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Thread: Between the Lines Publishing

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by aliceshortcake View Post
    It's rather ironic that there's a perfect example of the risks of going with a new publisher on BTL Publishing's own Facebook. The owner of Mighty Quill Books, founded in 2015, is struggling:

    http://www.writinginadarkroom.com/po...-post-to-write

    She's launched an appeal on Patreon and the company is currently seeking promotion team members, developmental editors, copy editors and proofreaders willing to work for free.

    While we're on the subject of editing and proofreading, two of the three BTL books I looked at were not edited to a professional standard.
    Come on, are you planning on going after every post? Do you have issue with helping another author? Without knowing the full story, you've decided in your infinite wisdom to use their situation in this conversation. Unless you are privy to the details of a given situation, don't assume to judge.

    So, since you're so quick with the know-it-all comments, why don't you tell me what YOUR experience is, shortcake. Have you owned a publishing company? What gives you the expertise to deem who is worthy of being in business or not?

    BTW - while you're out on your beer run, grab a hard cider for me. ;-)

  2. #27
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    While this has been lovely, I can see there is zero chance at having a professional conversation. What started out as someone deciding the press was unworthy, but didn't know how to tell their friend, has turned into vitriol. BLP does not scam anyone nor do we require any published author to pay for services (clients yes - though not sure how many times I need to explain that one point). We work to market each book published, but expect our authors to participate in their own marketing.

    With the exception of one (Old Hack (btw - love the name)) - none of you have offered your own expertise or experience. You sit, in self-appointed judgement, of publishing companies. If a company has scammed or hurt authors, then go to it. If they are a vanity press, have a good time, but going after indie presses (not just this one) who do not meet YOUR idea of being worthy of existence need to be left to succeed or fail on their own. You claim to be protecting new authors, yet nothing you've said above (again, with the exception of one) offered anything constructive or demonstrated how any author is at risk.

    I wish all of you success it whatever it is you choose to do. I would appreciate your leaving my business - my livelihood alone.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    While this has been lovely, I can see there is zero chance at having a professional conversation. What started out as someone deciding the press was unworthy, but didn't know how to tell their friend, has turned into vitriol. BLP does not scam anyone nor do we require any published author to pay for services (clients yes - though not sure how many times I need to explain that one point). We work to market each book published, but expect our authors to participate in their own marketing.

    With the exception of one (Old Hack (btw - love the name)) - none of you have offered your own expertise or experience. You sit, in self-appointed judgement, of publishing companies. If a company has scammed or hurt authors, then go to it. If they are a vanity press, have a good time, but going after indie presses (not just this one) who do not meet YOUR idea of being worthy of existence need to be left to succeed or fail on their own. You claim to be protecting new authors, yet nothing you've said above (again, with the exception of one) offered anything constructive or demonstrated how any author is at risk.

    I wish all of you success it whatever it is you choose to do. I would appreciate your leaving my business - my livelihood alone.
    You put your business on the Internet.

    If you're offering editing services for pay, and claiming to run a professional publishing concern, yet putting out books with numerous, glaring errors on the first page, I don't know what, exactly, you expected would happen.

    People who know better are going to call that out. Sorry. This is the 'Bewares, Recommendations & Background Check' section. Your 'publishing company' is public. People are thus going to evaluate it and post their recommendations, based on what they see -- like lots of basic errors in published work.

    If that's not something you enjoy, I'd suggest employing professional editors.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    While this has been lovely, I can see there is zero chance at having a professional conversation. What started out as someone deciding the press was unworthy, but didn't know how to tell their friend, has turned into vitriol. BLP does not scam anyone nor do we require any published author to pay for services (clients yes - though not sure how many times I need to explain that one point). We work to market each book published, but expect our authors to participate in their own marketing.

    With the exception of one (Old Hack (btw - love the name)) - none of you have offered your own expertise or experience. You sit, in self-appointed judgement, of publishing companies. If a company has scammed or hurt authors, then go to it. If they are a vanity press, have a good time, but going after indie presses (not just this one) who do not meet YOUR idea of being worthy of existence need to be left to succeed or fail on their own. You claim to be protecting new authors, yet nothing you've said above (again, with the exception of one) offered anything constructive or demonstrated how any author is at risk.

