AW Amazon Store

If this site is helpful to you,
Please consider a voluntary subscription to defray ongoing expenses.


 

Welcome to the AbsoluteWrite Water Cooler! Please read The Newbie Guide To Absolute Write

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 28

Thread: Has anyone read any of these?

  1. #1
    practical experience, FTW vicky271's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    433

    Cool Has anyone read any of these?

    Hey guys!
    So i'm constantly going to the bookstore and adding books to my to-read list. I never deleted the list from the last few visits. I'm currently working through Paper and Fire by Rachel Caine (sequel to Ink and Bone). The first book was INCREDIBLE (I even went out and bought it). Has anyone read these books? I'd like your opinions

    Legend of the Dragonrealm by Richard A. Knaak
    Stormdancer by Jay Kristoff
    The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks
    Uprooted by Naomi Novik - Finished
    Fools Assassin by Robin Hobb
    The Dwarves by Markus Heitz
    The Invisible Library by Genevieve Gogman
    The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss
    The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien
    The Cinder Spires series by Jim Butcher
    The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch - Tried and gave up.
    The Queen of Tearling by Eerika Johansen
    The Wolf in the Attic by Paul Kearney
    Queen of Fire by Anthony Ryan
    Godspeaker by Karen Miller
    Last Song Before Night by Ulama C. Meyer
    Ink and Bone by Rachel Caine - Finished
    Paper and Fire by Rachel Caine - Finished

    The Magician by Lev Grossman
    The Iron Assassin by Ed Greenwood
    Unholy War by David Hair
    Dragon Heart by Cecelia Holland
    The Traitor Baru Cormorant by Seth Dickinson
    The Obelisk Gate by N.K Jemisin
    Twelve Kings of Sharakhai by Bradley P. Beaulieu
    Firebrand by Gillian Phillip
    Den of Wolves by Juliet Marillier
    A Dance of Blades by David Dalglish
    The Castings Trilogy by Pamela Freeman
    Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo
    The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware
    A Dog's Purpose by W. Bruce Cameron
    The Blackthorn Key by Kevin Sands
    Dragon Keeper by Robin Hobb - Finished; waiting to read the sequel
    Last edited by vicky271; 05-23-2017 at 12:04 AM.
    Current Work of Fiction
    Nothing worth mentioning.

    Current Book Obsession
    None worth mentioning.

    Currently Reading
    Self-Editing for Fiction Writers by Renne Browne & Dave King

    Next Book...
    ------------

    Blog

    The Writer's Shelf: https://thewritersshelf.wordpress.co...ity-mindspace/

  2. #2
    Ideas bounce around in my head Jason's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    4,752
    The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks - Yes, definitely recommend!
    The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien - why are you even debating this? Must read!
    A Dog's Purpose by W. Bruce Cameron - yes, but read with a box of Kleenex

    May I also add a few?
    The Dragonbone Chair (Book 1 of the Memory, Sorrow and Thorn trilogy) - Tad Williams?
    Night Watch - Terry Pratchett
    The Narnia Series - C.S. Lewis (this is intended for young readers, but even adults can read/enjoy them - I re-read book 3 for another thread and laughed/cried all over again)
    2017 Goals
    Read 50 of these books
    Come up with a good book idea and actually write it!

  3. #3
    Just Another Lazy Perfectionist Brightdreamer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    5,363
    I've read a few of these (if you're incredibly bored, click through the link in the signature for specific and spoiler-free reviews), but I'll give my impressions.

    The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks - This was considered the first major entry in the High Fantasy category since Tolkien "created" it (or at least made it commercially viable.) It... shows, IMHO. It's not bad, but there's a tendency to lean on tropes, not to mention sexism, and it could be a bit thick going at times. Still, it has some interesting ideas, and I've heard reliable reports that the series picks up significantly as Brooks honed his writing chops (though I haven't tried them myself.) Recommended if you enjoyed Tolkien, though.

    Uprooted by Naomi Novik - A very enjoyable retelling of a Polish folktale, marred only slightly by an ending that feels a bit off for reasons I can't quite put my finger on. Overall, though, it's great fun, capturing the fairy tale feel with nicely-realized characters. Well recommended.

