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Thread: Village Green Press, LLC

  1. #1
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    Village Green Press, LLC

    Am posting this here because I just saw them advertising in a Facebook indie writing group I'm a member of. (Advertisement here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/indi...0826998929790/ )

    I'm looking for a few good manuscripts. http://villagegreenpressLLC.com/. We're a boutique publisher offering a full range of services both for self-pubbers and those who wish to pursue more traditional publishing outlets.
    I checked out their website (which is here: http://www.villagegreenpressllc.com/ ). I don't plan to sign with them or anything, but I thought I'd start a thread here for other people to contribute information for writers potentially considering this publisher.

  2. #2
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    I will say this alone alarms me:

    Village Green's new Agent Link Service!

    Whether you've already tested the waters of self publishing
    or your manuscript has been making the frustrating and often tedious rounds of submissions only to be rejected, here at VG, we know that every good writer deserves a dedicated and professional representative.

    It's all a matter of contacts. With more than 30 years in the business, we know just how rapidly the players change and who the real players are. We will strive to help you place your book with someone who really believes in their authors and will work hard to get you where you need to be.

    Today's agent representative is a multi tasker: They watch the trends, protect your contractual rights and make sure you publish succesfully. A good agent can handle ebooks, print books and foreign and subsidiary rights, all of which serve to increase YOUR revenues.

    Too often, authors remain satisfied with the first agent who says yes to their submission, only to be disappointed when, after a month or so, their phone calls aren't returned.

    We believe writers deserve better than a cold shoulder. Each and every one of our agents has a proven track record in the industry and a sincere desire to help authors succeed.

    Our reputable agent contacts work for YOU, the writer, not the other way around.
    And while every author may not yet be ready for acceptance into our program, once you are, we're confident you can raise your expectations about what to expect from your agent.

    To have your manuscript evaluated for our program, please contact us with a brief intro
    to your book and your background, including your manuscript as a .doc attachment.

    Cost: JUST 59.95 for the next 30 days!!!!
    Source: http://www.villagegreenpressllc.com/#!new!-agent-link!!

  3. #3
    but appreciated anyway... Unimportant's Avatar
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    Any place that says "Payment plans for every need and budget" is definitely not a commercial press or legitimate literary agent.

  4. #4
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    Cost: JUST 59.95 for the next 30 days!!!!
    This says it all.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unimportant View Post
    Any place that says "Payment plans for every need and budget" is definitely not a commercial press or legitimate literary agent.
    Not to mention, a legit publisher wouldn't spam a writing group on Facebook, amirite?

    I've been digging a little further and also see this under "About":

    Founded by veterans in the industry...
    But never once, anywhere on the website, do you see who these supposed veterans are. And the WHOIS information doesn't tell you anything either.

  6. #6
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    Last edited by CaoPaux; 11-16-2011 at 02:45 AM.
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  7. #7
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    Hello, Cao and Jessica,

    This is Lisa Adams and I am Teresa Kennedy’s business partner at Village Green Press LLC. I am absolutely horrified by what I am reading here. As an attorney it also concerns me for a number of reasons.

    First, Village Green Press LLC is an LLC organized and in good standing in Nebraska. You can go to the Nebraska Secretary of State’s office and check.

    Second, what is of concern is that disparaging allegations were made that both SFWA’s “Absolute Write” and Preditors & Editors have warnings about our company and then publishing this information to the public at large. This was done by Jessica on Facebook at Indie Writers Unite and now, here.

    For Jessica's edification, both Teresa and I use Twitter and Facebook to promote our publishing house and the books we publish. That that would cause alarm or be surprising or suspicious in any way is bizarre.

    Third, Victoria Strauss received an e-mail from me when we launched telling her exactly who we are and what we do. I did this because as an author who was taken advantage of by an unscrupulous publisher (Archebooks Publishing - I posted as prsctrli because, well, I used to be a prosecutor), she responded personally to my concerns and action was taken. I believed she would be happy to read of what had happened since then and to look at our site precisely to avoid this sort of public trashing not grounded in fact and also because I used this site a lot when I started out.

    Fourth, our first call for manuscripts was done by Teresa on Craig’s List before we launched. I understand that P&E gives “red flags” that might indicate that a business is a scam; and I am aware that posting on Craig’s List might indicate this. But it does not ALWAYS mean that the business is illegitimate.

