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Thread: Goals for an Aspiring Writer: "Required Reading"

  1. #1
    Ideas bounce around in my head CBJason's Avatar
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    Goals for an Aspiring Writer: "Required Reading"

    There's an axiom that says the more you read, the better you write (or something like that LOL). So, in the interests of that idea, as an aspiring writer, I am purchasing a Kindle with some Christmas money, and have set myself a goal of reading at least 50 books (ideally 100 in the spirit of this thread) in 2017.

    However, I'd like to focus my efforts on some of the more quintessential works. I've read a few in either high school or college, but believe re-reading them as an adult will help me more in the long run. That being said, I am afraid my non-English major and limited exposure in high school to extensive reading requirements has not served me well. So, I am opening a new thread to get suggestions from the community for what would be a good foundation of "required reading" (kind of like a college course if you will indulge me )

    Please feel free to add as many 5 of your own titles so I can hopefully get a good cross-section from the diverse group that is AW! If this list surpasses the 100 mark, that's fine, as I will just add to my goals for the following years. No genre is off limits, nor topic or length...thanks in advance, and I can't wait to hear what everyone's ideas are!

    ETA: In order to clarify in light of Brightdreamer's first post (and thank you for taking the plunge in going first btw! ) - and to expand on what I am looking for in the way of suggestions, perhaps "quintessential" was a bit of a misnomer. Classics and canon works are originally what I had in mind when I started thinking about this goal/task for 2017, but to exclude modern tastes and times would be rather silly since my goal is to become more well-read, and to expand both my mind and horizons. If you'll pardon the pun, consider my mind "an open book" when it comes to suggestions.

    My interests lie primarily within the realm of fiction, but that does not mean non-fiction is off the table. I'd asked the same question of my father yesterday, and he said "What do you mean - of book's I've read, or of books in general? Important authors that have had important things to say, or do you want books that have also been just good reading, even though it may not be part of the traditional 'canon'?" So, with that in mind, I would ask that suggestions be posed for reading material based on books you personally have read., regardless of whether they are "canon" quality...

    Quote Originally Posted by Brightdreamer View Post
    By "quintessential", do you mean the classics and "canon" works?...
    It might help to know what area you're looking to read more in, or stuff you just can't stand for whatever reason....
    You're first post is exactly on point with what I am looking for - Title, author, and (optionally) a sentence or two of why you like it - so again, tyvm!
    Last edited by CBJason; 11-26-2016 at 09:12 AM.

  2. #2
    Just Another Lazy Perfectionist Brightdreamer's Avatar
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    By "quintessential", do you mean the classics and "canon" works? I believe there are lists of canon via Google - though I believe it's somewhere distinctly north of 100 titles. And, while there's plenty of value in reading canon works, they aren't necessarily reflective of modern times and tastes. Unless you're writing literary fiction for a very specific audience (readers devoted to canon works), you might want to broaden the net to include stuff that may not have made the official cut, but is still influential (and just plain good.)

    It might help to know what area you're looking to read more in, or stuff you just can't stand for whatever reason. (I know you mentioned no genre being off-limits, but some people have their triggers, so I figured I'd ask to be sure.)

    That said, some random suggestions - many relatively new compared to canon works:

    1 - Water for Elephants, by Sara Gruen. Not only was it originally created as a NaNoWriMo effort, but it vividly evokes the lost world of train circuses... plus it has about the best, most satisfying endings (present and past) of any book.

    2 - Pretty much anything by Terry Pratchett. It's not just humor - his stories have real bite to them when you look beyond the surface. Small Gods, for instance, has a lot to say about religion and what humans can do with its power.

    3 - The Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, worth studying for his memorable characters. (The Hound of the Baskervilles is the best of the book-length tales; A Study in Scarlet is decent, but has a massive flashback/derail in the middle.) His Lost World also has memorable characters, but Holmes is more iconic...