    The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss - I enjoyed the first book, but the MC could be a bit of an ego-fluffed Gary Stu at times, and I've heard numerous reports that the trend worsens in Book 2. But it's a slightly different take on an epic, focusing on one character rather than a sprawling world epic, and has some pretty darned good writing. Recommended overall.

    The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien - It's more or less obligatory, if you're at all interested in writing fantasy, to read Tolkien. This book was aimed at a younger audience than the LOTR trilogy/expanded stuff, and the storyteller style occasionally got on my nerves (as did the way the numerous dwarves often blended together as little more than names, plus these days the utter lack of women kinda stands out like a sore thumb), but it's a good adventure for what it is, and it's definitely worth reading to see the roots of so many fantasy tropes/cliches, not to mention the roots of many popular RPGs. Recommended.

    Ink and Bone by Rachel Caine - Definitely agree that the first was impressive, and I need to add the sequel to the TBR pile (which is already threatening to crush my in my sleep, quite literally.)
    - Brightdreamer
    Brightdreamer's Book Reviews

    "Inspiration will strike you, and leave you for dead. The police will do nothing."
    - from The Daily Humorscope

  4. #4
    climbing steps Bassel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by vicky271 View Post
    The Magician by Lev Grossman
    s
    It was a good read. Smooth language and a good story. It delves into the imaginary without overdoing it, and its main character is solid.

  5. #5
    Ideas bounce around in my head Jason's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    4,752
    Quote Originally Posted by Brightdreamer View Post
    I've read a few of these (if you're incredibly bored, click through the link in the signature for specific and spoiler-free reviews), but I'll give my impressions.

    The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks - This was considered the first major entry in the High Fantasy category since Tolkien "created" it (or at least made it commercially viable.) It... shows, IMHO. It's not bad, but there's a tendency to lean on tropes, not to mention sexism, and it could be a bit thick going at times. Still, it has some interesting ideas, and I've heard reliable reports that the series picks up significantly as Brooks honed his writing chops (though I haven't tried them myself.) Recommended if you enjoyed Tolkien, though.

    ...


    I'll echo this 100%. I cut my teeth reading Brooks for what you're classifying as "high fantasy", and literally inhaled everything he wrote in the Shannara series for about the first 10-12 installments. The writing did get better, but the stories also started to fade in their intensity, as he started to re-hash tropes in various capacities.

    The Original Trilogy
    The Sword...
    The Elfstones...
    The Wishsong...

    The Heritage
    The Scions...
    The Druid...
    The Elf Queen
    The Talismans...

    The First King...

    The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara
    Isle Witch
    Antrax
    Morgawr

    The High Druid
    Jarka Ruus
    Tanquil
    Straken

    This is about when I stopped reading, but there's more:

    The Genesis of Shannara
    Armageddon's Children
    The Elves of Cintra
    Dark Wraith of Shannara
    The Gypsy Morph

    This is where my knowledge ended as far as being able to quote the series rote (scary, eh?) Since then (according to the Wikipedia page), several others (about ten, including a few shorts) that were published after, but it had run its course for me by then...though now I may go back and look at the Paladins of Shannara 01, 02, and 03 as those are ebook shorts.

    All in all, an impressive series. After counting them up, I read 14, there were 4 more I didn't read but knew of, then another ten after that - so 28 books total! My guess is since I bought the original 14 in hardcover, I spent a couple hundred dollars on just him (and he didn't even buy me dinner afterward ).
    2017 Goals
    Read 50 of these books
    Come up with a good book idea and actually write it!

  6. #6
    I'm so fly I've got arachnophobia gothicrayguns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Second Star to the Right
    Posts
    5
    Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo - This one is the sequel to Bardugo's Six of Crows, so you'll want to read that first. Highly recommended, though, I really enjoyed them!

    The Cinder Spires series by Jim Butcher - A really cool steampunk fantasy series, definitely recommended. Butcher has a really funny, exciting voice to his writing.

    Uprooted by Naomi Novik - Absolutely, wholly and completely recommend this book, I just finished it a few weeks ago and it's one of my favorites I've read in months. Really, really cool.

