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Thread: Regal House Publishing

  1. #26
    Mushroom Polenth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jennybhatt View Post
    4/ I checked the Linkedin profiles of both Jaynie Royal, Editor-in-Chief, and Ruth Feiertag, Senior Editor. While they do have other staff members, the top two set the tone, spirit, style. Jaynie Royal is not 19-years-old as someone has written here. She graduated with her Bachelor's around the same time as I did. And I'm in my mid-40s. So, unless she was able to time-travel, that's not possible. Ruth Feiertag has rather impressive editing credentials in her profile. A further google search turns up even more. As for the rest of the staff, they are not full-time -- as would be the case at any small press still working to break even -- but they do have literary credentials and I browsed through the social media profiles of some of them too.
    No one said that Jaynie Royal was 19. It was stated that Jaynie Cox was 19 according to her Facebook profile. Which is still the case: she was born in 1996 according to Facebook (so now around 21, as it's two years after someone said she was 19). The profile doesn't mention being an editor at the press, though does say she's an editor, and I'd note Jaynie Cox is the name used for a Twitter account with Fitzroy Books as the account name. I'd also highlight the two years ago thing, because things change over the years. It doesn't mean what people said at the time was wrong, only that sometimes things change (such as who works for a press and what books they have out). Checking post dates is important.

    Here is what the original post said for reference:

    Quote Originally Posted by MaggieC70 View Post
    ETA: Jaynie Cox, who is/was supposed to be some sort of editor for Regal House, is exactly 19 years old. She intimates on her Facebook page that she is somehow involved in "publishing," and has thousands of friends who apparently think she is indeed "in publishing."
    Note the surname given is Cox, not Royal. This means Jaynie Royal is a new name in the mix and nothing was stated about her. Does this mean you're confirming that they're both the same person? If so, realise that it wasn't that people here made things up or didn't look at the information. It's that the information given said she was that age. And that information is still there to be found.
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  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polenth View Post
    No one said that Jaynie Royal was 19. It was stated that Jaynie Cox was 19 according to her Facebook profile. Which is still the case: she was born in 1996 according to Facebook (so now around 21, as it's two years after someone said she was 19). The profile doesn't mention being an editor at the press, though does say she's an editor, and I'd note Jaynie Cox is the name used for a Twitter account with Fitzroy Books as the account name. I'd also highlight the two years ago thing, because things change over the years. It doesn't mean what people said at the time was wrong, only that sometimes things change (such as who works for a press and what books they have out). Checking post dates is important.

    Here is what the original post said for reference:



    Note the surname given is Cox, not Royal. This means Jaynie Royal is a new name in the mix and nothing was stated about her. Does this mean you're confirming that they're both the same person? If so, realise that it wasn't that people here made things up or didn't look at the information. It's that the information given said she was that age. And that information is still there to be found.
    I am in no position to confirm if Jaynie Cox and Jaynie Royal are the same person. I have not asked her that. What I do know is that the EIC and founder of Regal House is closer to my age than she is to her 20s. I did see that the original post referring to her age was from two years ago and I do check all post dates/times. I should have said "21" in my comment to be exact like you have pointed out — so, my apologies for that. In my response, I used the name "Jaynie Royal" specifically because that's the name on the website, the Linkedin profile, and the name of the person I have been corresponding with.
    Last edited by jennybhatt; 10-14-2017 at 09:04 AM.

  3. #28
    Mushroom Polenth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jennybhatt View Post
    I am in no position to confirm if Jaynie Cox and Jaynie Royal are the same person. I have not asked her that. What I do know is that the EIC and founder of Regal House is closer to my age than she is to her 20s. I did see that the original post referring to her age was from two years ago and I do check all post dates/times. I should have said "21" in my comment to be exact like you have pointed out so, my apologies for that. In my response, I used the name "Jaynie Royal" specifically because that's the name on the website, the Linkedin profile, and the name of the person I have been corresponding with.
    My point was that your criticism of the statement was not based on what the statement actually said. You could only know the profile age was wrong if you knew they were the same person. But even if you did know that the profile was wrong, it doesn't make it incorrect to say the profile contained that information. Now, it's a smaller detail, for sure. But it shows a frame of mind I see in your posts, where you want this to work out, so you're trying to argue against everything. Even the things you know are right because you've seen the information. It's not a good frame of mind when it comes to analysing whether a press is going to be good for you.