    4 - Either of Tad Williams's epic fantasy series (The Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn trilogy or the Shadowmarch quartet.) The MST books partially inspired GRRM's A Song of Ice and Fire saga (which I'd also recommend, though not so much if you aren't a fan of epics or are new to the genre - TW's more digestible and, though it has a large cast and sprawling map, isn't quite so drawn out or convoluted or depressing), and the Shadowmarch books are epic on an even larger scale, with some very interesting takes on gods and faeries. (If you've tried and rejected Tolkien, this will give you a look at the more modern face of the genre, which doesn't read so thick and archaic.)

    5 - The Bartimaeus books by Jonathan Stroud, particularly the main trilogy (starting with The Amulet of Samarkand.) Very imaginative alternate-modern fantasy world, with an absolutely hilarious djinn. I throw it out not only because it's an amusing series, but because it's an excellent one, and a demonstration that Harry Potter isn't the only "good" thing about MG/YA fantasy literature these days.

    (Honorable mentions would be too numerous to count, including Ray Bradbury for lyrical prose, Gary Paulsen for evoking the spirit of the wilderness, Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels for a surprisingly relevant commentary on human failings written before the American Revolution, Brandon Sanderson for what he's done with "hard" fantasy ideas...)
    Last edited by Brightdreamer; 11-26-2016 at 08:40 AM.
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  3. #3
    I write CathleenT's Avatar
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    Hmm, for classics, maybe take a peep at A Christmas Carol. It's a perennial favorite, and worth studying for why and how, even though omni with a strong voice is unfashionable right now.

    Also classic--Pride and Prejudice or Sense and Sensibility. Austen wrote others, but the two plots used here are some of the most accessible if you ever want to write a love story as a subplot. Or even a whole romance. Plus they're free, which never hurts.

    LOTR. The Hobbit first if you don't mind kid lit and authorial voice.

    Personally, I find Pratchett's early work bland. I know of some people who start at the beginning with Rincewind and wonder why everyone thinks he's so great. My favorite is Night Watch. Small Gods, just IMO, is where I really think he got into his stride, although Mort is probably the earliest book I'd recommend.

    Mitchener wrote some wildly popular historical fiction, but the intros of some of his longer stuff can get intense. I'd stick to his shorter works.

    And Shakespeare. My favorites are Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, and Julius Caesar, although there is little consensus here. Midsummer Night's Dream is also popular, as is The Tempest and Macbeth. Better yet, go find some production in your area, either high school or community college. Lots of them are available on DVD, too. If you watch Hamlet, be sure to check out Rosencrantz and Gildensturn (not sure about the spelling, but it should be close enough for Google to figure out).

    Bonus book if you don't mind older language and like tales of derring-do: Ivanhoe.

    All the older stuff will be free on Kindle, so that will keep the price down, too.
    Last edited by CathleenT; 11-27-2016 at 12:50 AM.

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  4. #4
    Ideas bounce around in my head CBJason's Avatar
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    Thanks! Thus far here's the list:

    • Water for Elephants, Sara Gruen
    • Small Gods, Terry Pratchett
    • Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    • The Memory, Sorrow & Thorn Trilogy, Tad Williams
    • Bartimaeus books, Jonathan Stroud
    • A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens
    • Pride & Prejudice, Jane Austen
    • LOTR, JRR Tolkein
    • Night Watch, Terry Pratchett
    • Rascals In Paradise, James Mitchener
    • Much Ado About Nothing, William Shakespeare

  5. #5
    I write CathleenT's Avatar
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    If you're picking Mitchener at random, I'd recommend The Bridges at Toko-Ri or possibly Space. It really depends where your interests lie. Poland is pretty good, too, but it's longer. The good news is unless you must read on a kindle, lots of his stuff can be found in used book stores. I figure, the guy has died now, so he's not getting the money anyway. And I bought enough hard copies during the Eighties and Nineties for both of us.

    Another book you might consider, since it's become historical fiction now, and it really formed a new sub-genre (techno-thriller), is Tom Clancy's Hunt for Red October. It's an excellent thriller, even better than the movie, although the latter is definitely worth watching, too.

    And for cozy mysteries, you might want to check out something by Agatha Christie. Murder on the Orient Express is worth the read. It has a different feel than the Sherlock Holmes tales.