    Fifth, this company has both traditional and e-publishing capability through Lightning Source where we have a company account. That is how we physically generate books as do innumerable other publishing houses large and small.

    Sixth, as is the case with most publishers, Teresa is an “in-house” editor; and Andrew Earley is our in-house cover artist. If an author’s work is as ready as it would have to be for a “big house” to go to press or e-reader, then we would offer a traditional contract. If not we send the author a rejection letter.

    Seventh, in the rejection letter we do specify that we offer certain editorial and self publishing options if the author so desires.

    Eighth, offering an option to polish a manuscript or help an author publish their own book is not "forcing” someone to use our editorial services. That idea is not only incorrect, it is patently absurd.

    Ninth, Teresa has the professional editorial experience with big houses both as an editor and author, to substantiate her ability to not only spot work that is commercially-viable; but also to edit work. Our cover artist, Andrew Earley, continues to do covers for the big houses in New York including DAW and others.

    Tenth, we are a start-up. To have to now field negative and incorrect commentary about us is offensive and denigrates the idea that small indie houses are worth a damn. We started VGP LLC with the goal of finding writers whose voices might never be welcomed by big houses to publish traditionally.

    Eleventh, Teresa Kennedy has authored or co-authored at least 30 books published through houses such as NAL, Simon & Schuster, St. Martin's Press, Rio Nuevo Press, Ballantine, Avon, and others; and through packagers such as Joostelffers Books, Bruck Books, Evans and many others. She worked as an Editor at Grosset & Dunlap, Putnam, Viking Press, Rio Nuevo, Ballantine, and others; as a Senior Editor at Grosset & Dunlap, Human Sciences Press; and acquisitions editor at such houses as Rio Nuevo Press, Human Sciences Press, and Berkely Press, and Dutton, among others.

    She has worked for agents such as Books Crossing Borders, Susan Ann Protter Literary Agency, Susan Herner Agency, and the Rights Unlimited Agency,

    She is more than willing to post her resume because this mess Jessica started has done damage that was thoughtless and unnecessary.

    I would appreciate a more positive approach to new publishers and not allowing members to jump on the “they must be a scam” bandwagon without adequate information or investigation of credentials. Teresa is now horribly upset and understandably so - and for Jessica's information, Teresa was not making a "sales pitch" at you when she tried to respond to your assertion we are a scam publisher. She was trying to tell you her qualifications since you seem to question her being a veteran in the industry.


  8. #8
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    And to "Unimportant" we are a commercial press and NOT a literary agent...

  9. #9
    but appreciated anyway... Unimportant's Avatar
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    So Village Green offers:
    1. Editing (for a fee, specified with three exclamation points)
    2. Placement with a literary agent (cost unspecified)
    3. Cover art design (cost unspecified)
    4. Book publishing (unclear if this is commercial author-gets-paid or vanity pay-to-play)

    First, I see a major conflict of interest between #1 and #4. Second, the idea of submitting my manuscript to a publisher so that they can hook me up with a literary agent seems very backwards. And third -- I'm very supportive of small presses, but in this case, based on the info available on your website, the inherent conflicts of interest between one group wearing the hats of publisher and paid editor and agent-liaison is a bit much for me.
    Last edited by Unimportant; 12-01-2011 at 07:18 AM. Reason: adding link

  10. #10
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    I am absolutely horrified by what I am reading here. As an attorney it also concerns me for a number of reasons.
    So it's "horrifying" that people would want to inquire after a publisher and gather information on them, whether good or bad, if not for their own information then for the information of other writers searching the boards?


    Second, what is of concern is that disparaging allegations were made that both SFWA’s “Absolute Write” and Preditors & Editors have warnings about our company and then publishing this information to the public at large. This was done by Jessica on Facebook at Indie Writers Unite and now, here.
    This is a public message forum for writers who are seeking information on publishers. Therefore, good and bad things may surface. As a business, you should be aware of this.

    For Jessica's edification, both Teresa and I use Twitter and Facebook to promote our publishing house and the books we publish. That that would cause alarm or be surprising or suspicious in any way is bizarre.
    This would be fine, if you were actually active participants in IWU. As it is, you're doing hit and run SPAMMING messages in the hopes of roping in authors who have dedicated themselves to doing things independently and helping each other as such.