    I wish all of you success it whatever it is you choose to do. I would appreciate your leaving my business - my livelihood alone.
    I mean... I did, but I guess you ignored me. Though my response was mostly about your website and covers. Considering I have a graphic design background and have been creating websites since 1997 (yes, I started web design at 7) that's the only expertise I can give you. I have never worked as a publisher or editor, but I know about websites and I know about good design. And it's kind of common sense to add an 'About' page. Take it for what you will, but your website and the covers of your books are the front line of what anyone finds about your company and right now it's not great.
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  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    While this has been lovely, I can see there is zero chance at having a professional conversation. What started out as someone deciding the press was unworthy, but didn't know how to tell their friend, has turned into vitriol. BLP does not scam anyone nor do we require any published author to pay for services (clients yes - though not sure how many times I need to explain that one point). We work to market each book published, but expect our authors to participate in their own marketing.

    With the exception of one (Old Hack (btw - love the name)) - none of you have offered your own expertise or experience. You sit, in self-appointed judgement, of publishing companies. If a company has scammed or hurt authors, then go to it. If they are a vanity press, have a good time, but going after indie presses (not just this one) who do not meet YOUR idea of being worthy of existence need to be left to succeed or fail on their own. You claim to be protecting new authors, yet nothing you've said above (again, with the exception of one) offered anything constructive or demonstrated how any author is at risk.

    I wish all of you success it whatever it is you choose to do. I would appreciate your leaving my business - my livelihood alone.
    My experience - Seventeen years running publishing companies. Started two small publishing houses that I sold to larger publishing houses after building them, including one imprint that ended up with one of the Big Five. Old Hack can vouch for my track record.

    The comment I made to you is that you can't produce a book (any product, really) that isn't up to market standard and expect to be graded on a curve because you're just starting out. I stand by that. Feel attacked if that makes you feel better, but the market itself is objective, and still isn't going to excuse sub-par products. And if you're basing your livelihood on those same products, you're playing a risky game that will not end well. Ever.

    You understand why it hurts an author if his/her publisher has to reformat a book after it has already been released, right? You understand the association bookstores and readers make between authors and their books, I'm sure. You understand why protecting new authors from that kind of thing is constructive and how it helps keep authors from unnecessary risks.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by folclor View Post
    I mean... I did, but I guess you ignored me. Though my response was mostly about your website and covers. Considering I have a graphic design background and have been creating websites since 1997 (yes, I started web design at 7) that's the only expertise I can give you. I have never worked as a publisher or editor, but I know about websites and I know about good design. And it's kind of common sense to add an 'About' page. Take it for what you will, but your website and the covers of your books are the front line of what anyone finds about your company and right now it's not great.
    Thanks for the response. The about section of the webpage will be up soon - I appreciate that input. There are only four covers on the webpage - all were well received. If the conversation could be civil, I would happily ask for your professional opinion on how to improve them - but every comment I make here, even in explanation of something, gets turned back around.
    Specializing in creative fiction and poetry that delves into the world between. Do you have a character in transition? Urban fantasy or time travel? Paranormal? If you have a story with a liminal theme, we want to hear from you. Between the Lines Publishing

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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Round Two View Post
    My experience - Seventeen years running publishing companies. Started two small publishing houses that I sold to larger publishing houses after building them, including one imprint that ended up with one of the Big Five. Old Hack can vouch for my track record.

    The comment I made to you is that you can't produce a book (any product, really) that isn't up to market standard and expect to be graded on a curve because you're just starting out. I stand by that. Feel attacked if that makes you feel better, but the market itself is objective, and still isn't going to excuse sub-par products. And if you're basing your livelihood on those same products, you're playing a risky game that will not end well. Ever.

