Buy books by AWers

If this site is helpful to you,
Please consider a voluntary subscription to defray ongoing expenses.


 

Welcome to the AbsoluteWrite Water Cooler! Please read The Newbie Guide To Absolute Write

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 51 to 66 of 66

Thread: Scariest scene in a movie? (Spoiler alert)

  1. #51
    When I was a kid, the movie that scared me the most was Who Framed Roger Rabbit? I had nightmares about steamrollers for years. YEARS.

    More recently, there's The Ring. I still can't be alone in a room with a staticky television. It still gets to me. Also, the lawnmower scene in Sinister. Egads. Even the soundtrack is horrifying.
    Last edited by Rhoda Nightingale; 10-23-2016 at 06:32 PM. Reason: Coding fail.
    BETA-ING: Cave Draconem (YA urban fantasy), 57k words
    WIP: What The Rain Brought In (horror), 10,000 words
    WIP: Devil's Bridge (space opera), 20k

    Blog: http://glitter-n-gore.dreamwidth.com/

  2. #52
    Write. Write. Writey Write Write. mrsmig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,740
    Talk of Jurassic Park makes me remember babysitting my nephew Jimmy, who was home sick but still wanted to watch the movie. He'd just gotten it on DVD and had seen it once. I put it on and Jimmy sat on the floor, cuddled in a blanket. He watched happily, talking to himself a bit about the various scenes and characters (he was just a little guy - maybe about seven or eight).

    However, during the scene where bad guy Nedry flees through the park in the pouring rain, Jimmy turned to me and said "I'm going to go under my blanket now. You can tell me to come out when the guy washes his face." I'd seen the movie but was like huh?. There wasn't time to ask for clarification since Jimmy was already under his blanket. When Nedry's Jeep got stuck and the spitting dino showed up, a little voice rose from under the blanket, tremulously but determinedly singing "It's A Small World." All through the scene - while Nedry shrieked as the dinos tore him apart - Jimmy kept singing.

    The very next scene opened with Dr. Grant splashing his face with water from a culvert. "The guy's washing his face," I told Jimmy, and he came out from under the blanket and continued watching the movie. The later, even more intense stuff didn't bother him at all.

    To this day, I'm amazed that after one viewing, Jimmy had registered that Grant at the culvert was the "all clear" sign that the Nedry scene was over. And whenever I see that scene on TV, my brain provides its own soundtrack of a little boy singing it's a small world after all, it's a small world after all, it's a small, small world...
    Last edited by mrsmig; 10-23-2016 at 06:48 PM.
    KINGLET: Coming in August 2017 from Fiery Seas Publishing
    FISKUR: Releasing November 2017 from Fiery Seas



    My Website:
    www.donnamigliaccio.com

    And the occasional Tweet.





  3. #53
    practical experience, FTW Simpson17866's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    409
    I would have to say the revelation of the twist in M Night Shaymalan's The Visit.

    I'd spent the entire movie wondering when we were going to find out that the grandparents had been possessed, what the demons wanted to do, how the empty well in the forest was going to play into banishing them and saving the day...

    "Those aren't your grandparents. Who are those people? Oh my God, is that who you've spent the whole week with?"

    Snapping back to reality with the twist "This is not a supernatural story" was a thousand times scarier than the original Halloween doing the opposite.

  4. #54
    Shocking scenes don't stick with me over time; scary 'visuals' ebb away from me fairly quickly (I put it down to the brains' natural tendency to push away negative stimuli). Therefore my favorite horror is moody, subdued, atmospheric horror. The story itself; the buildup; rather than any specific scene. Favorite horror movie is "Let's Scare Jessica to Death" (1972); 1965's "The Haunting" (dir Robert Wise); and other more subtle films of this ilk. I favor unreliable narrators, characters with blind-spots, and ambiguous menace.

    Plus I think something else too: all visuals are losing their power these days as we as a society shuffle around enslaved to daily diets of media. Media saturation effaces the impact which 'lone' imagery used to be able to haunt us with. For example: remember the spooky TV-set in 'Poltergeist'? That story takes place before the onset of 24 hr cable programming and 24 hr news feeds from CNN. But these days, if you are a TV junkie and spend your life watching TV, the prospect of a 'menacing' TV set is just not likely to terrify you.

    Meanwhile, think how different an experience it is if you visit a medical oddities museum and stand before a dead fetus in a jar of formaldehyde. That's something you just don't encounter, up-close-and-personal, very often in your life. Or how about if you've ever walked along the shore of a lake and seen a rotting rowboat or a drowned animal lying at your feet.

    Yup. For me, (speaking just for myself only) nothing I see on a screen or computer monitor these days has any 'power' anymore. My mind regards it all as boring and staid.

  5. #55
    Ideas bounce around in my head Jason's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    4,631
    Wow - no references to The Shining yet? I first saw that around the age of 7 or 8. About the time the kids finger started saying "red rum" and the scenes of rooms with waves of blood colliding and cascading everywhere is when my mom said, "Jason, I think you should go to bed."

    First time ever I complied without a moments' hesitation. I cowered under my covers for a good hour or two before falling asleep. I've watched the entire movie since then and not been as affected, but that was my first scary experience ever. Not a fan of horror now, and suspect that had a lot to do with my distaste for the genre as a whole.