    Fourth, our first call for manuscripts was done by Teresa on Craig’s List before we launched. I understand that P&E gives “red flags” that might indicate that a business is a scam; and I am aware that posting on Craig’s List might indicate this. But it does not ALWAYS mean that the business is illegitimate.
    A good, legitimate publisher, however, should not have to or need to spam writing groups on facebook and message boards on the internet to garner manuscript submissions.


    Seventh, in the rejection letter we do specify that we offer certain editorial and self publishing options if the author so desires.

    Eighth, offering an option to polish a manuscript or help an author publish their own book is not "forcing” someone to use our editorial services. That idea is not only incorrect, it is patently absurd.
    Please point to anywhere in this thread where I or anyone else used the word "forcing" and said that someone would be "forced" to use your editorial services.

    The fact of the matter is that it's a potential conflict of interest to offer "Agent Link" services and other similar services and to serve as both agent and publisher. If you haven't done so (and by appearances, your website isn't showing this), then you need to delineate and outline exactly how you plan to avoid said conflict of interest for potential writers/customers. (Of course, the best way to prevent conflict of interest is to avoid it to begin with.)


    Tenth, we are a start-up. To have to now field negative and incorrect commentary about us is offensive and denigrates the idea that small indie houses are worth a damn. We started VGP LLC with the goal of finding writers whose voices might never be welcomed by big houses to publish traditionally.
    I don't know where you get this idea that I think small indie houses "aren't worth a damn." I'm signed to an indie house. I used to work for one.

    She is more than willing to post her resume because this mess Jessica started has done damage that was thoughtless and unnecessary.
    It's been, oh, I don't know, twenty minutes? That's hardly enough time to cause "thoughtless and unnecessary" damage. If anything, I think your response here, jumping on me and listing all your points as you have, is incredibly condescending and could potentially cause more damage than any questioning I could have had regarding your press.

    I would appreciate a more positive approach to new publishers and not allowing members to jump on the “they must be a scam” bandwagon without adequate information or investigation of credentials.
    What do you think we do here? Sing every small publishers praises? With the number of scammers out there, you can hardly blame writers for being overly cautious. And your site had enough troublesome items on it that I felt the need to question it and perhaps warn the authors of IWU away until you'd established more credentials and had a more proven track record.

    If you understood the culture of the people at IWU instead of simply doing drive-by spam messages advertising your services, if you actually participated in the group instead of putting up your ads and running away, you would understand this. No one likes to be spammed at. IWU has zero tolerance for spammers, and considering you don't participate in the community, you can hardly blame the folks at IWU for deleting and banning you from there. You had every appearance of spamming, especially since you do drive-by postings not only at IWU (twice now), but at other message boards around the internet.

    If that's your marketing plan, you sorely need a new one.

    Teresa is now horribly upset and understandably so - and for Jessica's information, Teresa was not making a "sales pitch" at you when she tried to respond to your assertion we are a scam publisher. She was trying to tell you her qualifications since you seem to question her being a veteran in the industry.
    Considering she didn't post said resume on your website, complete with total avoidance of mentioning any names of who is involved with your publisher, using key catch phrases of many typical vanity publishers, you can hardly blame me. As for the message she sent me, incidentally enough, it was another copy pasted advertisement of your services that was spammed to every single member who commented to the thread on IWU. Which was totally unnecessary.

    And I suppose, while she's all offended that I dare question her legitimacy as a publisher, I shouldn't be offended that she called I and several other IWU members "trolls" and insinuated that we were inhuman.

    I'm sorry she was upset. However, it's the nature of the writing business to have an examination of a new publisher conducted a la message boards like AW--something Ms. Kennedy should be aware of, considering her apparent extensive experience in traditional publishing. This is nothing new. And obviously, I wasn't the only one who raised my eyebrows a few times at your site, considering the other posters who commented to this thread with their own concerns.

    That said, I personally am taking this no further, and it would likely benefit you to do the same.
    Last edited by JessicaMeigs; 12-01-2011 at 07:35 AM.

  11. #11
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    Unimportant,

    First, I appreciate you pointing out some ambiguities in the website.

    We are a hybrid publisher that offers BOTH traditional and self publishing.

    We offer editing for a fee for authors who want to self publish wherever they desire.

    Placement with a literary agent is for those who want to be traditionally published - whether at a large or small house - and want to have a professional assist them. It has nothing to do with submissions for traditional publication at VGP LLC. Some places call them agent matchmaking services (SEE The Editorial Department's website) and you cannot do this without seeing the material you are trying to pitch. So no, it's not backwards.