    I can rattle on about books for a long time. I'll shut up now.
    Last edited by CathleenT; 11-27-2016 at 07:27 PM.

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  6. #6
    Ideas bounce around in my head CBJason's Avatar
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    Heh, I've read quite a few of Clancy's books - THFRO being one of the first ones I ever dug into. As to the movie, one of Harrison Ford's better appearances (though nothing beats Han Solo and Indiana Jones for him imho). Good call about adding Agatha Christie too. Had not thought of her yet. Keep the suggestions coming - never mind the 5 book limit LOL

  7. #7
    Escapist, Dreamer, etc lizzieamy's Avatar
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    Ooh, I like questions like this and anything that makes me reflect on all the books I've read. It's interesting to figure out which works have shaped you most as both a writer and a reader. Mine might be quite a random mix as I tend to jump around quite a lot. Let me think...

    1. Okay, first I've got to go for The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster. My mum read it to me when I was younger and I've reread it many times since then. To me, it is the essential children's book for anyone that loves words - and the more times I read it, the more I enjoy it. It has so many clever puns and it twists everyday phrases into magical creatures and places. I can't really explain it too well, and it's definitely more fun to jump into it yourself!

    2. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov. It might not be everyone's top choice - but that opening is the most lyrical and intoxicating one I can think of, and it has stuck with me so much I can almost recite it word for word. I lose myself in his writing every time, and though I know I could never write in the same way (or on the same topics!), it reminds me why I love putting sentences together, and playing with the wording until the rhythm is just right.

    3. 1984 by George Orwell. One of the original (and one of the best) stories set in a dystopian society. In these times we should remind ourselves of the importance of independent thinking and free speech, and giving everyone a voice. I can't think of a more quintessential novel, so many terms and ideas used in it have become a part of pop culture today.

    4. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini, for a more modern choice. I remember getting so sucked into the story I refused to do anything else. I can't explain why I loved it so much, except it felt so vivid and real. The writing was good and the story was better. I was very interested in the way the protagonist was not a traditionally strong character and made huge mistakes and showed weakness that changed the course of the story. It showed me how compelling a character like this could be. I think it also opened me up to a whole world of books and encouraged me to read stories set in other places, and the importance of doing this.

    5. A Song of Ice and Fire by George R R Martin - okay, I'm not suggesting that everyone reads the entire series, but I think at least try the first and see if it is for you. I would have put Lord of the Rings as my first choice for fantasy but I see it is already on the list! ASOIAF is obviously massive in scope and deals with so many different points of view that if any writer is attempting to do multiple POV this is the story I'd suggest. The writing can be clunky at times but I'll be damned if GRRM can't suck me in and get me invested in his characters. Also, it is so different from LOTR and I can't see Tolkein in it at all which can be a real achievement for modern fantasy. I had to include it because it comes down to the long term fight of good against evil and I think, as writers, this is the thing we are ultimately trying to deal with.

    Wow okay, that took a lot longer than I expected and was so difficult to narrow down. I'd like to second Murder on the Orient Express and add The Tempest to the list of Shakespeare's. This just popped into my head but The Wasp Factory by Iain Banks is one of the weirdest books I've ever read and that might win it a space on my list.

  8. #8
    Ideas bounce around in my head CBJason's Avatar
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    Awesome additions, though you picked one book I literally just finished reading - 1984...lol, feel free to add another if you like:
    • Water for Elephants, Sara Gruen
    • Small Gods, Terry Pratchett
    • Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    • The Memory, Sorrow & Thorn Trilogy, Tad Williams
    • Bartimaeus books, Jonathan Stroud
    • A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens
    • Pride & Prejudice, Jane Austen
    • LOTR, JRR Tolkein
    • Night Watch, Terry Pratchett
    • Rascals In Paradise, James Mitchener
    • Much Ado About Nothing, William Shakespeare
    • The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
    • Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
    • The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
    • A Song of Ice and Fire by George R R Martin

  9. #9
    Escapist, Dreamer, etc lizzieamy's Avatar
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    Haha, that's weird - what did you think of it?