  7. #7
    practical experience, FTW Phantasmagoria's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Cape Cod MA, USA
    Posts
    161
    Godspeaker by Karen Miller I've read a lot of Miller books; she's a good writer, but I do have to say that for this trilogy... it felt uncomfortably racist to me. The "bad guys" were the darker-skinned "savages" worshiping evil gods and the "good guys" were the European-analogues... I know that's not uncommon in fantasy but it's pretty blatant here. I do have to give her some kudos for writing the first book in the trilogy from the POV of the villain, as she comes into her own. She's a very interesting character in isolation, but in the context of the series, well...

    The Obelisk Gate by N.K Jemisin READ THIS!! Seriously I can't recommend Jemisin enough, especially this series. The Fifth Season is the first in the series, and The Obelisk Gate is the second. It's heartbreaking but so, so, so well written, and intriguing. But, fair warning, I do love Scott Lynch's work too, and you said you tried and gave that up, so I don't know if our tastes would match up here. Give The Fifth Season's intro a go and see what you think; I think it's available on Jemisin's website. If you're not hooked, it might not be for you.

    (And I feel like Tolkien is almost required reading if you're into fantasy... but his style definitely isn't for everyone!)

  8. #8
    Herder of Hamsters AW Admin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    On the Server
    Posts
    13,328
    Last Song Before Night is by Llana C. Meyer.

    I liked it, quite a lot.

    Also liked Novik's Uprooted.
    Last edited by AW Admin; 04-07-2017 at 02:44 AM.

  9. #9
    practical experience, FTW
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    The right earlobe of North America
    Posts
    35,876
    Quote Originally Posted by Brightdreamer View Post
    The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks - This was considered the first major entry in the High Fantasy category since Tolkien "created" it (or at least made it commercially viable.)
    By whom?

    caw

    caw
    Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it.

    -- Terry Pratchett

  10. #10
    Just Another Lazy Perfectionist Brightdreamer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    5,363
    Quote Originally Posted by blacbird View Post
    By whom?

    caw

    caw
    It was mentioned in Brooks's autobiography/writing book, Sometimes the Magic Works.
    - Brightdreamer
    Brightdreamer's Book Reviews

    "Inspiration will strike you, and leave you for dead. The police will do nothing."
    - from The Daily Humorscope

  11. #11
    practical experience, FTW
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    The right earlobe of North America
    Posts
    35,876
    So, Ursula LeGuin, Anne McCaffrey and Marion Zimmer Bradley, all of whom published highly popular Fantasy fiction years before Brooks, they don't count?

    caw
    Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it.

    -- Terry Pratchett

  12. #12
    Making magic with words arikdiver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    833
    Disclaimer: these are my opinion only, everyone will have personal reading preferences.

    The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks - I haven't read this, but I've read the Elfstones of Shannara (Book 2), which works as a stand alone. I could see similarities with Tolkien's work, but the ending of Elfstones did not inspire me to read more by Terry Brooks. I won't spoil it for those who want to actually read it.


    The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss - I kept waiting for something to happen. The writing was perfectly fine, but the story really seemed to drag.

    The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien - all time classic, the first epic fantasy I ever read. I appreciated Tolkien's world building and use of language.

    The Magician by Lev Grossman -
    The concept was interesting enough, but the main character was both depressing and annoying. The Magician has similarities to two other very famous series but with a twist which you will either love or hate. Let's just say by the end I was glad it was over.

  13. #13
    Just Another Lazy Perfectionist Brightdreamer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    5,363
    Quote Originally Posted by blacbird View Post
    So, Ursula LeGuin, Anne McCaffrey and Marion Zimmer Bradley, all of whom published highly popular Fantasy fiction years before Brooks, they don't count?

    caw
    Apologies - I should've used "epic" instead of "high."

    And to quote the Wikipidia entry on SoS: "Del Rey chose it because he felt that it was "the first long epic fantasy adventure which had any chance of meeting the demands of Tolkien readers for similar pleasures." Article/Link

    It was considered, and marketed as, the next Tolkien-level fantasy in the genre Tolkien forged/pioneered/made a popular inspiration for "Frodo Lives" graffiti with LOTR, one which - at least according to publishers, and to what I remember from Brooks's aforementioned book - had not seen an entry from a major publisher. (I cannot speak to small press or self-pubbed works that may have fallen through the cracks.) Ursula K. LeGuin, IIRC, was not writing an epic fantasy, and neither were AM or MZB. They were not marketed as Tolkien inspired or "next steps." (They were also female writers... not always given the fairest treatment.)