    Cover Art design is for self publishing and the cost varies depending on what type of cover you want. You are working one-on-one with with a professional cover artist and he sets the price. Some covers are more time intensive to create.

    We offer self publishing AND traditional publishing. Editing for VGP, LLC's traditionally published books is NEVER done for a fee and neither is the cover art.

    Perhaps your suspicion would be alleviated if we did only self publishing which entails...editing for a fee; cover art for a fee; publicity packages for a fee; manuscript evaluation for a fee; and the like...or a package for both such as Createspace.

    The point is we want to offer both and we do. It is nothing more than that. It does not matter to us whether an author wants to shoot for a traditional contract with us or use our services piecemeal for submission to someone else.

    We wanted to be different and offer options. And the payment plans are for the self publishing services because some people cannot afford to pay everything up front. Again, that is to try to help the writer get what they want but be able to afford to do so.

    But if people want to presume and assume the worst, you are more than welcome to.

    But if you do so and then tell people publicly, "Oh this a fraudulent company" only because we offer both services; but we do exactly what we promise and have the credentials in the industry to back up the work, well, that can be actionable legally.

    As I said, we are a start-up and we are not perfect.

    We are doing the best we can - but as I am sure you realize there are a lot of publishers out there. I would love to have a perfect formula for requesting submissions, but I don't. I would love to have suggestions.

    Right now, most of the submissions we get are for self publishing and that is fine.

    But look at it from our side: we have started a business that we believe in. We did so in good faith and with the experience in the industry to do so. And we have several manuscripts in editing now that are slamming good that we will be publishing. Yet rather than a positive series of inquiries, or being approached in a positive way, we are immediately slammed as a fraud.

    I don't think that is useful. Now if people were to write to us or post here and say, "Hey, why do you do this?" or "What's with the self-publishing vs. traditional thing and why do you have both?" instead of immediately assuming it's for a fraudulent purpose, then you open a dialog which we are more than willing to have.

    I am more than willing to hear suggestions about the website - I welcome it. So thank you.

  12. #12
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    Jessica,

    I agree that Teresa and Andy's qualifications should be more detailed on the VGP LLC website.

    I would also love to know what you consider "spamming". I am not saying this sarcastically either.

    We are trying to work social media into our ad platform, but I don't want to be perceived as a spammer. I do announcements on my facebook page (personal page) and my personal twitter. But we haven't done a VGP LLC page yet. Teresa did not work for the publishers when the internet was used as extensively as it is today as a marketing tool.

    Teresa really did believe VGP LLC's goals were compatible with the group you're talking about. If I understand you correctly, then she should have joined and, as I wish to do here, engage in a dialog?

    Your latest post is most enlightening and I would like to open a dialog if you are willing.

  13. #13
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    Jessica,

    And as to the listing points, I've been an attorney for a long, long time. It is easier for me to do this. Sorry if you find it condescending. That was not intended.

    Also, Teresa is not serving as an agent and publisher. (see response to Unimportant).

    Lisa

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    Oh, dear.

    (First, as a general aside, can I just say how flip-cracker annoying it is when people insist on posting in something other than the default font? Because when I quote them I have to wade through all the coding for their special font or delete it all. It's a huge pain.)

    Quote Originally Posted by prsctrli View Post
    Hello, Cao and Jessica,

    This is Lisa Adams and I am Teresa Kennedy’s business partner at Village Green Press LLC. I am absolutely horrified by what I am reading here. As an attorney it also concerns me for a number of reasons.
    Horrified, really? Because people asked some questions and expressed the opinion that you're not a commercial press?

    And as an attorney you're concerned for a number of reasons...like what? I'm sorry, I know all the jokes, but I refuse to believe that all attorneys really do hate facts, honesty, and objectivity. But I can't see any other reason why an attorney would find anything said in this thread to be a concern, since none of it, afaik, violates any laws or constitutes libel or any kind of copyright violation. So why would any of it be especially troubling to you as an attorney?

    (I know you wouldn't be throwing that "attorney" bit in there as some sort of vague threat, would you? Others have tried that here, but I'm sure you're far too smart to involve yourself in such ridiculousness.)