    If you enjoyed then a good next read (if you haven't got to it yet) would be Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, so I will add this to the list

  10. #10
    Ideas bounce around in my head CBJason's Avatar
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    A bit scary given the timeliness of the recent election, although makes sense in the aftermath of the Depression and WW II when Orwell was writing it. Adding Brave New World (read it in high school but have likely forgotten half of it lol):

    • Water for Elephants, Sara Gruen
    • Small Gods, Terry Pratchett
    • Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    • The Memory, Sorrow & Thorn Trilogy, Tad Williams
    • Bartimaeus books, Jonathan Stroud
    • A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens
    • Pride & Prejudice, Jane Austen
    • LOTR, JRR Tolkein
    • Night Watch, Terry Pratchett
    • Rascals In Paradise, James Mitchener
    • Much Ado About Nothing, William Shakespeare
    • The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
    • Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
    • The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
    • A Song of Ice and Fire by George R R Martin
    • Brave New World, Aldous Huxley

  11. #11
    practical experience, FTW sohalt's Avatar
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    1) Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë.
    2) To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf.
    3) The Bloody Chamber, Angela Carter.
    4) We Have Always Lived in the Castle, Shirley Jackson.
    5) Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel

  12. #12
    E Conchis Omnia Helix's Avatar
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    Frankenstein -- Mary Shelley
    Left Hand of Darkness -- Ursula Le Guin
    All the short stories of James Tiptree Jr (Alice Sheldon)
    Rebecca -- Daphne du Maurier
    Poisonwood Bible -- Barbara Kingsolver
    She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted.

  13. #13
    practical experience, FTW remister's Avatar
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    1. To Kill a Mockingbird (Harper Lee)-- the only compulsory reading in high school that i really loved. I hated Shakesbloodyspeare
    2. Norwegian Wood (Murakami)-- very strange melancholy writing that I normally hate but Murakami makes it work. Really well.
    3. Charmed Life (Dianna Wynne Jones)-- Actually I love most her books, but this would be a good place to start MG Fantasy.
    4. A tangle of Knots (Lisa Graff)-- MG magical realism
    5. Chocolat (Joanne Harris)

    That's all for now.

  14. #14
    Ideas bounce around in my head CBJason's Avatar
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    Okay, now we're talking! This list is getting pretty long with titles/authors I've not read before - and that's a good thing!
    • Water for Elephants, Sara Gruen
    • Small Gods, Terry Pratchett
    • Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    • The Memory, Sorrow & Thorn Trilogy, Tad Williams
    • Bartimaeus books, Jonathan Stroud
    • A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens
    • Pride & Prejudice, Jane Austen
    • LOTR, JRR Tolkein
    • Night Watch, Terry Pratchett
    • Rascals In Paradise, James Mitchener
    • Much Ado About Nothing, William Shakespeare
    • The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
    • Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
    • The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
    • A Song of Ice and Fire by George R R Martin
    • Brave New World, Aldous Huxley
    • Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë.
    • To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf.
    • The Bloody Chamber, Angela Carter.
    • We Have Always Lived in the Castle, Shirley Jackson.
    • Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel
    • Frankenstein, Mary Shelley
    • Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula Le Guin
    • All the short stories of James Tiptree Jr (Alice Sheldon)
    • Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier
    • Poisonwood Bible, Barbara Kingsolver
    • To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
    • Norwegian Wood, Murakami
    • Charmed Life, Dianna Wynne Jones
    • A tangle of Knots, Lisa Graff
    • Chocolat, Joanne Harris


    For those keeping track, we're at 31 reads now (not counting trilogies like LOTR, Tad Williams, and the Short Stories of Alice Sheldon - singling each out here easily puts us over 50, but keep 'em coming!)

    ETA: Apologies to sohalt, my copy/paste skills apparently need work...yours are back in where they belong
    Last edited by CBJason; 11-29-2016 at 07:43 PM.

  15. #15
    practical experience, FTW sohalt's Avatar
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    What about mine?

