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Thread: What horror novel/short story are you reading?

  1. #51
    Searching for dragons Blinkk's Avatar
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    I just picked up the Green Mile by Stephen King two days ago. I'm about to finish it. I told my bf I've never seen the movie and he's trying to remedy that. I told him I have to finish the book before I see the movie.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blinkk View Post
    I just picked up the Green Mile by Stephen King two days ago. I'm about to finish it. I told my bf I've never seen the movie and he's trying to remedy that. I told him I have to finish the book before I see the movie.
    The book's good; the movie's better. Shawshank Redemption and the Green Mile or the only two Stephen King stories (IMO) that are better as movies.

  3. #53
    Cultivate the heart quality. - Ali AW Moderator Jcomp's Avatar
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    I've been reading an anthology of 100 horror stories that I bought years ago, but had barely read. Finished Barry Pain's story "The Four-Fingered Hand" a week ago and it's been on my mind since. An older "ghost" story that swerves around any expectation by simply linking the supernatural to the unknowable.

  4. #54
    New edition of my first book! AW Moderator Calla Lily's Avatar
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    Terry Brooks' Running with the Demon. I tried the audiobook many years ago and hated the narrator. Decided to give the actual book a try.

  5. #55
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    I've just started rereading The Dead Zone. It wasn't one of my favorite books, but I love how King handles the beginning. He makes it look easy.

  6. #56
    practical experience, FTW HarvesterOfSorrow's Avatar
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    The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson.
    "He's gone! He's gone from here! The evil is gone!"

    Sam Loomis
    John Carpenter's Halloween.

  7. #57
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    I just finished reading Mimic, by Donald Wollheim, a short story the movie of the same name was based on. It had little plot and if submitted to SYW on here, it would be savaged (rightfully, IMO).

    But if you've seen the movie, what was interesting to me was how little there was for the movie to be based on. I found a free copy online, so you may want to take a look (only about 5 or 6 pages).

  8. #58
    all out of fucks to give quicklime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calla Lily View Post
    Daphne duMaurier's "The Birds" Beautifully atmospheric. Quite different from the movie.

    Never read, but short aside: Bag of Bones was the book that got me thinking of writing. It was based heavily on Rebecca. I read BoB then Rebecca, both are in my very short list of absolute favorites, along with The October Country, Thinner, and The Cormorant. I'm not reading any of those at the time, but fwiw, find the Cormorant. Find it used, find it new, however; I don't give a flying fuck: Find it. Some if it is odd, some doesn't click, but what does is just flat-out creepy. Oppressively creepy. And I hated the fucking book, and loved it even more. Read it.
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  9. #59
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin Emily Deibler's Avatar
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    I'm halfway through Joe Hill's short story collection 20th Century Ghosts.

  10. #60
    practical experience, FTW Alma Matters's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emily Deibler View Post
    I'm halfway through Joe Hill's short story collection 20th Century Ghosts.
    I read this collection last year, I really enjoyed it.

    I'm just about to pick up Tim Lebbon's 'White' - I have heard good things and it'll be my first book of his. Have you guys read much of him?

  11. #61
    New edition of my first book! AW Moderator Calla Lily's Avatar
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    Rereading all 10 volumes of the Hellsing manga. Talk about pulling out all the stops! So much fun.

  12. #62
    Picker, grinner, lover, sinner. D.A Watson's Avatar
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    Stinger by Robert McCammon. Wonder if he ever had a word with Stephen King when he read Under the Dome...
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  13. #63
    Hello, I must be going jlmott's Avatar
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    Just finished listening to Dan Simmons Carrion Comfort. I had previously read Summer of Night and The Terror. Of those three, I think The Terror is the best, but what I really appreciate in reading him is that he writes complicated action sequences better than anyone I can think of--for example, the New Years Eve Masque sequence in The Terror, among many others.

  14. #64
    Picker, grinner, lover, sinner. D.A Watson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlmott View Post
    Just finished listening to Dan Simmons Carrion Comfort. I had previously read Summer of Night and The Terror. Of those three, I think The Terror is the best, but what I really appreciate in reading him is that he writes complicated action sequences better than anyone I can think of--for example, the New Years Eve Masque sequence in The Terror, among many others.
    Was thinking about the book the other night. Was a documentary on TV about how they recently discovered the wreck of the Erebus. The Terror is one of my all time favourite books, and that New Years Eve scene in particular is just spectacular. You should check out The Abominable as well, dude. Another belter from Mr Simmons.
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  15. #65
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin Kevvy711's Avatar
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    I just started the regulators by Richard Bachman, anyone ever read this book.

  16. #66
    Evil, undead Chihuahua SuperModerator Haggis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevvy711 View Post
    I just started the regulators by Richard Bachman, anyone ever read this book.
    Too long ago to remember, but Bachman always came across to me as King lite. Readable and good stories, but not great.
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  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevvy711 View Post
    I just started the regulators by Richard Bachman, anyone ever read this book.
    It's been a long time, but from what I remember, it's a decent book. I'll second what Haggis said about Bachman. But then again none of the Bachman stories babbled on for 1300 pages, either, lol. IMO, the two best Bachman books are Blaze and Thinner.

