] Litan said. What’s more likely is that stolen information will be used to take over existing accounts, such as banking, brokerage, phone service, and retirement accounts. Call centers and online systems rely on these pieces of information to verify identity when conducting high-risk transactions, such as moving money across accounts or changing the information associated with the account.

    “It makes no sense to solely rely on static personally identifiable information to identify an individual a business is engaged with when there is a greater than 50 percent chance that data is in criminal hands,” Litan said.

  5. #105
    Player of the Year nighttimer's Avatar
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    Hell hath no fury like Elizabeth Warren pissed. Read her letter to Equifax's CEO.
    Most people don't want to change. They're comfortable and set in their ways. But in order to change, you have to be able to agitate people at times. And I think that's something that's very necessary for us to improve as a country.
    ~ Colin Kaepernick



    Watch This Space


  6. #106
    ever seeking GeorgeK's Avatar
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    Apparently my info was compromised

    Experian was easy to get a freeze online

    Transunion would not let me do it online because they wanted to know the year model of a car that we don't own. We did have one of that model that we traded in a few years ago. Yesterday their phone lines were so garbled that I literally could not tell if I was hearing someone's voice or if it was canned music on hold. This morning I was able to do it via a phone algorithm.

    Equifax will not let me institute a freeze unless or until I can tell them the house number of my previous address from 18 years ago. I'm not even sure where to look for that.

  7. #107
    practical experience, FTW Tazlima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nighttimer View Post
    Hell hath no fury like Elizabeth Warren pissed. Read her letter to Equifax's CEO.
    This is a thing of beauty.
    "One of the hardest things to do, I think, is learn to trust your own creativity." - Ambrosia

  8. #108
    Player of the Year nighttimer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeK View Post
    Apparently my info was compromised

    Experian was easy to get a freeze online

    Transunion would not let me do it online because they wanted to know the year model of a car that we don't own. We did have one of that model that we traded in a few years ago. Yesterday their phone lines were so garbled that I literally could not tell if I was hearing someone's voice or if it was canned music on hold. This morning I was able to do it via a phone algorithm.

    Equifax will not let me institute a freeze unless or until I can tell them the house number of my previous address from 18 years ago. I'm not even sure where to look for that.
    Lord, what an ungodly mess.
    Most people don't want to change. They're comfortable and set in their ways. But in order to change, you have to be able to agitate people at times. And I think that's something that's very necessary for us to improve as a country.
    ~ Colin Kaepernick



    Watch This Space


  9. #109
    Herder of Hamsters AW Admin's Avatar
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    This is the best thing I've seen so far about what to do.

    If you've got elderly relatives, you might want to check in with them; the over 64 are deliberately targeted.

  10. #110
    I meant to do that. Lyv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeK View Post
    Apparently my info was compromised

    Experian was easy to get a freeze online

    Transunion would not let me do it online because they wanted to know the year model of a car that we don't own. We did have one of that model that we traded in a few years ago. Yesterday their phone lines were so garbled that I literally could not tell if I was hearing someone's voice or if it was canned music on hold. This morning I was able to do it via a phone algorithm.

    Equifax will not let me institute a freeze unless or until I can tell them the house number of my previous address from 18 years ago. I'm not even sure where to look for that.
    Ugh. We got ours frozen at all three, but I had to call Experian, and even they don't know why. I can't remember which bureau it was, but one gave us a list of names, using our last name but different first names from ours, and asked if any of those people own property in Florida. I guess it was a trick question since we used to, and our first names were not there, but our last name isn't that uncommon. We answered no anyway and it seemed to work, but what a dumb question. How would I know if anyone with our last name and any of those first names owns property in Florida?

    And I love my senator, Elizabeth Warren. I added my thanks for that letter and her advocacy when I called her office about ACA repeal yesterday.

  11. #111
    practical experience, FTW Rachel77's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyv View Post
    Ugh. We got ours frozen at all three, but I had to call Experian, and even they don't know why.
    I had to call Experian as well; their website was all "sorry, can't do this", but the security freeze went through fine via their phone system.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lyv View Post
    I can't remember which bureau it was, but one gave us a list of names, using our last name but different first names from ours, and asked if any of those people own property in Florida. I guess it was a trick question since we used to, and our first names were not there, but our last name isn't that uncommon. We answered no anyway and it seemed to work, but what a dumb question. How would I know if anyone with our last name and any of those first names owns property in Florida?
    TransUnion? One of the questions I got was "Which town does this person own property in?", giving my sister's full name. Which was deeply creepy, but from what you've posted, it sounds like they might have just been doing name matches to guess at possible relatives. (Our family name is uncommon, in the sense that anyone with that last name is guaranteed to be related. On the other hand, my great-great grandfather had 19 children, all of whom had multiple children, so there are a lot of us. I guess I'm lucky they picked my sister to ask me about, instead of some relative I've never heard of.)

  12. #112
    I meant to do that. Lyv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel77 View Post
    TransUnion? One of the questions I got was "Which town does this person own property in?", giving my sister's full name. Which was deeply creepy, but from what you've posted, it sounds like they might have just been doing name matches to guess at possible relatives. (Our family name is uncommon, in the sense that anyone with that last name is guaranteed to be related. On the other hand, my great-great grandfather had 19 children, all of whom had multiple children, so there are a lot of us. I guess I'm lucky they picked my sister to ask me about, instead of some relative I've never heard of.)
    I think it was TransUnion. My old last name is like yours; uncommon and every time I've found someone with the same last name, we've been able to find our family connection.

    When I called Experian, they let me freeze my husband's credit, too. I was glad to save him a phone call, but it surprised me.

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