Welcome to the AbsoluteWrite Water Cooler! Please read The Newbie Guide To Absolute Write

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 74

Thread: Soup-lovers

  1. #26
    I'm writing. Undistractable. mccardey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Australia.
    Posts
    8,056
    Quote Originally Posted by SaraP View Post
    I make veggie soup almost every week and have never followed a recipe.
    Fine for veggie soup, but if you do that with ribollita, you leave out the juniper. Which is where I was going wrong.

  2. #27
    I'm writing. Undistractable. mccardey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Australia.
    Posts
    8,056
    I got a translation up for the recipe. I can't make it myself, till I'm back at home in my kitchen - but I think it should work.

    If it doesn't, it's my fault, not Elena's. I'm going to learn Italian next year.... *blush*

  3. #28
    AW's Most Adorable Sociopath TedTheewen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    In a van parked outside of your house.
    Posts
    14,058
    A few weeks ago I made the best split pea and leek soup I've ever made. It was seriously faboo.

    I'm trying to get out of the habit of using smoked ham hocks because of the grease. Next time I'll try smoked neck bones in cheese cloth. But recently I found some ham base at the local Mennonite bulk foods store and I have to say, it worked well as an enhancer. I normally avoid the freeze-dried bases because of the salt but this one wasn't that bad. No label on it, sadly.

    I love to use The Soup Book by Louis P. DeGouy. It has some great dumpling recipes, too. I recently made some chicken and dumplings but I used my grandmother's recipe.

  4. #29
    Megalops Erectus Silver King's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Florida (West Central)
    Posts
    12,437
    When I'm pressed for time or feeling too lazy to make chowder from scratch, I resort to a fast, simple recipe that is flavorful and satisfying. Below is an example using shrimp, which can be substituted for other types of fish and even cooked chicken or turkey if you have any on hand.

    Ingredients:

    1 medium, or half of a large, onion chopped

    2 tablespoon butter

    2 (10 3/4 oz) cans condensed cream of potato soup

    3 1/2 cups milk

    1 1/2 lbs medium shrimp, frozen and thawed or fresh, peeled and de-veined and cut into halves.

    1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

    2/3 cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese

    Fresh chopped parsley for garnish

    Preparation:

    Saute the chopped onion in butter for a few minutes over medium heat until soft. While that's cooking, empty the cans of potato soup into a large bowl, then whisk in milk until smooth. Add the mixture and pepper to the onions and bring to a gentle boil. Stir in shrimp and reduce heat to barely a simmer. The shrimp should turn pink in color within three to four minutes, showing they are cooked through. Remove chowder from heat, stir in cheese and serve immediately with chopped parsley sprinkled on top.

    Serves three to four.

    Note I: Don't overcook the shrimp! Less time is better than too much in most fish recipes.

    Note II: When your dinner guests compliment you on such a fine chowder, there's no need to tell them that it took you, from start to finish, about twenty minutes to make.

  5. #30
    Cultus Gopherus MacAllister SuperModerator Medievalist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    An meodoheall monig dreama full
    Posts
    25,530
    Quote Originally Posted by Sarita View Post
    I was inspired and made Italian Wedding soup. Yum. Homemade meat balls, loads of spinach, it was soooo good. Thanks for the idea!
    Recipe or it didn't happen!

    (Please?)

    AW Admin
    About.Me
    AWers On Twitter
    Lisa L. Spangenberg
    My opinions are my own. | Who else would want them?

  6. #31
    AW's Most Adorable Sociopath TedTheewen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    In a van parked outside of your house.
    Posts
    14,058
    I dearly love a good Italian soup. The spicier the better!

  7. #32
    blue eyed floozy shakeysix's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    St. John, Kansas
    Posts
    8,100
    I'm a pozole freak--anyone else? --s6

  8. #33
    AW's Most Adorable Sociopath TedTheewen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    In a van parked outside of your house.
    Posts
    14,058
    Quote Originally Posted by shakeysix View Post
    I'm a pozole freak--anyone else? --s6
    I love pozole! I can't get it around here, though. Eventually I'm gonna have to venture on my own to make it. And it has to have fresh chopped Jalapenos on the side!

  9. #34
    crazy spec fic writer L M Ashton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Johor Bahru, Malaysia
    Posts
    4,974
    I had tom yum soup. I'm sick. I have a cold. I've been eating nothing but soup for days.

