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Thread: Books you thought you would like but didn't?

  1. #101
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    Atonement - Ian McEwan
    Pretty much anything by David Nicholls

  2. #102
    tiny hedgehog JetFueledCar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaymz Connelly View Post
    Hmm, I looked up about both Skulduggery Pleasant and Alcatraz... I might give the first book in each of those series' a go. If I don't care for them, I'd be willing to bet #2 son will enjoy them. Thanks for the recs! (lately my choice in books has really sucked)

    Truthwitch sounds rather like it would be a waste of time and money. I always thought one of the basic rules of writing was 'don't give your characters similar sounding names'.
    BTW, I recommend stopping at #3 of Skulduggery Pleasant. Around book four I felt like the following things all happened at once:

    - Jumped the Shark.
    - Serious case of Cerberus Syndrome.
    - Books got longer and longer as the pace got slower and slower.
    - The author developed Golden Word Syndrome.

    All of which combined meant the ultimate sin: This "screwball fantasy" wasn't funny anymore. I made it through book five and stopped. Still sad about it, because I wanted to see the end--but then a bunch of my favorites (SPOILERS) died or became evil in a way that meant they were going to die in the end. In the same book. So I stopped caring.

    Also, to add to this list--DREADNOUGHT by April Daniels. It's actually quite a good book, and I'm so pleased to see a transfemale superhero in a book that I can snag off my library shelf. I didn't not like it because it was a bad book--I didn't like it because it was too good at demonstrating the effects of emotional abuse, too good at showing the reaction many parents have when their child comes out, too good at dealing with the real things that impact a transwoman coming out. Lately I'm reading purely for escapism, and this book wasn't good for that. So it's a very good book and I recommend it, but I won't be reading book two. At least not yet.
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  3. #103
    practical experience, FTW Jan74's Avatar
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    The Land of Painted Caves - Jean Auel, I loved the original three novels, but the last three were hard to read and by the time the fifth and final came out it was a horrible read.
    Fifty Shades of Grey-E.L James, this book was hyped up and when I finally read it I couldn't finish it.
    Willow brook road- Sherryl Woods, it is the only book of hers I've attempted to read and if her other novels are similar in nature I'm shocked she's considered a best selling novelist. When she was describing one of the characters it was so cliche and corny, I didn't make it past the first chapter. I'm shocked this is a series on tv.

    "You fail only if you stop writing" ~Ray Bradbury~
    "The road to hell is paved with adverbs" ~Stephen King~
    WIP Romance or Women's fiction, hopefully by the end I'll know.
    "If I waited for perfection, I would never write a word." ~Margaret Atwood~
    "There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you." ~Mary Angelou~


  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by JetFueledCar View Post
    No thank you. I'll go read Tamora Pierce for the bazillionth time.
    It's funny you should mention her, I was just about to post complaining about Tamora Pierce. After years of everyone and their niece recommending her to me, I finally started the Protector of the Small quartet, finished the first book (First Test) and thought it was really bad. I wanted to get sucked into her world so badly, but the writing was awful, the setting was lazy, half the characters could have been cut, and the plot was almost nonexistent. And yet I seem to be the only person on the internet who feels this way. People even call her a master of worldbuilding and character development, which is making me wonder if someone snuck another book behind this cover.

    Will I find the same flaws if I keep reading? I was so excited to finally experience Tortall, and I'm just reeling from how bad this first installment was. Not to mention the friend that lent it to me told me to start with Kel's series because the writing has improved from Alanna. What is going on?
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  5. #105
    practical experience, FTW Cobalt Jade's Avatar
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    Isaac Bashevis Singer's The King of the Fields. I like his short fiction, and I wanted to like the novel because it had all the things that interested me... a Dark Ages tribe living in Southeastern Poland, societal changes that come to them, a simple tone, a meandering that plot that isn't so meandering after all, humor and irony. But after a while I grew tired of the misogyny. And the end was a cheat! Won't reveal all of it, but it was along the lines of "Life's a bitch, and then you die." Oh Isaac, Isaac, you could have done better!

  6. #106
    Come on you stranger, you legend, Devil Ledbetter's Avatar
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    Right now, READY PLAYER ONE. Highly recommended by several friends. What a pile of unimaginative tripe.

    Why does everyone love this so much? I'm continuing reading only because I'm perverse like that.

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  7. #107
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    The Night Circus.

    I so wanted to love this book. It was the only one I took on a long haul flight. Fifty pages later, I'm just...bored. Months later, I still haven't picked it up again. Maybe it'd make a better movie. I'm sure the special effects with all that magic would be stunning. But the story and characters were meh.

    I actually started reading Atonement pretty recently. It's so well written but really really (really!) slow.......
    Last edited by Atlantic12; 11-15-2017 at 09:09 PM.