    I'm multiply marginalised and I'm all for diversity and such, but the majority of small presses I've seen with that as a goal have ended up failing. Along with a number that didn't have it as a goal, but did end up with marginalised authors. The majority of authors I've seen stuck in these messes ended up self-publishing once they got out (and it's notable that often they were happy at first, because it takes time for things to fall apart and for problems to become public). So the small press did them no favours at all and did nothing much for diversity in the end. To be a good idea, a publisher needs more than nice ideals and needs to offer something that self-publishing doesn't. They need to look like their plan is going to work, not that it might work if they learn fast enough.
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  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polenth View Post
    My point was that your criticism of the statement was not based on what the statement actually said. You could only know the profile age was wrong if you knew they were the same person. But even if you did know that the profile was wrong, it doesn't make it incorrect to say the profile contained that information. Now, it's a smaller detail, for sure. But it shows a frame of mind I see in your posts, where you want this to work out, so you're trying to argue against everything. Even the things you know are right because you've seen the information. It's not a good frame of mind when it comes to analysing whether a press is going to be good for you.

    I'm multiply marginalised and I'm all for diversity and such, but the majority of small presses I've seen with that as a goal have ended up failing. Along with a number that didn't have it as a goal, but did end up with marginalised authors. The majority of authors I've seen stuck in these messes ended up self-publishing once they got out (and it's notable that often they were happy at first, because it takes time for things to fall apart and for problems to become public). So the small press did them no favours at all and did nothing much for diversity in the end. To be a good idea, a publisher needs more than nice ideals and needs to offer something that self-publishing doesn't. They need to look like their plan is going to work, not that it might work if they learn fast enough.
    See, we can split hairs over one statement re. age here but we then take away from the overall picture. The original post said Jaynie Cox was shown as editor and is 19. I spoke about Jaynie Royal, whom I have come to know as the editor-in-chief through my interactions, and how she is not anywhere near that age. I should have said 21, not 19. I got that and apologized for it. That said, if we're going to get surgical about it, I wasn't disputing the editor's name issue but the statement re. the editor's age. The name issue is still a bit of a mystery to me but I have left it to personal choice and moved on. I suggest you and I also move on from the name/age point because there really is nothing more to be said here that can further the discussion in a productive manner.

    Re. frame of mind: Every single commenter/poster on this entire forum (on forums everywhere) has a certain frame of mind, including yourself. I have not argued for or against anyone's personal bias — no human being exists without such cognitive bias. I am simply trying to counter with objective information I have gleaned to balance the scales a bit here. Your read of my "intent" behind what I have shared is, with all due respect, besides the point. Let's stick to the facts about the press rather than any personal intent of mine. Everyone here is smart enough to take objective facts for what they are and decide for themselves. My "intent" should not play into their decisions of what they choose to do. Just as the "intent" of the previous commenters did not play into my decision to submit to the press in the first place. I did not trust the credibility of the original posts because of sketchy information as I mentioned earlier.

    Re. your last point: "To be a good idea, a publisher needs more than nice ideals and needs to offer something that self-publishing doesn't. They need to look like their plan is going to work, not that it might work if they learn fast enough."

    I couldn't agree more. Which is why I did reach out directly to the press and ask them a whole bunch of questions and received a 3-4 page document filled with specific answers re. their plans. That information prompted me to register onto this forum and share what I can (apart from the confidential stuff.) If you have specific information/facts about their plans and how such plans will not work or do not offer anything more than self-publishing, etc., that will definitely be a more worthwhile discussion for all here.

    I have not made any decision about whether I want to work with any small press, never mind this one. I am still collecting information to understand the pros and cons, talking with other writer friends about their experiences, etc. When I do make my decision, it will be based on facts/information I have gotten first-hand from the press itself and the contractual details. It will not be based on something I have read on this forum or any other forum. I simply felt the need, as I have now said in this and earlier posts, to balance the rhetoric out there with some objective evidence.

    Peace, my friend. We are both on the same side of truth, justice, diversity, and good work in publishing. Getting upset at each other for what we perceive as "intent" does those causes no good. Let's discuss the merits of the facts/evidence and move on from there. That will be of larger benefit to others here as well. All the best.
    Last edited by jennybhatt; 10-14-2017 at 10:55 AM.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polenth View Post
    Note the surname given is Cox, not Royal. This means Jaynie Royal is a new name in the mix and nothing was stated about her.
    If you look at the links I posted, they all have photos, and they are photos of the same person. (In the case of Jaynie Cox, her FB photo is the same one that Jaynie Royal uses.) Her Linkedin page shows that she's in her early forties. The FB page doesn't include that information, but there might be other people with the same or similar name on FB.