    You understand why it hurts an author if his/her publisher has to reformat a book after it has already been released, right? You understand the association bookstores and readers make between authors and their books, I'm sure. You understand why protecting new authors from that kind of thing is constructive and how it helps keep authors from unnecessary risks.
    I do understand how authors are associated to their books. I appreciate your experience as well. I am not asking to be treated on a bell. The issue I had from the beginning is that someone had questions/concerns about my company. Instead of asking directly, they came here and started a thread asking for thoughts. Any professional would have approached the company in question and not pulled out comments such as in this thread. If they are so concerned for their friend - they should talk to them and express their opinion (for that is what it is). If they decide to go elsewhere, we would not hold them to the contract.

    How is it acceptable to bring in my personal fb page? One has nothing to do with the other. That is where I brought up the attack mode this forum entered.

    The question is - do you leave the vitriol standing or do you actually go back and look at those who have been deemed unworthy? I'm not looking for approval, just asking. It seems the only thing this thread has done is point how much of a disaster you consider my company. What exactly have any of you offered to help improve it (other than the about page)? Or are you only here to tear down?
    Last edited by WrdWvr; 06-15-2017 at 04:25 AM.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post

    The question is - do you leave the vitriol standing or do you actually go back and look at those who have been deemed unworthy? I'm not looking for approval, just asking. It seems the only thing this thread has done is point how much of a disaster you consider my company. What exactly have any of you offered to help improve it (other than the about page)? Or are you only here to tear down?
    What am I offering to help improve your company? Nothing currently. If you want to pay me six figures, we can talk, though. Me making observations certainly doesn't necessitate that I do free work for you. Especially, because the particular issue the specific issue I brought up -- releasing an improperly formatted book into a marketplace that has standards--would require a time machine to fix at this point. I only asked why you would put out a book that wasn't going to meet consumer expectations.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    I do understand how authors are associated to their books. I appreciate your experience as well. I am not asking to be treated on a bell. The issue I had from the beginning is that someone had questions/concerns about my company. Instead of asking directly, they came here and started a thread asking for thoughts. Any professional would have approached the company in question and not pulled out comments such as in this thread. If they are so concerned for their friend - they should talk to them and express their opinion (for that is what it is). If they decide to go elsewhere, we would not hold them to the contract.

    How is it acceptable to bring in my personal fb page? One has nothing to do with the other. That is where I brought up the attack mode this forum entered.

    The question is - do you leave the vitriol standing or do you actually go back and look at those who have been deemed unworthy? I'm not looking for approval, just asking. It seems the only thing this thread has done is point how much of a disaster you consider my company. What exactly have any of you offered to help improve it (other than the about page)? Or are you only here to tear down?
    Your neighbour, Sue, who wants her house painted, signs a contract with a local painting company. If a mutual friend told you that the contract Sue signed seems concerning, because the pics of work they've done, posted on their webpage, look like crap, would you tell the friend that the best thing to do would be to call the painting company and ask them questions? Or, maybe, would you suggest asking around to see if anyone had experience with the company, looking at the houses in person, showing the website pics to other friends, etc.?

    Professionals don't fuck around calling companies that seem sketchy to ask about the sketchiness. Why would they call the companies? What would anyone expect the people at the company to say but something positive? Due diligence involves actual sources, not biased ones. Your website and those unedited books with your company's name on them are actual sources of information.

    I'm happy to help you edit, if you'd like. Contact me via PM for my rates.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Round Two View Post
    What am I offering to help improve your company? Nothing currently. If you want to pay me six figures, we can talk, though. Me making observations certainly doesn't necessitate that I do free work for you. Especially, because the particular issue the specific issue I brought up -- releasing an improperly formatted book into a marketplace that has standards--would require a time machine to fix at this point. I only asked why you would put out a book that wasn't going to meet consumer expectations.
    I'm not asking you to improve my company. It was a rhetorical question. I have 20 years experience running large businesses and that was before I joined the publishing industry. I asked if you only tear down something or if you actually offered constructive comments. Based on my financials, my business model is doing rather well.

    The two books I was referring to are not substandard in their format. It was simply a comment.

