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Thread: Alex Y. Arnold’s email address?

  1. #1
    Learning to read more, post less
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    Alex Y. Arnold’s email address?

    I want to find Alex Y. Arnold’s email address since he has often tweeted he wants diverse and #ownvoices books.


    he’s Editor at Katherine Tegen Books at HarperCollins Publishers. But though I find his blog, twitter, etc I cant find his email to query him. If anyone can find it, can you please post it so I can query him? Thanks!


    Btw does anyone know if he’s a man or woman? Alex could be a woman’s name and I don't want to get it wrong when I address him.

  2. #2
    please distract me mccardey's Avatar
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  3. #3
    Learning to read more, post less
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    yes thats the one. but whats his email?

  4. #4
    beef rank be frank's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossword View Post
    yes thats the one. but whats his email?
    Dude, seriously? Her.
    The early bird may catch the worm, but it's the second mouse that gets the cheese.

    here be all the query exercises

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  6. #6
    please distract me mccardey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossword View Post
    yes thats the one. but whats his email?
    Seriously? Look at the page!
    Last edited by mccardey; 06-18-2017 at 12:22 PM.

  7. #7
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    I did look at the page. I want her email, not her twitter.
    Last edited by crossword; 06-18-2017 at 12:19 PM.

  8. #8
    practical experience, FTW cornflake's Avatar
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    Why are you querying an editor? Do you have an invitation to do so? If not, you don't want to do that.

  9. #9
    beef rank be frank's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cornflake View Post
    Why are you querying an editor? Do you have an invitation to do so? If not, you don't want to do that.
    +1
    The early bird may catch the worm, but it's the second mouse that gets the cheese.

    here be all the query exercises

  10. #10
    Such a nasty woman SuperModerator Old Hack's Avatar
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    If anyone finds the email address requested please don't post it here. We don't want to send a load of spam to the agent in question. But I don't think that having this editor's email address is going to help the OP: what they need is a good agent, who can then make an appropriate submission on their behalf.

  11. #11
    Sick and pale with grief. StoryofWoe's Avatar
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    If you've found her Twitter profile and her MSWL page and her Tumblr page, then you could probably surmise that Alex Y. Arnold is a woman (though, to be fair, she doesn't explicitly state her pronoun preferences). I'm always a little confused when I see editors from Big 5 pubs on manuscriptwishlist.com. Are they open to unagented subs, or aren't they? If they aren't, why are they directly making their preferences known to authors?

    OP, have you tried tweeting to her? She seems fairly active on Twitter.
    Last edited by StoryofWoe; 06-18-2017 at 12:57 PM. Reason: All the typos. It's 4am.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Hack View Post
    If anyone finds the email address requested please don't post it here. We don't want to send a load of spam to the agent in question. But I don't think that having this editor's email address is going to help the OP: what they need is a good agent, who can then make an appropriate submission on their behalf.
    What Old Hack and others have said: Query an agent. The only imprints at Harper Collins that accept unagented submissions are Avon Impulse and HarperLegend:
    With the exception of our Avon Impulse and HarperLegend imprints, HarperCollins does not accept unsolicited submissions. Any unsolicited manuscripts, proposals or query letters that we receive will not be returned, and HarperCollins is not responsible for any materials submitted. We recommend that you consult your local bookstore or library for sources that can direct you in locating an appropriate agent and/or publisher.
    Last edited by Ari Meermans; 06-18-2017 at 01:07 PM.
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  13. #13
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    If anyone finds her email address, can you please PM it to me?


    “I'm always a little confused when I see editors from Big 5 pubs on manuscriptwishlist.com. Are they open to unagented subs, or aren't they? If they aren't, why are they directly making their preferences known to authors?”

    EXACTLY. That’s why I assumed she wanted to be contacted by writers. Why is she telling agents her preference? Any agent would anyway run to submit to Harper Collins.

    I just turned on images and saw a pic of a woman posted on Twitter. i’m so used to accessing the net with images turned off it never occurred to me earlier to turn them on and see if she has a pic. Her MSWL did seem very woman-centric, especially her wanting stories about rape culture, but she could have been a man who was very concerned about women’s issues.

    She has so many tweets about how she wants diverse stories that I thought I should do my best to send her my query.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossword View Post
    She has so many tweets about how she wants diverse stories that I thought I should do my best to send her my query.
    That would be unprofessional, discourteous and a boneheaded move.

    You know why she doesn't have her email listed? She doesn't want unsolicited subs.

    Get an agent.

  15. #15
    Rewriting My Destiny Cyia's Avatar
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    Tweets and #MSWL are not professional contacts. They're the equivalent to putting an ad in the paper saying: Publisher seeking books about alien dogs spotted in Central Park.

    You wouldn't ask the paper to run you an add beside the editor's stating that you have what they're looking for, or to pitch them an idea for a story / column. You would go through proper channels, which in this case is to get an agent. If you can't find an email address with a simple search or two, they've hidden it specifically because they don't want it found.

  16. #16
    What to my wondering eyes... AW Moderator Sage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoryofWoe View Post
    I'm always a little confused when I see editors from Big 5 pubs on manuscriptwishlist.com. Are they open to unagented subs, or aren't they? If they aren't, why are they directly making their preferences known to authors?
    Agents use twitter too. They know how to search #mswl, the MSWL website, editor blogs, etc. for what editors are wishing for. It helps informs them and authors about the market, as well as specific wishes.
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  17. #17
    Such a nasty woman SuperModerator Old Hack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoryofWoe View Post
    I'm always a little confused when I see editors from Big 5 pubs on manuscriptwishlist.com. Are they open to unagented subs, or aren't they? If they aren't, why are they directly making their preferences known to authors?
    Some Big Five editors will accept unsolicited ms, but on the whole, it's not a good idea to try.