    The pen name doesn't bother me--I'll be using one myself for my next series. But the two different names for her editorial/publishing work seemed odd, and the mix of all three gave me pause. I tend to be cautious, especially with micro-presses.

    I will say that given PJ Royal is Jaynie Royal's pen name, I'd hope she wasn't the person editing Regal's books. Her own book is riddled with errors, as are her blog posts, and I winced when I saw that both she and her husband attacked someone on Amazon for their negative review. Not cool.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by eqb View Post
    If you look at the links I posted, they all have photos, and they are photos of the same person. (In the case of Jaynie Cox, her FB photo is the same one that Jaynie Royal uses.) Her Linkedin page shows that she's in her early forties. The FB page doesn't include that information, but there might be other people with the same or similar name on FB.

    The pen name doesn't bother me--I'll be using one myself for my next series. But the two different names for her editorial/publishing work seemed odd, and the mix of all three gave me pause. I tend to be cautious, especially with micro-presses.

    I will say that given PJ Royal is Jaynie Royal's pen name, I'd hope she wasn't the person editing Regal's books. Her own book is riddled with errors, as are her blog posts, and I winced when I saw that both she and her husband attacked someone on Amazon for their negative review. Not cool.
    I'm still confused with the Cox vs Royal name thing. Not so much the PJ vs Jaynie thing. But, again, I believe it is a personal choice and I don't intend to question it or let it be a big factor in my assessment.

    I also take that long negative review on Amazon with a grain of salt. Historical scholars and historical fiction writers have always quibbled about such matters. Even Hilary Mantel, with her Wolf Hall books, which have both won Bookers (and can I add how much I enjoyed reading them and am desperate to read the last in the trilogy even though I know what happens next), is not spared. Mantel had to write long essays in The Guardian, The Telegraph, and London Review of Books to defend herself and her approach to historical fiction while skewering her critics with skillful rhetoric they could not hope to match. My point is that not all authors have access to such platforms to deal with their critics and must do what they think best. I did not see the husband's comment so perhaps it has been removed. And PJ Royal's response to the Amazon critic — the one I've read — is an edited one, I see. This one reads, to me, courteous and assertive. I fully appreciate we all bring our own interpretations to what we read.

    All that said, I want to thank all of you who have engaged with me in this wonderful dialogue — my first ever on this forum and my first ever re. this overall topic. It has been, truly, interesting. I must move on from this discussion, so I will be unregistering, etc. I did use my real identity so no one thinks I'm here masquerading as someone else for some nefarious reason. My social media and online identity is entirely transparent as well.

    Thanks, all. And all the best to all of you as you continue on your own writing/publishing journeys.

  7. #32
    Mildly Disturbing Filigree's Avatar
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    And there is the flounce.

    I wish Jennybhatt well, and hope the publishing industry treats them kindly. But I do agree with many of the other posters: publishing isn't an entry level job, and being a cheerleader for diversity won't make up for a lack of experience.

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  8. #33
    figuring it all out C Alberts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jennybhatt View Post
    . Being relatively new, Regal's discount to booksellers and their deal with Ingram isn't that great yet. However, they are making specific changes in the coming months, including w.r.t. IPG. Clearly, this kind of thing takes time. Ingram, IPG, etc., all also want to see some performance criteria met.
    Their discount through the wholesale side of Ingram has nothing to do with being new. It is a choice the publisher makes. They can get set up for a standard discount through Ingram wholesale whether they are a new or old publisher, or even a self-published author with just one book. The other part of Ingram, Ingram Publisher Services, functions as a full distribution system with better discounts, sales reps, etc, and it does require more vetting/qualifications, just like IPG et al. But not the wholesale arm, which is what I'm talking about.

    Quote Originally Posted by jennybhatt View Post
    This part of the publishing industry needs fixing, as we all know.
    I'm not sure I agree with you. But that's another whole conversation.