    Have a great night.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by cornflake View Post
    Your neighbour, Sue, who wants her house painted, signs a contract with a local painting company. If a mutual friend told you that the contract Sue signed seems concerning, because the pics of work they've done, posted on their webpage, look like crap, would you tell the friend that the best thing to do would be to call the painting company and ask them questions? Or, maybe, would you suggest asking around to see if anyone had experience with the company, looking at the houses in person, showing the website pics to other friends, etc.?

    Professionals don't fuck around calling companies that seem sketchy to ask about the sketchiness. Why would they call the companies? What would anyone expect the people at the company to say but something positive? Due diligence involves actual sources, not biased ones. Your website and those unedited books with your company's name on them are actual sources of information.

    I'm happy to help you edit, if you'd like. Contact me via PM for my rates.
    Actually, I would express my concerns and suggest they ask questions. If I knew Sue was unaware of what to ask, I would offer suggestions on the type of questions to ask. She is afraid to burst their bubble, yet is willing to let them get in over their head (based on the earlier comments). Good friend.
    Specializing in creative fiction and poetry that delves into the world between. Do you have a character in transition? Urban fantasy or time travel? Paranormal? If you have a story with a liminal theme, we want to hear from you. Between the Lines Publishing

    Check us out on Facebook.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    I'm not asking you to improve my company. It was a rhetorical question. I have 20 years experience running large businesses and that was before I joined the publishing industry. I asked if you only tear down something or if you actually offered constructive comments. Based on my financials, my business model is doing rather well.

    The two books I was referring to are not substandard in their format. It was simply a comment.

    Have a great night.
    Knowing what it takes to make money running a publishing company, I'm guessing we have radically different concepts of what "doing rather well" means. The formula involves a mixture of total number of titles available X number of units each book sells. You don't have many books out yet and I can see the sales ranks on Amazon. This isn't hard math to ballpark.

    As far as the "substandard in their format" bit, this is from you, earlier in the thread "I do agree there are areas for improvement for both books - specifically with formatting. Both are in the process of being reformatted to give the content cleaner lines and improved appearance."



  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    Actually, I would express my concerns and suggest they ask questions. If I knew Sue was unaware of what to ask, I would offer suggestions on the type of questions to ask. She is afraid to burst their bubble, yet is willing to let them get in over their head (based on the earlier comments). Good friend.
    From what I can parse of that, I guess we're just different.

    If my friend said she was submitting to a publishing company that put out error-ridden books, I'd simply tell her to run away, not call the company to ask about all the errors.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    The issue I had from the beginning is that someone had questions/concerns about my company. Instead of asking directly, they came here and started a thread asking for thoughts. Any professional would have approached the company in question and not pulled out comments such as in this thread.
    Well, no, not really. This forum has tens of thousands of members, nearly all of whom are professional (in the behavioral sense of the word), so it's standard practice here to start threads about publishers and ask "Hey, does anyone have experience or info about this press?" Take a look at this subforum -- it's a zillion miles long! And most threads have proven extremely useful. If you have time to spare, you can scroll through some and see how the experts here, like Old Hack, have time and time again predicted with perfect accuracy the implosion, downward spiral, or trajectory to success that presses experienced.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by cornflake View Post
    From what I can parse of that, I guess we're just different.

    If my friend said she was submitting to a publishing company that put out error-ridden books, I'd simply tell her to run away, not call the company to ask about all the errors.
    Yep, that's my reaction too. If I check out a publisher and its website or published books have lots of typos and grammatical errors, I just hit the X button and move on.

    So, if the owner of BTLP is looking for feedback, here's mine: Less than one minute on your website was enough to make me hit the X button and move on.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    It was suggested that newer publishers should have a few years under their belt before authors submit to them. That is a circular argument. A publisher can not get experience without authors to publish. If potential authors avoid newer presses based on this advice, the press will inevitably fail.
    I understand the need to be cautious and pragmatic with new companies, but at the same time I've always felt it was a bit of a Catch-22. A person should wait for a few years to see how the company is doing before submitting. Let others test the waters? But the advice is telling everyone to not be the ones to try, but to wait it out. And yet if everybody is doing that, how is the company going to be able to prove themself? All companies need to start off somewhere, oui?