  10. #35
    blue eyed floozy shakeysix's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    St. John, Kansas
    Posts
    8,100
    Im lucky enough to live in an area where I can get my pozole fix in local restaurants. I first had it in Puebla while I was going to school there. I like the cabbage and lime add- ins best. We are in a blizzard today but when I get back to school I'll see if I can get an authentic recipe from one of my Mexican friends. I know it involves hominy and peppers, which is okay with me, but not sure how the pork comes into the soup.

    They serve chicken soup at the local Mexican restaurants, too. I'm craving it on a day like today but I'd have to drive to get it. Not tortilla soup, which is good too, but huge chunks of chicken, peppers and avocados in a broth that varies from restaurant to restaurant.

    I did make up a hamburger soup last night--fresh mushrooms, carrots, zucchini, frozen corn and peas. I found the recipe in Taste of Home years ago. The original recipe was for two servings--perfect when my dad was living with me. I stretched the recipe this time--this is the best soup for sitting out a blizzard and walk shoveling! -s6
    Last edited by shakeysix; 02-21-2013 at 11:58 PM.

  11. #36
    PBS Mind/MTV World Sarita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    PSU
    Posts
    8,910
    Quote Originally Posted by Medievalist View Post
    Recipe or it didn't happen!

    (Please?)
    Absolutely! Give me until tonight and you'll have it.
    ~Sara

    Winter is on my head, but eternal spring is in my heart.~ Hugo

  12. #37
    PBS Mind/MTV World Sarita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    PSU
    Posts
    8,910
    Quote Originally Posted by Medievalist View Post
    Recipe or it didn't happen!

    (Please?)
    Ok, here we go. The recipe I used was adapted from this EDF magazine. But I'm never happy with a recipe as-is.

    Meatballs:

    1/2 lb ground turkey
    1/2 lb ground pork
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    1 large egg, lightly beaten
    1/2 cup panko
    1/4 cup grated Parmesan, plus more for serving
    Coarse salt and ground pepper

    Combine and roll into small meatballs. I actually doubled this so that I had an extra batch to toss in the freezer. I hate making (er, cleaning) the mess, so I try to make more than one meal at a time

    For the Soup, I really went another direction:

    Olive Oil for sauteing
    1 yellow onion, chopped
    4 Carrots, chopped
    2 Celery Stalks, chopped
    12 oz Baby Spinach (or Kale, I went 1/2 & 1/2)
    8 Cups Chicken Stock (I used Wegman's Organic brand because I was out of my own)
    1 Cup of Orzo Pasta
    1 Sprig of Thyme, tied to the side of my pot


    In a medium cast iron pot, saute onions for 3 minutes, then add the carrots and celery. Saute for another 4 minutes until onions are translucent. Add stock and thyme. Bring to a low boil and add the meatballs, one at a time, careful they don't stick. Once the heat comes back up, add the pasta and cook for 10-12 minutes. I added the greens just before serving because I like a little more crunch, but you could add them about 3-4 minutes before serving if you like them more wilted.

    Top with Parm and serve. Yum.
    ~Sara

    Winter is on my head, but eternal spring is in my heart.~ Hugo

  13. #38
    Up all night to get Loki Jersey Chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    in the state of carefully controlled chaos
    Posts
    12,293
    Every time I roast a chicken (which is fairly often) I make stock from the leftover carcass, so I always have a TON of chicken stock in my freezer. The two soups I make most often are garlic soup and tomato fennel.

    I love me a good soup.
    "Growing old is inevitable. Growing up is optional." ~ scarletpeaches



    My books... Go ahead. You know you want to...


    My Blog Facebook Twitter and last, but not least, my Website

  14. #39
    PBS Mind/MTV World Sarita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    PSU
    Posts
    8,910
    Quote Originally Posted by Jersey Chick View Post
    Every time I roast a chicken (which is fairly often) I make stock from the leftover carcass, so I always have a TON of chicken stock in my freezer. The two soups I make most often are garlic soup and tomato fennel.