    Quote Originally Posted by jennybhatt View Post
    They have been making a concerted effort with authors and local bookstores, though. Follow the recently-published ones on Twitter and you get to see the events they're attending. That said, ALL small publishers struggle with getting mindshare. I've got writer friends who've published 4-5 books with small presses and they have to get their local indie bookstores to stock their books on consignment (meaning, the author buys the books, gives them to the bookstore to stock, and the bookstore pays the author if a copy is sold.) Here's more of their efforts in this area. Still new, but at least they're trying unlike many others: https://regalhousepublishing.com/201...l-ridge-books/.
    The link you provide is a to blog with a lovely post about a great independent bookstore. I'm not sure what it has to do with the publisher's efforts to make their books available to stores.

    To me the bottom line is this: If a new publisher is not willing/able to make their books available through Ingram wholesale at a regular discount with returnability, they are are not doing the bare minimum to get into stores. Between that and the lack of reviews in industry mags, and the lack of any distribution info for bookstores on their website (unless I am missing something?), it looks like they either don't want to get into stores or they don't know how to get into stores.

    It also makes it less likely that they will reach the criteria needed for a full-service distribution group to take them on any time soon.

    B&M distribution is not a priority for all publishers, and it doesn't need to be. If that's the case with Regal House, no worries. But if they genuinely want their books in physical stores, they need to make those books available to said stores.

    Look, I love small indie publishers. I love nothing better than getting cool, often obscure lit fic into the hands of readers and I go out of my way to do so. (Current examples: Montpelier Parade by Karl Geary - Catapult Press; Malagash by Joey Comeau - ECW Press; The Redemption of Galen Pike by Carys Davies - Biblioasis). Other new, small, or otherwise underdog-type indie presses I love are Belt Publishing and Two Dollar Radio. One by one, step by step, these folks have gotten a distributor or at the very least offer regular discounts on Ingram and are making efforts to work with stores by sending out galleys, offering to ship small minimum orders, etc. It is hard to sell their books because they generally have very little 'buzz', not much marketing, they almost never get NY Times reviews or NPR interviews or all those other big deal things, but booksellers love books and will make a lot of effort to promote the books we love.

    I know perfectly well that it is not easy. A good friend started a small press in my town. They just got accepted into IPG and it took a ton of effort (and, frankly, some connections, too). But as a bookseller I look at Regal House and think 'huh, those books could be good' but there's no info in the usual places about the quality of the books and how to get them - no galleys on edelweiss to look at, no PW reviews, no info about distribution and so forth. Given that I am making buying decisions every single week regarding hundreds of books as it is, ones that I can acquire through existing vendors and learn about in trusted sources, I say 'oh well, I guess they aren't looking for a bricks and mortar presence' and move on.

    It could very well be that Regal House is on track to get their books out into the world. If so, it would behoove them to at least mention on their website how bookstores can get their books if they want them. If they don't start strong, I fear they will bleed what money they have and run out of steam like so many others, taking the authors' work down with them (and that's really what this thread is about). In any case, without having looked closely at their books it does appear that they take this seriously and I wish them the best of luck.
    Last edited by C Alberts; 10-14-2017 at 10:16 PM.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by jennybhatt View Post
    I also take that long negative review on Amazon with a grain of salt. Historical scholars and historical fiction writers have always quibbled about such matters.
    To be clear, I'm not fussed that her book got a negative review, I'm fussed that her husband attacked the reviewer and called them a troll, and PJ/Jaynie herself responded at all.

    That said, if the editing on Regal's books has improved--and that looks to be the case--then Yay! I am glad to hear that! Seriously. I love it when publishers find their feet. The point of this forum is to provide as much information as possible, so some authors will want to give Regal a chance, and others will wait until they have more of a track record.

    And Jenny, thank you for providing more information. I really appreciate that, and I wish you all the best.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Filigree View Post
    And there is the flounce.

    I wish Jennybhatt well, and hope the publishing industry treats them kindly. But I do agree with many of the other posters: publishing isn't an entry level job, and being a cheerleader for diversity won't make up for a lack of experience.
    Ha. I tried to unsubscribe to this thread and de-register but I have been unable to do so. Have sent an email to the administrator to ask. In the meantime, I guess I'll respond.

    No "flouncing" here. My days of "flouncing" are, sadly well behind me. I just need to focus on my writing and try to avoid spending time online if I can. Plus I happen to be in a different time zone entirely so that doesn't help.

    Anyway, as I've mentioned in my earlier posts: every new publisher will have a growth/learning curve. And, quite frankly, if they say they don't, I'm more worried because it indicates they're not learning from their experiences on how to get better. I've also shared some specifics about what I dug into and learned about them, which is more than cheerleading for diversity. By no means am I suggesting that they're a perfect press. I haven't even signed up with them. I just wanted to balance the scales here, as I've said a couple of times, by sharing a bit of what I had discovered about them through asking them directly and doing just a bit more research.