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    I have 20 years experience running large businesses and that was before I joined the publishing industry.
    It's probably been asked already, so I'll ask it again: but what sort of experience do you have running a publishing company? Having that much experience is certainly helpful but what have you done in the industry before that makes you qualified to operate this venture? These threads are loaded with companies that were started by people with extensive knowledge operating their own businesses but, in the end, that didn't help because without the experience that comes with working in and for publishers, the publishers folded.

    That is what we're actually trying to prevent.

    Believe it or not, we want your business to succeed. Really. Honestly and truly. With so many companies that go under during their first five years of operation, we honestly, truly, and really do want to see your business flourish. In the end, however, if your company fails, it's a long, ugly, complicated mess if it's not handled correctly; an author stands to lose a lot if something happens next week and you have to shutter the company's doors. Many, many people who have answered this thread have years of experience in the publishing industry in one form another; some are authors all the way up to editors and agents.

    We're not pulling random scary stories and threats out of our asses just to piss you off and harangue you into taking your ball and going home. We are speaking from years of experience, based on what we've seen in other publishing firms and what we've seen happen in front of us. But in the end, you take whatever you decide from the advice that's being given. Up to you. Just understand, once again, we're actually trying to help.

  18. #43
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    I take chances on new presses when I know the people involved have experience in publishing and/or publishing related fields. They need to have professional formatting, covers, and marketing...as well as enough capital to weather the first couple of years. And even then they're a risky bet, because new presses can crash and burn very easily.

    I feel for Wrd and Between The Lines, but publishing is a business. No one gets graded on a curve if you put products on public display, for sale.

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  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by BenPanced View Post
    It's probably been asked already, so I'll ask it again: but what sort of experience do you have running a publishing company? Having that much experience is certainly helpful but what have you done in the industry before that makes you qualified to operate this venture? These threads are loaded with companies that were started by people with extensive knowledge operating their own businesses but, in the end, that didn't help because without the experience that comes with working in and for publishers, the publishers folded.

    That is what we're actually trying to prevent.

    Believe it or not, we want your business to succeed. Really. Honestly and truly. With so many companies that go under during their first five years of operation, we honestly, truly, and really do want to see your business flourish. In the end, however, if your company fails, it's a long, ugly, complicated mess if it's not handled correctly; an author stands to lose a lot if something happens next week and you have to shutter the company's doors. Many, many people who have answered this thread have years of experience in the publishing industry in one form another; some are authors all the way up to editors and agents.

    We're not pulling random scary stories and threats out of our asses just to piss you off and harangue you into taking your ball and going home. We are speaking from years of experience, based on what we've seen in other publishing firms and what we've seen happen in front of us. But in the end, you take whatever you decide from the advice that's being given. Up to you. Just understand, once again, we're actually trying to help.
    Thank you - I honestly appreciate your response.

    My experience feels like multiple lives lived simultaneously. Business wise, I've worked as an senior operations manager in the financial world, was a business manager for multiple small companies - creating budgets, business models, and running the day to day operations. In the publishing world, I started as an intern as a proofreader and editor at Bloomsbury. I worked for several smaller presses in the UK and US (editing and running daily operations). I worked with Oxford Uni Press with academic non-fiction editing.

    I knew better than to start a business without having at least 2 years capital reserves.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    The issue I had from the beginning is that someone had questions/concerns about my company. Instead of asking directly, they came here and started a thread asking for thoughts. Any professional would have approached the company in question and not pulled out comments such as in this thread.
    I'm just curious. If I'm considering buying a new Toyota, would you consider it unprofessional of me to look at customer reports or independent publications which focus on cars? Is the only appropriate course of action to contact Toyota and ask their opinion of their own cars?
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  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by chompers View Post
    I understand the need to be cautious and pragmatic with new companies, but at the same time I've always felt it was a bit of a Catch-22. A person should wait for a few years to see how the company is doing before submitting. Let others test the waters? But the advice is telling everyone to not be the ones to try, but to wait it out. And yet if everybody is doing that, how is the company going to be able to prove themself? All companies need to start off somewhere, oui?
    Mais oui. But not all starts are equal.