  18. #68
    Evil, undead Chihuahua SuperModerator Haggis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinman View Post
    It's been a long time, but from what I remember, it's a decent book. I'll second what Haggis said about Bachman. But then again none of the Bachman stories babbled on for 1300 pages, either, lol. IMO, the two best Bachman books are Blaze and Thinner.
    Heh. Good point, Tinman. Thinner was perhaps my favorite of the bunch.
    Quote Originally Posted by Curlz View Post
    For those of you that don't know what "haggis" is, I can only say that it's much better not knowing anyway
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  19. #69
    I have plans... C.bronco's Avatar
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    Bachman was King. It was his foray into writing under a psuedonym. I remember reading Thinner, and thinking, "This sounds just like Stephen King!"

    You know who else is like King? If you ever get a chance to read PeeDee's stuff, peter Damien, it is remarkably alike in voice.
    Last edited by C.bronco; 08-16-2015 at 08:31 AM.



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  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by D.A Watson View Post
    Stinger by Robert McCammon. Wonder if he ever had a word with Stephen King when he read Under the Dome...
    Clifford Simak should have had a talk with them both, and the Simpsons, about his novel All Flesh is Grass (1965) BTW I like McCammon a great deal. I think from about 1981 to 1992 he really was "the second Stephen King" except that his social melodrama bits had less cruel "realism", and more pathos. And then he broke down and returned to writing only a decade later, and now is a master of fabulous 18th century detective adventure. Sensitive chaps, talented writers. Can be unpredictable. I'm currently reading Koontz's From the Corner of His Eye, and Steve Yeager's first Raptor Apocalypse volume. The Koontz has an unexpected streak of consistent black humor among the usual ingredients of badass suspense, preaching, and deaf ear. Also less description overload than I'm used to with Koontz. Fine book thus far, I'm 3/4 done. Yeager's Raptor Apocalypse is way better than most of today's new crop. It's like actually tries to fill the shoes of the 100 year old masters like King, Koontz, McCammon and Charles Grant. Although some reviewers compare him to Lee Child, for some reason... I also made a quick detour and read King's Ur. Eh, not bad. Like The Breathing Method: a fine short story idea (a golden age of sci-fi idea in this case, reminiscent of early Heinlein) swathed inside the needless layers of a protracted novelette.

  21. #71
    Been Here A While Feidb's Avatar
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    I became a big fan of Hunter Shea after reading his Montauk Monster. I'm now reading Tortures of the Damned and am about 3/4 of the way through. It's pretty decent old school icky bug in an apocalyptic vein. Great stuff! The ending will tell if it carries through.

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  22. #72
    Author of FORTNEY ROAD Jeff C. Stevenson's Avatar
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    I just finished a lot of back to back reading of books by the late Alan Ryan:

    DEAD WHITE (which I realized I had read years ago; doesn't really work for me but if you like King's STORM OF THE CENTURY, it has that feel to it)

    CAST A COLD EYE (a keeper even though it's more mood than resolution)

    THE BONES WIZARD (short stories; loved most of them; very Thomas Tessier)
    THE BACK OF BEYOND (great novellas that really don't pay off but sure keep you turning the pages!)
    FORTNEY ROAD:
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    What really happened at Fortney Road?
    http://www.amazon.com/Fortney-Road-Death-Deception-Christian/dp/0988493829

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  23. #73
    tiny hedgehog JetFueledCar's Avatar
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    I'm reading an anthology of Lovecraft-inspired stories, Shadows Over Innsmouth, plus a collection of actual Lovecraft stories, The Watchers Out Of Time. I've got another four Lovecraft anthologies beside me and am hopping around in what I read next (I want to read more Arkham, I have three anthologies on Innsmouth). Just read At The Mountains Of Madness yesterday (then again as a graphic novel today) and I confess it's the only one that really scared me so far.

    In other words, I'm deep in the Lovecraftian subgenre with no intentions of getting out.
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  24. #74
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    Not reading it right now, but one of the creepiest novels I've ever read is the classic House on the Borderland by W. H. Hodgson. It has a Blair Witch quality to it that worked very well for me.

    Hodgson was a strange writer who did some interesting weird work, and a couple of things that verge on the unreadable. He was one of England's many unfortunate literary losses at a relatively early age in WWI. His work influenced Lovecraft, in particular.

    caw
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  25. #75
    Author of FORTNEY ROAD Jeff C. Stevenson's Avatar
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    FORTNEY ROAD:
    The True Story of Life, Death, and Deception
    in a Christian Cult




    “A unique and compelling true story. —Dean Koontz
    “Fascinating and disturbing” —Jonathan Kellerman
    “Strongly recommended. Exceptionally well written.
    —Midwest Book Review

    What really happened at Fortney Road?
    http://www.amazon.com/Fortney-Road-Death-Deception-Christian/dp/0988493829

    Member Horror Writers Association


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