    Peace. Again, no "flouncing" but writing is not my full-time career, so we take what we can in terms of time. I did not know, when I signed up, how active this forum/thread would get.

  11. #36
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    Flounced yet came back to flounce after explaining she no longer flounces.

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  12. #37
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    The problem with the growth/learning curve is that there just isn't time for it. This is what we mean when we say "publishing is not an entry-level position."

    Of course any good house should be able to learn and grow from mistakes. That is a pre-requisite. The problem that too often occurs with new, independent houses is that making those mistakes in the first place eats up capital, burns connections and goodwill, and results in badly-published books. Can these mistakes be overcome? Yes, with time. But time requires more money, because every book that doesn't sell--and there is growing evidence that Regal House books are not selling--costs money.

    Look through the index of this Bewares board: all the greyed-out houses are publishers that have gone bust, for one reason or another. Many of them had quite a bit of promise, at one time. Many had happy authors, particularly during production/editing. When the publisher runs out of money, author's books--intellectual property--can get tied up with creditors and rights reversions. Authors often don't get paid. Even if the rights do revert, the chances of success republishing the book after it's been badly published are not great.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by C Alberts View Post
    Their discount through the wholesale side of Ingram has nothing to do with being new. It is a choice the publisher makes. They can get set up for a standard discount through Ingram wholesale whether they are a new or old publisher, or even a self-published author with just one book. The other part of Ingram, Ingram Publisher Services, functions as a full distribution system with better discounts, sales reps, etc, and it does require more vetting/qualifications, just like IPG et al. But not the wholesale arm, which is what I'm talking about.
    Fair enough. I don’t know much about how this distribution side of the business works. I was going by what my bookseller friend had said. She had not made a distinction between the wholesale side and the full distribution system as you have done. I’ll check back with her to clarify for my own knowledge. Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by C Alberts View Post
    I'm not sure I agree with you. But that's another whole conversation.
    This is based on stuff I’ve read and heard about how bookselling has changed due to online sales and also POD vs print runs. But, you’re right. It’s another whole conversation and nothing to do specifically with this thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by C Alberts View Post
    The link you provide is a to blog with a lovely post about a great independent bookstore. I'm not sure what it has to do with the publisher's efforts to make their books available to stores.
    Actually, the key was the intro section of that blog post about how they’ve started the initiative to connect their authors to their local bookstores. There’s two aspects, surely, to getting mindshare at brick-and-mortar bookstores. The first is actually getting onto their shelves, which we discussed in relation to distribution, etc. The second is getting authors there live in front of readers so they can move more books. This initiative, as I understand it, is related to the latter and not the former. As I mentioned in my earlier post from where you took the quote, I know writer friends who have to buy their own books and give to their local bookstores to carry on consignment. Even then, they often get relegated to the “Local Interest” shelves. So, for a small, new press to do an initiative like this (and there are actually more such bookstore-related posts on their LinkedIn profile than the link I shared) is worth noting, I thought. I have submitted my book to over 20 presses now and, of the ones that are still relatively new, not a single one is doing anything like this.

    Quote Originally Posted by C Alberts View Post
    To me the bottom line is this: If a new publisher is not willing/able to make their books available through Ingram wholesale at a regular discount with returnability, they are are not doing the bare minimum to get into stores. Between that and the lack of reviews in industry mags, and the lack of any distribution info for bookstores on their website (unless I am missing something?), it looks like they either don't want to get into stores or they don't know how to get into stores.

    It also makes it less likely that they will reach the criteria needed for a full-service distribution group to take them on any time soon.

    B&M distribution is not a priority for all publishers, and it doesn't need to be. If that's the case with Regal House, no worries. But if they genuinely want their books in physical stores, they need to make those books available to said stores.
    I agree with you about making efforts to get into physical stores. And I asked them about this via email. As I mentioned in an earlier post, they gave me a specific response of upcoming changes in this area, starting next month. Now, due to confidentiality, I am not sharing all that. I simply mention it so others are aware that we do not always know ALL that is happening behind the scenes so it is dangerous to make assumptions without first asking the source, if we can.