    I hope my reference is sufficiently explained.

    Though I still prefer Tad Williams...
    - Brightdreamer
    Brightdreamer's Book Reviews

    "Inspiration will strike you, and leave you for dead. The police will do nothing."
    - from The Daily Humorscope

  14. #14
    Perpetually in transit Helix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Far North Queensland
    Posts
    6,304
    Quote Originally Posted by blacbird View Post
    So, Ursula LeGuin, Anne McCaffrey and Marion Zimmer Bradley, all of whom published highly popular Fantasy fiction years before Brooks, they don't count?

    caw
    + (not in chronological order) Michael Moorcock, Lloyd Alexander, Hope Mirrlees, Patricia McKillop, Alan Garner, Fritz Leiber, Lord Dunsany...


  15. #15
    Just Another Lazy Perfectionist Brightdreamer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    5,363
    Quote Originally Posted by Helix View Post
    + (not in chronological order) Michael Moorcock, Lloyd Alexander, Hope Mirrlees, Patricia McKillop, Alan Garner, Fritz Leiber, Lord Dunsany...
    Previous citations and sources and explanations apparently insufficient...

    Fine.

    - Brightdreamer
    Brightdreamer's Book Reviews

    "Inspiration will strike you, and leave you for dead. The police will do nothing."
    - from The Daily Humorscope

  16. #16
    Herder of Hamsters AW Admin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    On the Server
    Posts
    13,328
    I'm old. I remember when Sword Of Shannara was first released (1977). It did start the Del Rey Fantasy line proper. It did sell a startlingly large number of copies in the first month it was published but no, it really wasn't single-handedly responsible for the post-Tolkien surge of interest in High fantasy. It did demonstrate, in part of its pastiche like qualities, that there was demand, but not so much a demand for more Brooks as a demand for non-derivative Fantasy in a Tolkienesque pseudo medieval culture.

    For one thing, a lot of people hated Shannara as a poorly handled Tolkien pastiche; it was (and is) strikingly derivative.

    There were other books and writers that, honestly, I think were more influential.

    Lloyd Alexander's Prydain Chronicles books were published from 1964 to 68; Alexander is the person who came up with the phrase "high Fantasy."

    Le Guin's Wizard of Earthsea was published in 1968. Nine Princes of Amber, the first of Roger Zelazny's multi-volume Chronicles of Amber was published in 1970. McKillip's Riddlemaster of Hed was 1976. Stephen Donaldson's Lord Fouls Bane, the first Chronicles of Thomas Covenant was 1977.

    Now, what I'm curious about but do not know, is how much influence the 1977 first publication of Tolkien's Silmarilion might have had. It's not a narrative sort of book, but man, it sure did get read and bought.

  17. #17
    practical experience, FTW Cobalt Jade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    836
    Now, what I'm curious about but do not know, is how much influence the 1977 first publication of Tolkien's Silmarilion might have had. It's not a narrative sort of book, but man, it sure did get read and bought.
    I remember its publication and publicity. It was a BIG EVENT in the publishing world, the equivalent of the Beatles getting back together.

  18. #18
    practical experience, FTW vicky271's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    433
    Quote Originally Posted by CBJason View Post
    The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks - Yes, definitely recommend!
    The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien - why are you even debating this? Must read!
    A Dog's Purpose by W. Bruce Cameron - yes, but read with a box of Kleenex

    May I also add a few?
    The Dragonbone Chair (Book 1 of the Memory, Sorrow and Thorn trilogy) - Tad Williams?
    Night Watch - Terry Pratchett
    The Narnia Series - C.S. Lewis (this is intended for young readers, but even adults can read/enjoy them - I re-read book 3 for another thread and laughed/cried all over again)
    Perfect! I've added The Dragonbone Chair and Night Watch to my list via your recommendation (despite my tendency to avoid stories centring around war/possibility of war/war raging).
    I always hesitate when starting popular fiction. I attempted the C.S Lewis books. Loved the story, but i wasn't a fan of the writing style. Maybe i'll try again.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brightdreamer View Post
    I've read a few of these (if you're incredibly bored, click through the link in the signature for specific and spoiler-free reviews), but I'll give my impressions.