  16. #16
    Ideas bounce around in my head CBJason's Avatar
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    Sorry sohalt - I copy/paste them into Excel and must've been going too quick - added back in from Excel

  17. #17
    Ideas bounce around in my head CBJason's Avatar
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    Would love more suggested reading - anyone?
    2017 Goals
    Read 50 of these books
    Finish my first book
    My blog: http://planet-fiction.com

  18. #18
    practical experience, FTW RightHoJeeves's Avatar
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    The Old Man & The Sea - Ernest Hemingway
    Being judgemental must surely be one of the most joyful activities known to the species and it is cruel that other animals are denied this pleasure.

    @guerre_stellari

  19. #19
    Just Another Lazy Perfectionist Brightdreamer's Avatar
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    If you're still taking suggestions, a few more random ones:

    - The Virginian, by Owen Wister. A classic Western written just as the "real" Western era was drawing to a close. A bit slow and wandery at times, but overall it holds up pretty well, evoking a lost era, and the Virginian (who is never named in the book) is a classic character.

    - The One and Only Ivan, by Katherine Applegate. An MG title based on the real story of Ivan, a gorilla who lived in a shopping mall for far too much of his life, it shows what can be done with seemingly simple prose. It reads fast, but it lingers.

    - His Majesty's Dragon (Temeraire in UK), by Naomi Novik. Alt-history Napoleonic wars with sapient dragons serving as living airships. It demonstrates that fantasy doesn't necessarily need magic, plus it does a great job evoking the period while integrating dragon-based warfare. The second book, if you get that far, really opens up the world beyond England and France, and shows an entire planet reimagined based on how nations treat the dragons in their midst. (I personally felt the series quality dropped off towards the end of the 9-book run, but YMMV.)

    - Red Mars, by Kim Stanley Robinson. The first of a trilogy (only read Book 1, myself), it begins humanity's saga colonizing the red planet - a saga in which human nature, its strengths and failings, plays at least as important a role as technological innovations. I'm not usually a techie/science person, but this one mostly held my interest, creating that "sense of wonder" on a planetary scale. (On a related note, I also highly enjoyed The Martian by Andy Weir - also more science than I usually enjoy, but Weir keeps it interesting and entertaining. The movie was reasonably faithful, but condensed a fair bit. If you had to pick one, I'd go with Weir's book for pulling you in and not letting go.)
    - Brightdreamer
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  20. #20
    Ideas bounce around in my head CBJason's Avatar
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    Yes, still taking suggestions. I'd like to have 100 to read, and if the count goes over, then any extra would just spill into 2018!
    2017 Goals
    Read 50 of these books
    Finish my first book
    My blog: http://planet-fiction.com

  21. #21
    Herder of Hamsters
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    In terms of canon literature in English, absolutely positively look for Norton Critical Editions.

    They're editions of classical texts, in English and translations, by respected scholars that include a nicely readable text, helpful footnotes, introductions, and a collection of background essays and critical essays. I love them so very much.

    They include a number of Shakespeare plays, canon English and American novels, lots of poetry, etc. Best editions of Moby Dick and Tristram Shandy, ever.

  22. #22
    Evil, undead Chihuahua SuperModerator Haggis's Avatar
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    If you're looking for shorts too, I'd recommend A Dog's Tale by Mark Twain, To Build a Fire, by Jack London, An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, by Ambrose Bierce, The Ransom of Red Chief, by O. Henry, and every other damn story you can get your hands on.
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  23. #23
    figuring it all out
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    I see that 1984 and Brave New World have already been mentioned, as well as many other greats such as Lord of the Rings. I would also add:

    * Animal Farm by George Orwell

    * Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

    * East of Eden by John Steinbeck

    The Steinbeck novel in particular has some of the best and most compelling writing that I've ever read. I think any modern collection should include at least something from Steinbeck. But hey, maybe that's just me!

    As for non-canon books that have left a lasting impression on me, I also enjoyed these:

    * Starship Troopers by Robert A. Heinlein. This is a military science fiction work that presents some interesting theory on citizenship, duty, and government propaganda. Also of note is the movie by the same name. The movie, interestingly enough, was made in order to mock the ideas put forth in the book. Since the book and the movie are at odds with each other, it's interesting to read and watch the "same" story from such opposing viewpoints.