    Del Rey was created by Judy Lynn Del Rey, an experienced editor, and Lester Del Rey, an established author.

    Tor was founded by Tom Doherty, who had a lot of background when it came to the industry. From the link: "He was a salesman for Pocket Books in 1959 when he met Ian Ballantine, who taught him about publishing. A variety of sales and publishing jobs later, Doherty became publisher of Ace in 1975, where he remained for five years until starting Tor Books in 1980."

    DAW - Donald A. Wollheim was an editor at Avon and Ace before he founded DAW Books in 1972.

    If a press is founded by people with experience, and if the press looks professional from the start, there's less risk for writers. But a lot of presses these days aren't like this, and they implode. Advising writers to wait might seem unfair to the press, but I'd rather look out for writers.

    As for how such new presses prove themselves, they can do that with the writers who want to take a risk, or who don't think it's a risk, or who aren't aware it's a risk. There will always be plenty of these.
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  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by chompers View Post
    I understand the need to be cautious and pragmatic with new companies, but at the same time I've always felt it was a bit of a Catch-22. A person should wait for a few years to see how the company is doing before submitting. Let others test the waters? But the advice is telling everyone to not be the ones to try, but to wait it out. And yet if everybody is doing that, how is the company going to be able to prove themself? All companies need to start off somewhere, oui?
    The presses I've watched start up and continue successfully have had a few things in common. First, they are run by people with sufficient industry experience that they can hit the ground running and put out a top notch product wrt editing, cover art, etc right from the first title. Second, they are run by people with sufficient industry ties that before they even open for business they can shoulder-tap some established authors and contract some books with them, so that the first titles the press releases are from known authors with a built in readership. Success then breeds success.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    Thank you - I honestly appreciate your response.

    My experience feels like multiple lives lived simultaneously. Business wise, I've worked as an senior operations manager in the financial world, was a business manager for multiple small companies - creating budgets, business models, and running the day to day operations. In the publishing world, I started as an intern as a proofreader and editor at Bloomsbury. I worked for several smaller presses in the UK and US (editing and running daily operations). I worked with Oxford Uni Press with academic non-fiction editing.

    I knew better than to start a business without having at least 2 years capital reserves.
    I'm sorry, I don't understand the bolded.

    Also, if you've worked as an editor, why not either edit the books yourself or hire an editor? You have to know how bad it looks to have error-filled titles under your company's name.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    Okay - let me make this clearer for all of you - no one we have published has EVER paid for any service we offer. If an author requests a sample edit (this is free) and we decide from that sample to make an offer, we do. If they opt to only use the editing services, then we move forward with that agreement, but if they decide to accept our offer to publish, then we complete a publishing agreement. No money is exchanged.

    Two of the authors we are publishing this year started out this way.
    Thank you for clearing that up. Much appreciated. I know I was banging on about it, but I have seen so many publishers weasel their way through getting authors to pay for their services that I feel it's important to know how things work.

    You've published one anthology and two books by single authors so far. So are you telling me that you offered to publish those two books after having only read a sample they sent you for editing? Because if so, that's not good.

    Like you I've been in the industry for a while - though you've got years on me. I respect your comments based on your experience and accept the changes that need to occur to the website. Funny thing is, it is based off a publishing template, but go figure. Thank you for that input. I started out as an intern for Bloomsbury, with several indie presses, and Oxford University Press. I have edited both fiction and academic non-fiction.
    Publishing template? I don't understand.

    I also am confused that you have interned for Bloomsbury and the UOP, because it is usual to remain in one genre when working in publishing; and it seems from your background that you live and work in the US, not in the UK.