    First, Village Green Press LLC is an LLC organized and in good standing in Nebraska. You can go to the Nebraska Secretary of State’s office and check.
    Great! No one here said it wasn't registered or in good standing with the state, but that's still nice to know.


    Second, what is of concern is that disparaging allegations were made that both SFWA’s “Absolute Write” and Preditors & Editors have warnings about our company and then publishing this information to the public at large. This was done by Jessica on Facebook at Indie Writers Unite and now, here.
    1. Absolute Write is not owned by SFWA. It is owned by MacAllister Stone, a private citizen and paragon of intelligence and loveliness. So this is not "SFWA's Absolute Write." That info is readily available.

    2. Absolute Write is not part of Preditors & Editors either. So if you have a problem with P&E, they're the people to speak to about that, not us.

    3. Apparently Jessica's comments on Facebook and Indie Writers Unite were somewhat inaccurate then, given that SFWA =/= AW and P&E =/= AW. The place to address those inaccuracies are the places where they appear; addressing them here does nothing except bring issues from other places into this forum, since she did not in fact make those comments here that I can see.

    For Jessica's edification, both Teresa and I use Twitter and Facebook to promote our publishing house and the books we publish. That that would cause alarm or be surprising or suspicious in any way is bizarre.
    No, there's a difference between promotion and spam. What Jessica has described--and what you've basically agreed was what you were doing on the IWU forum--was in fact spam. Spam is suspicious, because spam is unprofessional and, more importantly, is an indication that the owners or principals or whomever of the company in question do not know how to promote online or how to use social media. That's a concern in this day and age. A big one. That alone is reason to avoid a small press, IMO, even if there weren't so many other reasons, both specific to you and non-specific (in that pretty much any new press is to be avoided as far as I'm concerned, until two years or so have passed and they've proven themselves successful).


    Third, Victoria Strauss received an e-mail from me when we launched telling her exactly who we are and what we do. I did this because as an author who was taken advantage of by an unscrupulous publisher (Archebooks Publishing - I posted as prsctrli because, well, I used to be a prosecutor), she responded personally to my concerns and action was taken. I believed she would be happy to read of what had happened since then and to look at our site precisely to avoid this sort of public trashing not grounded in fact and also because I used this site a lot when I started out.
    And do you see Victoria Strauss posting negative things about you in this thread? Do you assume that every post is run by Victoria before it's approved or something? Why would you expect that having shown Victoria some documentation would preclude any other writer anywhere else online from having questions about your business?

    You are aware that all documentation submitted to Writer Beware (which *is* part of both SFWA and MWA) is confidential, right? That means Victoria doesn't pass it around. So again, I fail to see how you would think that a private discussion with Victoria would mean no one else would have questions.

    I find this comment to be rather offensive on Victoria's behalf, as the implication is that she has somehow acted unethically. As her friend I don't appreciate that.

    Also, this "public trashing" (which is not in fact anything like that) is grounded totally in fact; we're looking at words from your website, we're not making up stuff. And if you'd truly "used" this website as much as you claim, you'd know what happens in BR&BC and would have come in like a professional to answer our questions, instead of throwing around veiled insults and threats, tilting at windmills, and attempting to besmirch Victoria Strauss.

    Fourth, our first call for manuscripts was done by Teresa on Craig’s List before we launched. I understand that P&E gives “red flags” that might indicate that a business is a scam; and I am aware that posting on Craig’s List might indicate this. But it does not ALWAYS mean that the business is illegitimate.
    No. P&E gives "Not Recommended" ratings to any publisher or agent which charges a fee. You do. Therefore you get a "Not Recommended."

    No one here has called you a "scam." What we have said is that legit publishers don't need to solicit mss on Craigslist or spam forums. This is true. The only "publishers" I've ever seen do that have been either scams or amateur start-ups which failed within the first year. Neither is a good bet for a writer, and since this is a forum for writers, and looking after the interests of writers is what we do here, we tend to point that sort of thing out.

    If you dislike people saying your promotional efforts are unprofessional, find a way to make them more professional. We're allowed to have an opinion and to express it. And since we collectively have a lot of publishing experience--and recent publishing experience, at that--it might be a good idea to listen to us and learn from us rather than jumping in to argue. But of course that's your choice.

    Fifth, this company has both traditional and e-publishing capability through Lightning Source where we have a company account. That is how we physically generate books as do innumerable other publishing houses large and small.
    Okay.