  8. #108
    Come on you stranger, you legend, Devil Ledbetter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atlantic12 View Post

    I actually started reading Atonement pretty recently. It's so well written but really really (really!) slow.......
    So slow. McEwan's schtick is he sets a great hook, and then drags you through 27 pages of pointless, dull descriptions of daisies nodding in the breeze and the filigreed lacework of grease in a pan of roast potatoes before he finally writes anything plot worthy. It's one of those books where the movie is actually better because the movie doesn't have time to navel gaze ad nauseum about pretty scenery. (And I say that as someone who can't even stand Keira Knightly).

    Pearl Jam is Ellie's religion.
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  9. #109
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    Ha, yeah Keira is on the cover of my copy because it was one of those reprints after the film came out (bought cheaply in Dublin).

    I think it took like 10 pages for a character to enter her house. I need help with slowing down pace a bit in my writing, but that was just ridiculous.

  10. #110
    practical experience, FTW Jan74's Avatar
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    Well, I couldn't wait to get my grubby little hands on Alice Hoffman's new novel, The rules of magic, and sadly I could not get into it. So back to the library it went.

    "You fail only if you stop writing" ~Ray Bradbury~
    "The road to hell is paved with adverbs" ~Stephen King~
    WIP Romance or Women's fiction, hopefully by the end I'll know.
    "If I waited for perfection, I would never write a word." ~Margaret Atwood~
    "There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you." ~Mary Angelou~


  11. #111
    practical experience, FTW SciSarahTops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brightdreamer View Post

    Magician: Apprentice, by Raymond E. Feist - Another "classic" epic fantasy. Nice ideas, but the execution didn't do it for me.
    .
    I didn't finish this, found it very generic

    Quote Originally Posted by cmi0616 View Post
    I'd heard great things about Love in the Time of Cholera but I still hold that that book is pretty turdish.
    I couldn't enjoy LITTOC either, the racism, sexisim and lack of anyone likeable did it for me. I did at least finish.

    I just finished 'The Stars are Legion' by Kameron Hurley and I thought I was going to love it. It was all female Warlords back stabbling each other on planets that are living oraganisms and all the tech is biological and disgustingly oozy. But the main character had insomnia and I hate that as a plot device. A drip feed on information that might or might not be reliable. It turned out to be a quest story and not particularly exciting for me, lots of hemming and hawwing. A kind of boring journey of self discovery. I finished it, and I'm glad I did but I was dissapointed. Others have LOVED it. I listened to some podcasts to try and understand if I was wrong about this book. Turns out I must be.
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  12. #112
    Beastly Fido Roxxsmom's Avatar
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    The Riddlemaster of Hed by Patricia McKillip. Most of the other fantasy fans I know rave about that book, but it had somehow flown under my radar (in spite of most of my favorite SFF writers being women). So I picked it up and gave it a try, and I couldn't get past the first chapter. It was completely "WTF" for me. I didn't get the pov, the voice, the setting, or the motives of the characters (or even who the protagonist was). I guess the title says it all--it's supposed to be puzzling and elusive, but I guess I'm not "bright" enough as a reader to sort it out. I've been told you have to "submit" to the narrative style and then it's the best book ever, but I guess I'm not a literary submissive :P
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  13. #113
    The new me oneblindmouse's Avatar
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    Reunion of Ghosts by Judith Claire Mitchell. The blurb got me hooked, and said the book was humourous. I found it one of the most depressing reads ever! And the first part was boring, a confusing backstory about the three main characters' grandfather, great grandfather, and great great grandfather.

    Meh!

    "Strange Destinies" by Guillermo Rubio Arias-Paz, translated from the Spanish and out now on Amazon and the Endless Bookcase.

    Goodreads

  14. #114
    practical experience, FTW Raindrop's Avatar
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    Iain Banks' Feersum Endjinn. I couldn't get past the phonetic spelling (one of the POVs is written that way). Doubly annoyed because the character in question seemed to be awesome, from what I could read. But I had to read it out loud, very slowly, and that was too much.

    I breezed through Clockwork Orange, so I thought I could adapt... but it's not quite the same.
    If I could put all my typos together, I'd have enough material for a trilogy.

  15. #115
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin FrauleinCiano's Avatar
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    The Jazz Palace by Mary Morris. It had the two elements that always draw me in immediately: Chicago and the Jazz Age.

    I love the history of that city. Adore it. But I don't want the narrator yammering on about the 1893 World's Fair when it has absolutely zero to do with what is going on currently.

    Further, I don't want to hear about the first "manhood" a mother ever felt immediately after she just lost over half her children in one maritime disaster. And I don't want to know about how the corpse of a victim in said disaster stirred something in a teenage boy pulling her from the wreckage. No thank you.

    I only made it 4 chapters before giving up.

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