    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    While this has been lovely, I can see there is zero chance at having a professional conversation. What started out as someone deciding the press was unworthy, but didn't know how to tell their friend, has turned into vitriol. BLP does not scam anyone nor do we require any published author to pay for services (clients yes - though not sure how many times I need to explain that one point). We work to market each book published, but expect our authors to participate in their own marketing.

    With the exception of one (Old Hack (btw - love the name)) - none of you have offered your own expertise or experience. You sit, in self-appointed judgement, of publishing companies. If a company has scammed or hurt authors, then go to it. If they are a vanity press, have a good time, but going after indie presses (not just this one) who do not meet YOUR idea of being worthy of existence need to be left to succeed or fail on their own. You claim to be protecting new authors, yet nothing you've said above (again, with the exception of one) offered anything constructive or demonstrated how any author is at risk.

    I wish all of you success it whatever it is you choose to do. I would appreciate your leaving my business - my livelihood alone.
    I see no vitriol here and if I did, I would stamp on it (and don't forget, you can report posts you feel are inappropriate by clicking on the little warning triangle on that particular post). What I do see is people asking tough but reasonable questions about a publishing house, and the principal of that publishing house responding with less than good grace.

    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    I do understand how authors are associated to their books. I appreciate your experience as well. I am not asking to be treated on a bell. The issue I had from the beginning is that someone had questions/concerns about my company. Instead of asking directly, they came here and started a thread asking for thoughts. Any professional would have approached the company in question and not pulled out comments such as in this thread. If they are so concerned for their friend - they should talk to them and express their opinion (for that is what it is). If they decide to go elsewhere, we would not hold them to the contract.
    If you want to employ someone, you ask others who have worked for them, or who have experience in their business, for references. That's what we're doing here.

    There's little point asking a press if they're competent and reputable because they're all going to say that yes, they are. So asking you directly would not have been effective. Analysing the information we have on you has revealed a few things that we weren't sure of before. It's revealed that your editing is terrible, your covers are terrible, and your website is terrible; that you don't seem to have much experience in publishing; your books aren't selling well; and you don't respond well to being asked tough questions, which suggests you might be difficult to work with.

    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    I'm not asking you to improve my company. It was a rhetorical question. I have 20 years experience running large businesses and that was before I joined the publishing industry. I asked if you only tear down something or if you actually offered constructive comments. Based on my financials, my business model is doing rather well.
    So you worked for twenty years running large businesses, and then you started work in publishing, where you've been for fifteen years. That makes thirty five years, which is about the same amount of time I've been working. Which would make you about the same age as me. I'm 54. But you look a LOT younger than me in your Facebook profile. What moisturiser do you use?

    Quote Originally Posted by WrdWvr View Post
    My experience feels like multiple lives lived simultaneously. Business wise, I've worked as an senior operations manager in the financial world, was a business manager for multiple small companies - creating budgets, business models, and running the day to day operations. In the publishing world, I started as an intern as a proofreader and editor at Bloomsbury. I worked for several smaller presses in the UK and US (editing and running daily operations). I worked with Oxford Uni Press with academic non-fiction editing.

    I knew better than to start a business without having at least 2 years capital reserves.
    If you have worked in editing for Bloomsbury and the OUP (I've never heard of it referred to as Oxford Uni Press before, and the people I know who work there always include the "the") then you should know your stuff. So why have you published books which are in such dire need of a good editor? I am sorry to be so blunt: but I've read the first ten pages or so of each of the books you've published and they are all in need of a lot of work. I couldn't let books go out into the world in such poor shape.

  25. #50
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    36
    Just to clear things up - I'm your age. Thanks for thinking so - the pic is a few years old.

    I live in the US now, but did live in the UK for many years (the pic was taken at our house in Sheffield).

    Thank you for you input. I wasn't suggesting they ask if I or anyone who works at BLP is competent. That would be ridiculous. There are questions such as how many books have you sold? What is your marketing strategy? Who do you sell through? Basic questions that any author should ask any potential publisher - no matter what is on their website.

    Have a good night.

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