    The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks - This was considered the first major entry in the High Fantasy category since Tolkien "created" it (or at least made it commercially viable.) It... shows, IMHO. It's not bad, but there's a tendency to lean on tropes, not to mention sexism, and it could be a bit thick going at times. Still, it has some interesting ideas, and I've heard reliable reports that the series picks up significantly as Brooks honed his writing chops (though I haven't tried them myself.) Recommended if you enjoyed Tolkien, though.

    Uprooted by Naomi Novik - A very enjoyable retelling of a Polish folktale, marred only slightly by an ending that feels a bit off for reasons I can't quite put my finger on. Overall, though, it's great fun, capturing the fairy tale feel with nicely-realized characters. Well recommended.

    The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss - I enjoyed the first book, but the MC could be a bit of an ego-fluffed Gary Stu at times, and I've heard numerous reports that the trend worsens in Book 2. But it's a slightly different take on an epic, focusing on one character rather than a sprawling world epic, and has some pretty darned good writing. Recommended overall.

    The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien - It's more or less obligatory, if you're at all interested in writing fantasy, to read Tolkien. This book was aimed at a younger audience than the LOTR trilogy/expanded stuff, and the storyteller style occasionally got on my nerves (as did the way the numerous dwarves often blended together as little more than names, plus these days the utter lack of women kinda stands out like a sore thumb), but it's a good adventure for what it is, and it's definitely worth reading to see the roots of so many fantasy tropes/cliches, not to mention the roots of many popular RPGs. Recommended.

    Ink and Bone by Rachel Caine - Definitely agree that the first was impressive, and I need to add the sequel to the TBR pile (which is already threatening to crush my in my sleep, quite literally.)
    I've heard some terrible reviews concerning the writing style in Uprooted. Hence the hesitation. But you guys seem to like it. So I'll give it a whirl!

    Quote Originally Posted by Bassel View Post
    It was a good read. Smooth language and a good story. It delves into the imaginary without overdoing it, and its main character is solid.
    Perfect ^^

    Quote Originally Posted by CBJason View Post
    [/I]
    I'll echo this 100%. I cut my teeth reading Brooks for what you're classifying as "high fantasy", and literally inhaled everything he wrote in the Shannara series for about the first 10-12 installments. The writing did get better, but the stories also started to fade in their intensity, as he started to re-hash tropes in various capacities.

    The Original Trilogy
    The Sword...
    The Elfstones...
    The Wishsong...

    The Heritage
    The Scions...
    The Druid...
    The Elf Queen
    The Talismans...

    The First King...

    The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara
    Isle Witch
    Antrax
    Morgawr

    The High Druid
    Jarka Ruus
    Tanquil
    Straken

    This is about when I stopped reading, but there's more:

    The Genesis of Shannara
    Armageddon's Children
    The Elves of Cintra
    Dark Wraith of Shannara
    The Gypsy Morph

    This is where my knowledge ended as far as being able to quote the series rote (scary, eh?) Since then (according to the Wikipedia page), several others (about ten, including a few shorts) that were published after, but it had run its course for me by then...though now I may go back and look at the Paladins of Shannara 01, 02, and 03 as those are ebook shorts.

    All in all, an impressive series. After counting them up, I read 14, there were 4 more I didn't read but knew of, then another ten after that - so 28 books total! My guess is since I bought the original 14 in hardcover, I spent a couple hundred dollars on just him (and he didn't even buy me dinner afterward ).
    Oh wow! Thanks for all the information ^^ Gosh, you guys are giving me so much reading to do! I have high expectations for all these!

    Quote Originally Posted by gothicrayguns View Post
    Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo - This one is the sequel to Bardugo's Six of Crows, so you'll want to read that first. Highly recommended, though, I really enjoyed them!

    The Cinder Spires series by Jim Butcher - A really cool steampunk fantasy series, definitely recommended. Butcher has a really funny, exciting voice to his writing.

    Uprooted by Naomi Novik - Absolutely, wholly and completely recommend this book, I just finished it a few weeks ago and it's one of my favorites I've read in months. Really, really cool.
    It's on my list of books to read!