    I love me a good soup.
    Me, too. Only, I make so much soup and use it in many other applications, that I use it up really quickly. Home made stock is the bomb!
    ~Sara

    Winter is on my head, but eternal spring is in my heart.~ Hugo

  15. #40
    Up all night to get Loki Jersey Chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    in the state of carefully controlled chaos
    Posts
    12,293
    I go through almost as fast as I make it. When Hurricane Irene hit and we lost power, I lost all of what I had in the freezer and that upset me more than throwing out all the other food.
    "Growing old is inevitable. Growing up is optional." ~ scarletpeaches



    My books... Go ahead. You know you want to...


    My Blog Facebook Twitter and last, but not least, my Website

  16. #41
    Leaving on the 2:19
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,353
    Ha! I can so relate. When the blizzard took out the power at my house a couple of weeks ago, the only things I bothered to pack into plastic bags and bury in the snow bank outside my kitchen window were the ice cube trays full of homemade chicken and fish stock.

  17. #42
    Girl Detective AW Moderator Stacia Kane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    In cahoots with the other boo-birds
    Posts
    8,147
    Hee, I save my carcasses until I have too many to keep in the freezer, and then make a huge batch of stock, too.

    Do you guys save the gizzards and stuff for the stock, too? I admit I always toss them. Apparently livers can make the stock taste "off." I do occasionally buy a few thighs or offcuts to simmer in there, too, though.
    http://www.staciakane.com

    FIVE DOWN, a Downside anthology, available now!
    Four previously published short stories and one brand new novella, together in one volume.

    Click here for more details.


    WRONG WAYS DOWN available now!


  18. #43
    Up all night to get Loki Jersey Chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    in the state of carefully controlled chaos
    Posts
    12,293
    I throw out the gizzards and neck - ew. I can't make myself even touch the baggie - I use tongs. What a wuss I am.


    Last Thanksgiving, I planned on saving the turkey carcass and making turkey stock, but I found out none of my knives (which suck on a good day. Dear Santa, please bring me new knives) were sharp enough to get through the bones and I don't have a stock pot big enough to stuff a 20lb turkey carcass in (Dear Santa, a BIG stock pot would be nice, too.)
    "Growing old is inevitable. Growing up is optional." ~ scarletpeaches



    My books... Go ahead. You know you want to...


    My Blog Facebook Twitter and last, but not least, my Website

  19. #44
    practical experience, FTW RedRajah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1,020
    We tried this Thai Butternut Soup a couple of nights ago. Not bad. Got to use up my homemade chicken stock for it.

    I'm still trying to tweak my stock recipe. Last time out, I didn't use enough chicken feet for it, so it wasn't as rich as I usually like it. Likewise, I didn't roast my bones as I wanted to go for a lighter color.

  20. #45
    Megalops Erectus Silver King's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Florida (West Central)
    Posts
    12,437
    Quote Originally Posted by Jersey Chick View Post
    ...Last Thanksgiving, I planned on saving the turkey carcass and making turkey stock, but I found out none of my knives (which suck on a good day. Dear Santa, please bring me new knives) were sharp enough to get through the bones...
    A good, sharp meat cleaver can be used to chop through bone more easily than most knives.

    Also, if your knives are of decent quality, honing them often with a sharpening steel will help to keep them in top form almost indefinitely without the need to replace them.

    The best quality kitchen knives I've ever purchased were for my daughter as one of her gifts when she was married. Within a year, all of them had been misused to the point where they couldn't cut through the crap of a conversation, let alone soft meat.

    She blamed her husband for their sorry state, but either way, it was sad to see great cutlery abused and wasted in such a fashion.

  21. #46
    practical experience, FTW RedRajah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1,020
    Quote Originally Posted by Silver King View Post
    A good, sharp meat cleaver can be used to chop through bone more easily than most knives.

    Also, if your knives are of decent quality, honing them often with a sharpening steel will help to keep them in top form almost indefinitely without the need to replace them.

    The best quality kitchen knives I've ever purchased were for my daughter as one of her gifts when she was married. Within a year, all of them had been misused to the point where they couldn't cut through the crap of a conversation, let alone soft meat.

    She blamed her husband for their sorry state, but either way, it was sad to see great cutlery abused and wasted in such a fashion.
    I keep trying to correct the husband as to which knife to use when, but the lesson has yet to stick. We've already lost the tip off of one of the steak knives (!) when he used it to cut up a raw onion.