  6. #56
    practical experience, FTW
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    396
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhoda Nightingale View Post
    When I was a kid, the movie that scared me the most was Who Framed Roger Rabbit? I had nightmares about steamrollers for years. YEARS.

    More recently, there's The Ring. I still can't be alone in a room with a staticky television. It still gets to me. Also, the lawnmower scene in Sinister. Egads. Even the soundtrack is horrifying.
    I actually watched the Ring last night. I have it on dvd.

  7. #57
    practical experience, FTW Simpson17866's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    409
    Quote Originally Posted by Frankie007 View Post
    I actually watched the Ring last night. I have it on dvd.
    Not on video

  8. #58
    Banned for Trolling tommyb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    comfortably between a rock and a hard place
    Posts
    23
    There is a movie I know as Djinn, but has different names in different countries, is French production I believe.
    There is a scene where the djinn is inside, in shadow, and stretches out, and it is creepy as f.

  9. #59
    practical experience, FTW anakhouri79's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    154
    I just watched a movie called Under the Shadow, set during the Iran/Iraq War, where a woman's daughter becomes possessed by a djinni. Is that the same one? It was good.

    The part in Alien where the guy (maybe the captain? I don't remember) is in the ducts, and the other crew members can see the alien on their scanner as it approaches him, but he can't see anything because it's pitch black, then he turns around and IT'S RIGHT THERE gets me every time. I even know it's coming and it still makes me nervous as hell and I jump every time.
    Last edited by anakhouri79; 01-12-2017 at 12:24 AM.

  10. #60
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin deafblindmute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    38
    I don't get scared by a lot of movies. When I was a kid, Phantasm freaked me out a ton, especially the scene where the kid wakes up to find The Tall Man over his bed, looking down at him. That messed me up.

    As much as I love horror movies, though...how many scared me? A lot of gory films like Hellraiser and Event Horizon I think are more awesome and cool than scary, and films like The Exorcist suck me into the story more than scare me. I'd say Nightmare on Elm Street freaked me out when I saw it at twelve. Not Krueger so much as the whole environment of the film feeling trippy and surreal. Especially when Tina comes in that body bag...that messed with me.

    Ju-On has many scenes that are creepy, but the bed scene messed me up (I'm noticing a thing with beds and sleep...)

    But I think the most genuinely scary thing I've seen, and it took me awhile to think of it, would be the chase scene in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. The whole third act of that movie feels like something out of a nightmare. Like, it's so relentless and so impossible to escape, and, even when it's over, the main character is broken beyond repair. It's just nightmarish. And so much of it is nonverbal. There's little explanation, little dialogue, it's just...nonstop.

  11. #61
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin carroll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    3
    I really love the scene from The Conjuring (2013) when mother plays hide-and-seek with children, and then she hears claps in the opposite side of where her daughter is hiding. And then there are two clapping hands that are sticking out of a wardrobe.

  12. #62
    banned as an incurable tosspot
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    518
    Quote Originally Posted by carroll View Post
    I really love the scene from The Conjuring (2013) when mother plays hide-and-seek with children, and then she hears claps in the opposite side of where her daughter is hiding. And then there are two clapping hands that are sticking out of a wardrobe.
    Yes!

  13. #63
    banned as an incurable tosspot
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    518
    Quote Originally Posted by CBJason View Post
    Wow - no references to The Shining yet? I first saw that around the age of 7 or 8. About the time the kids finger started saying "red rum" and the scenes of rooms with waves of blood colliding and cascading everywhere is when my mom said, "Jason, I think you should go to bed."

    First time ever I complied without a moments' hesitation. I cowered under my covers for a good hour or two before falling asleep. I've watched the entire movie since then and not been as affected, but that was my first scary experience ever. Not a fan of horror now, and suspect that had a lot to do with my distaste for the genre as a whole.
    The Shining was hilarious to me...even as a kid. I still laugh at most of the scenes and Jack's face

  14. #64
    Ideas bounce around in my head Jason's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    4,631
    Heh, like I said, as an adult less visceral than as a kid, but still get shivers from the "redrum" scene - and of course Jack Nicholson's line - "Here's Johnny!"

    I later learned that line was actually one of the most famous ad lib lines in the history of cinema! Didn't know that wasn't​ part of the original script!
    2017 Goals
    Read 50 of these books
    Come up with a good book idea and actually write it!

  15. #65
    Even the sphinx has eyes O_O Spooky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Dead Hand Bunker
    Posts
    89
    The infamous one second pale captain howdy baleful snarlface befouling the cryptic darkness in the exorcist where regan is first introduced to her charming little ouija board buddy, truly unnerving stuff!

  16. #66
    Just getting started. Michael Sellars's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Liverpool
    Posts
    3
    Although he isn't considered a horror director by most, David Lynch has created some of the most terrifying scenes in cinema and on television.

    The end of Mulholland Drive when the tiny old couple emerge from under the door and chase Betty/Diane; not to mention the thing behind the diner. The "as a matter of fact, I'm there right now" scene in Lost Highway. Most of Inland Empire. And, of course, Twin Peaks, season three, episode eight. "Got a light?"
    Author of Hyenas, an apocalyptic horror novel set in Liverpool. Described by Kirkus Reviews as "genuinely frightening... exhilarating... a stirring addition to the zombie canon."

    Read the full review here.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Custom Search