    Quote Originally Posted by C Alberts View Post
    Look, I love small indie publishers. I love nothing better than getting cool, often obscure lit fic into the hands of readers and I go out of my way to do so. (Current examples: Montpelier Parade by Karl Geary - Catapult Press; Malagash by Joey Comeau - ECW Press; The Redemption of Galen Pike by Carys Davies - Biblioasis). Other new, small, or otherwise underdog-type indie presses I love are Belt Publishing and Two Dollar Radio. One by one, step by step, these folks have gotten a distributor or at the very least offer regular discounts on Ingram and are making efforts to work with stores by sending out galleys, offering to ship small minimum orders, etc. It is hard to sell their books because they generally have very little 'buzz', not much marketing, they almost never get NY Times reviews or NPR interviews or all those other big deal things, but booksellers love books and will make a lot of effort to promote the books we love.
    I love Catapult / Black Balloon too. And that Carys Davies book — I bought it after reading one of her short stories on Lit Hub. Great choice.

    From what I know, though, these other presses have been around longer than Regal. Right? It wasn’t easy for them either, was it, to achieve this: “One by one, step by step, these folks have gotten a distributor or at the very least offer regular discounts on Ingram and are making efforts to work with stores by sending out galleys, offering to ship small minimum orders, etc. It is hard to sell their books because they generally have very little 'buzz', not much marketing, they almost never get NY Times reviews or NPR interviews or all those other big deal things, but booksellers love books and will make a lot of effort to promote the books we love.” And they still find it hard to sell their books, of course. It’s tough for indie presses overall, new or not.

    Quote Originally Posted by C Alberts View Post
    I know perfectly well that it is not easy. A good friend started a small press in my town. They just got accepted into IPG and it took a ton of effort (and, frankly, some connections, too). But as a bookseller I look at Regal House and think 'huh, those books could be good' but there's no info in the usual places about the quality of the books and how to get them - no galleys on edelweiss to look at, no PW reviews, no info about distribution and so forth. Given that I am making buying decisions every single week regarding hundreds of books as it is, ones that I can acquire through existing vendors and learn about in trusted sources, I say 'oh well, I guess they aren't looking for a bricks and mortar presence' and move on.
    Yes, this is an absolutely valid point. There needs to be more visibility. No question.

    Quote Originally Posted by C Alberts View Post
    It could very well be that Regal House is on track to get their books out into the world. If so, it would behoove them to at least mention on their website how bookstores can get their books if they want them. If they don't start strong, I fear they will bleed what money they have and run out of steam like so many others, taking the authors' work down with them (and that's really what this thread is about).
    Yes. There should be more on the website for how bookstores can get their books if they want them. Agreed.

    Quote Originally Posted by C Alberts View Post
    In any case, without having looked closely at their books it does appear that they take this seriously and I wish them the best of luck.
    And, yes, from everything I have read and discussed directly with them, I agree with you on this too.

    Thanks again for your insights. Much appreciated.
    Last edited by jennybhatt; 10-15-2017 at 06:33 AM.

  14. #39
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    Quote Originally Posted by eqb View Post
    To be clear, I'm not fussed that her book got a negative review, I'm fussed that her husband attacked the reviewer and called them a troll, and PJ/Jaynie herself responded at all.
    Yeah. I didn't see the husband's comment. It has been removed, so that's a good thing. Shows rational minds prevailed.

    Quote Originally Posted by eqb View Post
    That said, if the editing on Regal's books has improved--and that looks to be the case--then Yay! I am glad to hear that! Seriously. I love it when publishers find their feet. The point of this forum is to provide as much information as possible, so some authors will want to give Regal a chance, and others will wait until they have more of a track record.
    Right? That was my thinking too. As I've mentioned several times in earlier posts, if they weren't getting better with their book choices, their editing, their marketing/promo, etc., with each new book, then I'd be more willing to dismiss them outright. Always look for the vector, not just the acceleration of a growth trajectory.

    And, absolutely, a writer must choose based on his/her comfort level and circumstances. I used this example recently: I invest in the stock market. But I don't have the stomach to be a day trader. I stick with long bets and I get out when things get too frothy. I have a friend who has a greater appetite for risk and is willing to invest the time and effort needed for day-trading. Each to their own. Despite our different approaches, we both do our homework before picking a stock. Our criteria and our biases toward those criteria may be different, but the due diligence has to happen.

    Quote Originally Posted by eqb View Post
    And Jenny, thank you for providing more information. I really appreciate that, and I wish you all the best.
    You're most welcome. I'm glad we got some productive dialogue out of it. Certainly, I learned more too. Thank you also.