    Sixth, as is the case with most publishers, Teresa is an “in-house” editor; and Andrew Earley is our in-house cover artist. If an author’s work is as ready as it would have to be for a “big house” to go to press or e-reader, then we would offer a traditional contract. If not we send the author a rejection letter.

    Seventh, in the rejection letter we do specify that we offer certain editorial and self publishing options if the author so desires.
    In other words, when you reject people you offer them paid editing and publishing services in the rejection letter. Do you honestly not see the conflict of interest there, or why publishing professionals would eye that askance, or why we would recommend a company which does that is to be avoided?

    Eighth, offering an option to polish a manuscript or help an author publish their own book is not "forcing” someone to use our editorial services. That idea is not only incorrect, it is patently absurd.
    It's also an idea no one but you has expressed here. No one else said anything about "forcing." Let's stick to rebutting claims actually made, shall we?


    Ninth, Teresa has the professional editorial experience with big houses both as an editor and author, to substantiate her ability to not only spot work that is commercially-viable; but also to edit work. Our cover artist, Andrew Earley, continues to do covers for the big houses in New York including DAW and others.
    And that's great! Can you see how some of the issues here could have been avoided had that information been available on the company's website?


    Tenth, we are a start-up. To have to now field negative and incorrect commentary about us is offensive and denigrates the idea that small indie houses are worth a damn. We started VGP LLC with the goal of finding writers whose voices might never be welcomed by big houses to publish traditionally.
    What commentary is incorrect here? I suppose you may see some of it as "negative." To us it's simply factual. You charge for editing and publication. That you don't charge all authors for it doesn't change the fact that you make money off authors, not readers, and are therefore at least in part a vanity press. An author looking to sign with a commercial press is not likely to want to sign with you.

    Speaking of commercial presses, who is your distributor? Do you offer standard bookstore discounts?


    Eleventh, Teresa Kennedy has authored or co-authored at least 30 books published through houses such as NAL, Simon & Schuster, St. Martin's Press, Rio Nuevo Press, Ballantine, Avon, and others; and through packagers such as Joostelffers Books, Bruck Books, Evans and many others. She worked as an Editor at Grosset & Dunlap, Putnam, Viking Press, Rio Nuevo, Ballantine, and others; as a Senior Editor at Grosset & Dunlap, Human Sciences Press; and acquisitions editor at such houses as Rio Nuevo Press, Human Sciences Press, and Berkely Press, and Dutton, among others.

    She has worked for agents such as Books Crossing Borders, Susan Ann Protter Literary Agency, Susan Herner Agency, and the Rights Unlimited Agency,
    She is more than willing to post her resume because this mess Jessica started has done damage that was thoughtless and unnecessary.
    Jessica did not "start" a "mess." Jessica asked legitimate questions after you (or another representative of your company) made her aware of its existence. Had Teresa posted her resume to begin with, perhaps Jessica would not have had to ask so many questions. Had no one spammed the writing forum of which Jessica is a member, she wouldn't have heard of you to ask questions. So who "started" this, exactly?

    But rest assured, had Jessica not asked the questions, someone else would have at some point. That's what happens here, see.


    I would appreciate a more positive approach to new publishers and not allowing members to jump on the “they must be a scam” bandwagon without adequate information or investigation of credentials.
    If that's what you'd like, you can always start your own forum. AW will stick with the way we've always run, thanks (and again, no one called you a scam).

    And I point out again, we would have had adequate information and the ability to better judge credentials had the names of any of the principals involved in the company or any of their professional qualifications been posted on the company's website. Jessica even checked WHOIS. What else was she supposed to do? Don't berate people for not doing research when you provided them with no information at all to go on.


    Teresa is now horribly upset and understandably so - and for Jessica's information, Teresa was not making a "sales pitch" at you when she tried to respond to your assertion we are a scam publisher. She was trying to tell you her qualifications since you seem to question her being a veteran in the industry.
    I'm genuinely sorry Teresa is upset. But I'm glad she now realizes how important it is to list her credentials on the website, so as to avoid such misunderstandings in future.

    Of course Jessica--and others--questioned her claims to be an industry pro. There was no proof. And given the questionable nature of a few things on the site--a few of the services the company offers--I can't really blame her for questioning it.