  22. #47
    Great chieftain o the puddin'-race SuperModerator Haggis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    In your worst nightmare
    Posts
    50,320
    I don't do soups. Not because I don't want to, but because I'm not good at them. Except for lobster stew.

    But I had this idea of a chicken stock based soup with leeks and celery, perhaps some cream, and then some added Stilton cheese. Can any of you soup makers help me here? Is this workable?
    Quote Originally Posted by swachski View Post
    Thanks for all your hard work, Haggis! You are the best mod ever!

    Stewie the Chihuey
    featuring the lovely and talented



  23. #48
    AW's Most Adorable Sociopath TedTheewen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    In a van parked outside of your house.
    Posts
    14,058
    Quote Originally Posted by Haggis View Post
    I don't do soups. Not because I don't want to, but because I'm not good at them. Except for lobster stew.

    But I had this idea of a chicken stock based soup with leeks and celery, perhaps some cream, and then some added Stilton cheese. Can any of you soup makers help me here? Is this workable?
    I love Stilton! There is a wonderful cheese shop near me (of course) that gets Stilton imported from England. I'll look to see about a Stilton soup.

    Are you looking for a cheese soup, similar to a cheddar soup? Or are you looking for perhaps a puffy cheese dumping to go with the soup?

    Tonight I'm going to experiment with a new dumpling recipe that includes an egg. Normally I have avoided those but according to the book I mentioned previously in this thread adding an egg will make the dumpling more airy.

  24. #49
    Girl Detective AW Moderator Stacia Kane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    In cahoots with the other boo-birds
    Posts
    8,147
    Quote Originally Posted by TedTheewen View Post

    Are you looking for a cheese soup, similar to a cheddar soup? Or are you looking for perhaps a puffy cheese dumping to go with the soup?
    This is my question, too. I'm not a fan of Stilton (or any blue cheese/really strong cheese) so can't say how well it might melt into a soup; I've never cooked with it. But my first thought was to do something like:

    saute/sweat the leeks and celery in a bit of butter & olive oil. I'd suggest maybe Herbs de Provence here, too; I think they'd be nice. I'd also suggest some potatoes, maybe, if you're looking to add something to give it more substance?

    Then add your stock, and simmer for a bit, then add cream and blend well, and simmer for a bit.

    Again, I don't know if here you'd add cubes/crumbles of Stilton and let them melt in, or if you'd like to do something like a French Onion soup, where you pop croutons on the top, cover them with cheese, and stick it under the broiler to melt it? Or, yeah, like a cheesy dumpling?



    Tonight I'm going to experiment with a new dumpling recipe that includes an egg. Normally I have avoided those but according to the book I mentioned previously in this thread adding an egg will make the dumpling more airy.
    Eh. I tried a dumpling recipe once that included egg, and wasn't at all pleased with the result. They were pretty stodgy. An egg can really give bread richness and lift, though--I came up with a new bread recipe a few weeks ago and have been making it pretty obsessively since, and it includes an egg--so it may have just been the recipe I tried.

    Do let us know how it turns out!
    http://www.staciakane.com

    FIVE DOWN, a Downside anthology, available now!
    Four previously published short stories and one brand new novella, together in one volume.

    Click here for more details.


    WRONG WAYS DOWN available now!


  25. #50
    Up all night to get Loki Jersey Chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    in the state of carefully controlled chaos
    Posts
    12,293
    Quote Originally Posted by Silver King View Post
    A good, sharp meat cleaver can be used to chop through bone more easily than most knives.

    Also, if your knives are of decent quality, honing them often with a sharpening steel will help to keep them in top form almost indefinitely without the need to replace them.

    The best quality kitchen knives I've ever purchased were for my daughter as one of her gifts when she was married. Within a year, all of them had been misused to the point where they couldn't cut through the crap of a conversation, let alone soft meat.

    She blamed her husband for their sorry state, but either way, it was sad to see great cutlery abused and wasted in such a fashion.
    They weren't great knives and I've had them almost 16 years (bridal shower gift) so I don't feel guilty about wanting new ones. They'll be a gift to me.

    A cleaver is something I don't have. That will have to change, although I think the temptation to throw it at my husband might be too strong to resist at times.... just sayin'.
    "Growing old is inevitable. Growing up is optional." ~ scarletpeaches



    My books... Go ahead. You know you want to...


    My Blog Facebook Twitter and last, but not least, my Website

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Custom Search