    * The World According to Garp by John Irving. It took me years to figure out whether I even liked this book or not. But it stuck with me and I finally reread it this year. In my opinion, this book is clearly written for authors. So as an author, you may appreciate it. It's got some strong ideas on writing that I find affecting my own writing. So yeah, I have to recommend.

    Looks like you've got a great list going. Enjoy your reading!

  24. #24
    watching The Office again Ellis Clover's Avatar
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    These are some of my 'top shelf' books (where i keep my favourites), I hope you enjoy if you decide to add them to your list:

    1. Wonder Boys - Michael Chabon
    2. The Death of Ruth - Elizabeth Kata
    3. Endless Night - Agatha Christie (my personal favourite of hers)
    4. Misery - Stephen King
    5. The Slap - Christos Tsiolkas
    WIP #1: Track (Mystery/Thriller) 95k/90k - resting
    WIP #2: Tumble Down (Mainstream/Contemporary) - 20K/75K
    WIP #3: Stumps (Mystery/Thriller) - plotting

    Real estate was an industry she’d taken for granted would be a buzz. It was paid performance art, wasn’t it? And she'd loved it at first, passionately loved it – the agents’ shiny faces and newsreader voices, the pompous excesses of its ads, its innate base soullessness – back when she’d assumed everyone was in on the joke.
    - Tumble Down

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  25. #25
    Ideas bounce around in my head CBJason's Avatar
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    Awesome suggestions/additions all, updated list:

    • Water for Elephants - Sara Gruen
    • Small Gods - Terry Pratchett
    • Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    • The Memory Sorrow & Thorn Trilogy - Tad Williams
    • Bartimaeus books - Jonathan Stroud
    • A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
    • Pride & Prejudice - Jane Austen
    • Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkein
    • Night Watch - Terry Pratchett
    • Rascals In Paradise - James Mitchener
    • Much Ado About Nothing - William Shakespeare
    • The Phantom Tollbooth - Norton Juster
    • Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
    • The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
    • A Song of Ice and Fire - George R R Martin
    • Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
    • Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
    • To The Lighthouse - Virginia Woolf
    • The Bloody Chamber - Angela Carter
    • We Have Always Lived in the Castle - Shirley Jackson
    • Wolf Hall - Hilary Mantel
    • Frankenstein - Mary Shelley
    • Left Hand of Darkness - Ursula Le Guin
    • All the short stories - James Tiptree Jr (Alice Sheldon)
    • Rebecca - Daphne du Maurier
    • Poisonwood Bible - Barbara Kingsolver
    • To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
    • Norwegian Wood - Murakami
    • Charmed Life - Dianna Wynne Jones
    • A tangle of Knots - Lisa Graff
    • Chocolat - Joanne Harris
    • The Old Man and The Sea - Ernest Hemingway
    • The Virginian - Owen Wister
    • The One and Only Ivan - Katherine Applegate
    • His Majesty's Dragon - Naomi Novik
    • Red Mars - Kim Stanely Dragon
    • A Dog's Tale - Mark Twain
    • To Build a Fire - Jack London
    • An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge - Ambrose Pierce
    • The Ransom of Red Chief - O' Henry
    • Animal Farm - George Orwell
    • Farenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury
    • East of Eden - John Steinbeck
    • Starship Troopers - Robert Heinlein
    • The World According to Garp - John Irving
    • Wonder Boys - Michael Chabon
    • The Death of Ruth - Elizabeth Kata
    • Endless Night - Agatha Christie
    • Misery - Stephen King
    • The Slap - Christos Tsiolkas


    For those keeping track, we're at the half century mark (excluding series, and trilogies). And as per AW Admin's suggestion, the Norton Critical Editions have been bolded where available (I've not had a chance to go through the list exhaustively, but think I got them all thus far... ) Keep 'em coming!
    Last edited by CBJason; 12-03-2016 at 02:12 AM.
    2017 Goals
    Read 50 of these books
    Finish my first book
    My blog: http://planet-fiction.com

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