    Quote Originally Posted by Phantasmagoria View Post
    Godspeaker by Karen Miller I've read a lot of Miller books; she's a good writer, but I do have to say that for this trilogy... it felt uncomfortably racist to me. The "bad guys" were the darker-skinned "savages" worshiping evil gods and the "good guys" were the European-analogues... I know that's not uncommon in fantasy but it's pretty blatant here. I do have to give her some kudos for writing the first book in the trilogy from the POV of the villain, as she comes into her own. She's a very interesting character in isolation, but in the context of the series, well...

    The Obelisk Gate by N.K Jemisin READ THIS!! Seriously I can't recommend Jemisin enough, especially this series. The Fifth Season is the first in the series, and The Obelisk Gate is the second. It's heartbreaking but so, so, so well written, and intriguing. But, fair warning, I do love Scott Lynch's work too, and you said you tried and gave that up, so I don't know if our tastes would match up here. Give The Fifth Season's intro a go and see what you think; I think it's available on Jemisin's website. If you're not hooked, it might not be for you.

    (And I feel like Tolkien is almost required reading if you're into fantasy... but his style definitely isn't for everyone!)
    That's interesting. I'd like to know what Karen Miller is trying to say. Needless to say, my novel has some form of indirect racism involved (positively enforcing individuals to be aware of its existence, and fight it (even with the smallest actions)) so i'll give it a read...even if her book is emphasizing something opposite. Thanks for the heads up!

    Omigosh, i wanna read it now!! :O :O

    Quote Originally Posted by AW Admin View Post
    Last Song Before Night is by Llana C. Meyer.

    I liked it, quite a lot.

    Also liked Novik's Uprooted.
    Quote Originally Posted by arikdiver View Post
    Disclaimer: these are my opinion only, everyone will have personal reading preferences.

    The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks - I haven't read this, but I've read the Elfstones of Shannara (Book 2), which works as a stand alone. I could see similarities with Tolkien's work, but the ending of Elfstones did not inspire me to read more by Terry Brooks. I won't spoil it for those who want to actually read it.


    The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss - I kept waiting for something to happen. The writing was perfectly fine, but the story really seemed to drag.

    The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien - all time classic, the first epic fantasy I ever read. I appreciated Tolkien's world building and use of language.

    The Magician by Lev Grossman -
    The concept was interesting enough, but the main character was both depressing and annoying. The Magician has similarities to two other very famous series but with a twist which you will either love or hate. Let's just say by the end I was glad it was over.
    That seems to be a common complaint with The Magician.

    Quote Originally Posted by AW Admin View Post
    I'm old. I remember when Sword Of Shannara was first released (1977). It did start the Del Rey Fantasy line proper. It did sell a startlingly large number of copies in the first month it was published but no, it really wasn't single-handedly responsible for the post-Tolkien surge of interest in High fantasy. It did demonstrate, in part of its pastiche like qualities, that there was demand, but not so much a demand for more Brooks as a demand for non-derivative Fantasy in a Tolkienesque pseudo medieval culture.

    For one thing, a lot of people hated Shannara as a poorly handled Tolkien pastiche; it was (and is) strikingly derivative.

    There were other books and writers that, honestly, I think were more influential.

    Lloyd Alexander's Prydain Chronicles books were published from 1964 to 68; Alexander is the person who came up with the phrase "high Fantasy."

    Le Guin's Wizard of Earthsea was published in 1968. Nine Princes of Amber, the first of Roger Zelazny's multi-volume Chronicles of Amber was published in 1970. McKillip's Riddlemaster of Hed was 1976. Stephen Donaldson's Lord Fouls Bane, the first Chronicles of Thomas Covenant was 1977.

    Now, what I'm curious about but do not know, is how much influence the 1977 first publication of Tolkien's Silmarilion might have had. It's not a narrative sort of book, but man, it sure did get read and bought.
    I love your writing style I'll look those books up and add them to my "to-read" list!
    Last edited by vicky271; 04-12-2017 at 12:51 AM.
    Current Work of Fiction
    Nothing worth mentioning.

    Current Book Obsession
    None worth mentioning.