    The information on manuscriptwishlist.com might well have been extracted from interviews or talks the editors have given. When they tweet using the hashtag they don't necessarily assume that writers will respond: it's a way of letting everyone in the business know where you are and what you're after.

    Quote Originally Posted by crossword View Post
    If anyone finds her email address, can you please PM it to me?


    “I'm always a little confused when I see editors from Big 5 pubs on manuscriptwishlist.com. Are they open to unagented subs, or aren't they? If they aren't, why are they directly making their preferences known to authors?”

    EXACTLY. That’s why I assumed she wanted to be contacted by writers. Why is she telling agents her preference? Any agent would anyway run to submit to Harper Collins.

    I just turned on images and saw a pic of a woman posted on Twitter. i’m so used to accessing the net with images turned off it never occurred to me earlier to turn them on and see if she has a pic. Her MSWL did seem very woman-centric, especially her wanting stories about rape culture, but she could have been a man who was very concerned about women’s issues.

    She has so many tweets about how she wants diverse stories that I thought I should do my best to send her my query.
    Do NOT email your query to her.

    It will just get deleted unread.

    Then if you do get an agent and ask her to submit your work to this editor for you, you'll have to let her know you sent the work to this editor already and she won't be able to repeat that submission. You'll have spoiled the pitch.

    Seriously. Don't do it.

  18. #18
    Sick and pale with grief. StoryofWoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sage View Post
    Agents use twitter too. They know how to search #mswl, the MSWL website, editor blogs, etc. for what editors are wishing for. It helps informs them and authors about the market, as well as specific wishes.
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Hack View Post
    The information on manuscriptwishlist.com might well have been extracted from interviews or talks the editors have given. When they tweet using the hashtag they don't necessarily assume that writers will respond: it's a way of letting everyone in the business know where you are and what you're after.
    Ah, yes. I guess that makes sense. I just assumed agents and editors had their own channels for communicating preferences--ones writers weren't necessarily privy to--and perhaps they still do, in addition to social media. Thanks for clearing that up. From now on, I'll assume Big 5 editor profiles on MSWL.com = window shopping for authors.
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  19. #19
    figuring it all out shizu's Avatar
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    From her Twitter: she only accepts agented submissions (and her MSWL is addressed to agents, rather than authors).

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    “Some Big Five editors will accept unsolicited ms”


    can you please give me the names of any that will?



    Thanks, everyone. Since she says she only accepts agented submissions, I won't query her.

  21. #21
    Grr. Argh. Thedrellum's Avatar
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    crossword, it might be effective for you to research those Big 5 publishers and imprints which accept unsolicited submissions, and then researching the editors at those imprints/publishers before you submit.

  22. #22
    practical experience, FTW cornflake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossword View Post
    “Some Big Five editors will accept unsolicited ms”


    can you please give me the names of any that will?



    Thanks, everyone. Since she says she only accepts agented submissions, I won't query her.
    Be careful with that plan -- as OH pointed out, if you query an editor at a publishing house, and then get an agent, the agent cannot then submit there.

    If you're thinking of looking for an agent, you don't want to approach editors directly.

  23. #23
    Such a nasty woman SuperModerator Old Hack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossword View Post
    “Some Big Five editors will accept unsolicited ms”


    can you please give me the names of any that will?
    I could. But I'm not going to, because you ignored the second part of my statement, and my giving you those names would not help you. They might not work in the right genre for you, they might only accept submissions from people they know, and so on and so forth.

    Is there any reason why you're not looking for an agent? That would be a much wiser way to proceed than scrabbling around trying to find editors you can submit to without an agent. Because your agent can submit your work to everyone at those big publishers.

  24. #24
    Rewriting My Destiny Cyia's Avatar
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    crossword, if you're thinking that going directly to publishers is a shortcut, or that it will in some way net you more money since you're cutting out the agent step, you need to reassess your understanding of the situation.

    Slush submissions - the giant pool you'd be putting your work into - are the last ones to be read and considered. That's after referrals, new works by authors already with the imprint, and targeted-agent submissions. You can spend literal years in a slush pile for a big house, slush-submissions are often on an exclusive basis (meaning you can't sub that piece of work anywhere else, which is a restriction not put on agented submissions, and if they read it and reject it, you might never know because they might not tell you. Many places are "no reply means no," only you don't know how long it takes to get an answer in the first place, so you keep waiting.

    And as for the idea that you can "cut out the middle man" or something, any slush submission is going to get a boiler plate offer. It's a standard low-ball offer, and since you're on your own, you have no leverage or experience with which to negotiate for a better deal.

    For example, lets say you're offered a boiler plate $10,000 for one book:

    Sure, $10,000 sounds great, but you're looking at that $10,000 as a whole. In reality, it would be chopped into halves or thirds, payable over a few years, and you'd still have to pay taxes on it.

    Those caveats still apply to agented deals, but that $10,000 grand can end up being $50,000 in a good agent's hands. Sure, they get their 15%, but 85% of $50,000 is a whole lot more than all of $10,000.

    And if they can negotiate for a series, rather than a one-off, it's even better.

  25. #25
    Such a nasty woman SuperModerator Old Hack's Avatar
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    What Cyia said.

    Also, remember that writers selling their own work are probably only going to sell their books in their home markets, while good agents sell every book they work on to several different markets, and in a few different formats, too. Foreign and subsidiary rights are a real thing, and can easily double a writer's income.

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