  15. #40
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    Quote Originally Posted by VeryBigBeard View Post
    The problem with the growth/learning curve is that there just isn't time for it. This is what we mean when we say "publishing is not an entry-level position."

    Of course any good house should be able to learn and grow from mistakes. That is a pre-requisite. The problem that too often occurs with new, independent houses is that making those mistakes in the first place eats up capital, burns connections and goodwill, and results in badly-published books. Can these mistakes be overcome? Yes, with time. But time requires more money, because every book that doesn't sell--and there is growing evidence that Regal House books are not selling--costs money.

    Look through the index of this Bewares board: all the greyed-out houses are publishers that have gone bust, for one reason or another. Many of them had quite a bit of promise, at one time. Many had happy authors, particularly during production/editing. When the publisher runs out of money, author's books--intellectual property--can get tied up with creditors and rights reversions. Authors often don't get paid. Even if the rights do revert, the chances of success republishing the book after it's been badly published are not great.
    All fair points. It's tough for indie presses to get up and running, to grow, and to survive. No question. I am not disputing any of it and have, over the years, seen it happen to writer friends. Two of my friends had their presses shut up shop just before launching their books and despite having a full slate of upcoming releases. In both cases, it was due to personal reasons as the founders/publishers had family illnesses. Tough for the writers and the publishers.

    All the more reason for writers to do their homework and dig deeper into specifics, which is what I am trying to do. And that is what this forum's goal is too, I understand.

    Thanks. And peace.
    Last edited by jennybhatt; 10-15-2017 at 06:58 AM.

  16. #41
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    Quote Originally Posted by BenPanced View Post
    Flounced yet came back to flounce after explaining she no longer flounces.

    That word does not mean what you think it means.
    I was being sarcastic.

    I do know what it means: "To leave an internet group or thread with exaggerated drama; deleting posts, notifying mods and or group users, and cross-posting on other groups to draw attention to the drama."

    I did not create any exaggerated drama, delete any posts, cross-post anywhere else, notify any other users, etc. I only joined this forum literally a day or so ago for this thread alone. And, when I felt the discussion had lived its productive life, I said I needed to move on. That's not "flouncing" in my book. But, fine. It may be in someone else's and I'm not here to try to change their mind. By all means, if you'd like to think I'm flouncing, feel free to do so.

    That said, I cannot figure out how to "de-register" and stop getting notifications. That's my problem to figure out and which is why I ended up back here.

    Peace.

  17. #42
    Mushroom Polenth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jennybhatt View Post
    Peace, my friend. We are both on the same side of truth, justice, diversity, and good work in publishing. Getting upset at each other for what we perceive as "intent" does those causes no good. Let's discuss the merits of the facts/evidence and move on from there. That will be of larger benefit to others here as well. All the best.
    I can't feel anger. We're not friends. I have no connection to you, the publisher, or anyone else involved. My comments come from watching the patterns of presses that fail and the occasional optimism that showing people the patterns might help them avoid mistakes. What you do with that information is up to you, but do consider that patterns are still factual. They're more abstract and take a larger sample to see, but they're not works of fiction.

    To remove notifications, all you have to do is unsubscribe from the thread. Just above the posts, but below where there's a "reply to thread" button, there's a little toolbar. One of those options is "Thread Tools". That lets you subscribe and unsubscribe from threads. The forum account will just sit and do nothing with no notifications set, and you'll likely want it in a few years to post an update on your situation.
    * Polenth *

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  18. #43
    Heckuva good sport frimble3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jennybhatt View Post
    In both cases, it was due to personal reasons as the founders/publishers had family illnesses. Tough for the writers and the publishers.
    Which is why really small publishers are watched warily. If it's essentially one person making all the decisions, if something happens to them, the whole enterprise may fall apart. (Ditto, publishers who talk a lot about their families and pets, or their own writing or side-gigs - handling other people's books is not a part-time job.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Polenth View Post
    .
    To remove notifications, all you have to do is unsubscribe from the thread. Just above the posts, but below where there's a "reply to thread" button, there's a little toolbar. One of those options is "Thread Tools". That lets you subscribe and unsubscribe from threads. The forum account will just sit and do nothing with no notifications set, and you'll likely want it in a few years to post an update on your situation.
    Or, you may want to browse around now. This is, after all, only one thread of many.

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