    Currently Reading
    Self-Editing for Fiction Writers by Renne Browne & Dave King

    Next Book...
    ------------

    Blog

    The Writer's Shelf: https://thewritersshelf.wordpress.co...ity-mindspace/

  19. #19
    figuring it all out
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Directly over the center of the Earth
    Posts
    84
    Quote Originally Posted by AW Admin View Post
    I'm old. I remember when Sword Of Shannara was first released (1977). It did start the Del Rey Fantasy line proper. It did sell a startlingly large number of copies in the first month it was published but no, it really wasn't single-handedly responsible for the post-Tolkien surge of interest in High fantasy. It did demonstrate, in part of its pastiche like qualities, that there was demand, but not so much a demand for more Brooks as a demand for non-derivative Fantasy in a Tolkienesque pseudo medieval culture.

    For one thing, a lot of people hated Shannara as a poorly handled Tolkien pastiche; it was (and is) strikingly derivative.

    There were other books and writers that, honestly, I think were more influential.

    Lloyd Alexander's Prydain Chronicles books were published from 1964 to 68; Alexander is the person who came up with the phrase "high Fantasy."

    Le Guin's Wizard of Earthsea was published in 1968. Nine Princes of Amber, the first of Roger Zelazny's multi-volume Chronicles of Amber was published in 1970. McKillip's Riddlemaster of Hed was 1976. Stephen Donaldson's Lord Fouls Bane, the first Chronicles of Thomas Covenant was 1977.

    Now, what I'm curious about but do not know, is how much influence the 1977 first publication of Tolkien's Silmarilion might have had. It's not a narrative sort of book, but man, it sure did get read and bought.
    It surely sold well-I got my copy for Christmas that year. It's funny-I know that Tolkein consciously set out to manufacture an epic tradition for the English (as if the Arthurian cycle weren't enough) but I wonder if he did not grow his entire high fantasy cosmos out of a single arresting image. I'm certain anyone who has ever read the Silmarilion remembers it: It's the brief passage where Beren stands before the elf-king and quietly announces "Even now I hold a silmaril in my hand."

  20. #20
    practical experience, FTW kaylim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    180
    I dunno. I personally thought the Sword of Shannara was absolute garbage. I read 500 pages and I was like "why am I still reading this" and shut the book.

    I would suggest reading 'The Once and Future King' though if fantasy is your thing.
    Last edited by kaylim; 05-14-2017 at 02:13 AM.

  21. #21
    practical experience, FTW autumnleaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    small rainy island
    Posts
    850
    Quote Originally Posted by vicky271 View Post
    The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss
    I gave up a quarter of the way through, because the narrator was annoying me that much. I may be a minority opinion on this.

    Quote Originally Posted by vicky271 View Post
    The Wolf in the Attic by Paul Kearney
    I liked this: a pleasant read with an engaging main character and good period details. Tolkien and CS Lewis make a brief appearance.
    https://taleswildatlantic.wordpress.com/
    I reject your reality and substitute my own
    ~ Adam Savage, Mythbusters

  22. #22
    figuring it all out airandarkness's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    75
    I read The Queen of the Tearling and loved it. I enjoyed the whole trilogy quite a lot, though I did find the very, very end...quite disappointing. But others may disagree, so I would still recommend checking it out. It didn't ruin the experience for me, and I would even read (at least) the first book again, I think.

  23. #23
    Lost In The Realms RaiscaraAvalon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    The Backwoods Of Maine
    Posts
    938
    I'll second or third the nomination of the Dragonbone Chair! And Terry Brooks is one of my go to authors, so I'm biased towards him. The Hobbit was good too - the rest, never even heard of them!
    ~*You are responsible for your own experience*~
    Amazon Author Page
    My Blog
    My Patreon
    Twitter
    Facebook Page
    ~*Don't compromise yourself, you're all you've got. - Janis Joplin*~
    The Emperor's Bride (Fantasy/Romance) ~ 33,011/100,000
    House Of Dolls (Horror) ~ 13/80,000
    The Forest Family Saga (SciFi/Fantasy) ~ 1,051/100,000


  24. #24
    figuring it all out airandarkness's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    75
    FYI, for anyone interested in The Dragonbone Chair, the ebook is on sale today for 1.99. At least in the U.S., not sure about anywhere else.

  25. #25
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin Gabriela Jessica's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Why do you want to know?
    Posts
    33
    I love Gentleman Bastard series. Too bad you couldn't enjoy it.
    I am currently working on my first series.

    Check my social medias:
    Twitter: if you want to listen to my daily rambling.
    Facebook: for no reason.
    Blog: if you want to see my reviews.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Custom Search