    Which services, you ask? Well, aside from the vanity press etc., I was thinking specifically of this one:

    Quote Originally Posted by prsctrli View Post
    [FONT=&quot]

    Placement with a literary agent is for those who want to be traditionally published - whether at a large or small house - and want to have a professional assist them. It has nothing to do with submissions for traditional publication at VGP LLC. Some places call them agent matchmaking services (SEE The Editorial Department's website) and you cannot do this without seeing the material you are trying to pitch. So no, it's not backwards.

    Ah...the "Literary Agent Matchmaker." So unnecessary it's not even funny. I have a whole post about one of these "matchmakers" and exactly why this "service" is a huge waste of money and time right here, from the last time a self-styled "matchmaker" tried to solicit a bunch of innocent writers into giving her money for something they could do themselves for free with probably superior results.

    That alone is enough to make me seriously question the credentials of any of the company's employees or principals, sorry. I know Teresa has them...how does she feel about that service?
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  15. #15
    Wilde about Oscar aliceshortcake's Avatar
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    Fourth, our first call for manuscripts was done by Teresa on Craig’s List before we launched. I understand that P&E gives “red flags” that might indicate that a business is a scam; and I am aware that posting on Craig’s List might indicate this. But it does not ALWAYS mean that the business is illegitimate.
    I'm astounded that anyone with so much experience in the publishing industry would advertise for manuscripts through Craigslist. This alone would put me off Village Green Press.

  16. #16
    Tired and Disillusioned Momento Mori's Avatar
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    prsctrli:
    This is Lisa Adams and I am Teresa Kennedy’s business partner at Village Green Press LLC. I am absolutely horrified by what I am reading here. As an attorney it also concerns me for a number of reasons.
    As an attorney myself, I'm fascinated by your horror at people asking legitimate questions about your business activities.

    prsctrli:
    First, Village Green Press LLC is an LLC organized and in good standing in Nebraska. You can go to the Nebraska Secretary of State’s office and check.
    That's good to know but as an attorney, you're aware that it's not actually difficult to set up a legitimate company. People do it all the time and the fact that you have an incorporated entity, though a sensible and legitimate legal move, does not by itself give your business any additional credibility as either a publisher or an agent.

    In any event, no one on this board suggested that Village Green Press was not duly incorporated, so your provision of this information, while interesting, is not really pertinent to the discussion at hand.

    prsctrli:
    Second, what is of concern is that disparaging allegations were made that both SFWA’s “Absolute Write” and Preditors & Editors have warnings about our company and then publishing this information to the public at large. This was done by Jessica on Facebook at Indie Writers Unite and now, here.
    As an attorney, you should be aware of the need to get your facts straight. Absolute Write is not connected with or owned by SFWA. Nor does the SFWA have anything to do with P&A. Both of AW and P&E are privately run sites.

    Had you or your business partner decided to do a little research before your post here, you'd realise that the purpose of AW and P&E is to give people a means to find out if a particular agent or publisher is worth sending a manuscript to. Although both sites identify known (and demonstrable) scam outfits, they also identify those publishers/agents that are legitimate but simply not worth submitting to (usually because they have no real track record of sales) and give submissions information on well-established and well-regarded publishers/agents to enable people to work out how to tailor their queries.

    prsctrli:
    For Jessica's edification, both Teresa and I use Twitter and Facebook to promote our publishing house and the books we publish. That that would cause alarm or be surprising or suspicious in any way is bizarre.
    For your edification, publishers/agents who tout for authors on Twitter and Facebook are usually publishers that make the majority of their money from those authors, not from selling books.

    The basic principle espoused here on AW is that money should always flow to the author, i.e. authors should ideally not pay for services up front but if they do choose to do so, then they should be given as much information as possible to determine whether they will make that money back.

    In the case of a publisher, that means seeing whether the publisher is capable of making the sales necessary to make back that investment (in the case of self-publishing). In the case of other services such as editing or agenting - it means having the demonstrable skills or contacts necessary to make the same worthwhile. In both these cases, there are no details about your contacts or editors to indicate whether those services would be worth obtaining.

    prsctrli:
    Third, Victoria Strauss received an e-mail from me when we launched telling her exactly who we are and what we do. I did this because as an author who was taken advantage of by an unscrupulous publisher (Archebooks Publishing - I posted as prsctrli because, well, I used to be a prosecutor), she responded personally to my concerns and action was taken. I believed she would be happy to read of what had happened since then and to look at our site precisely to avoid this sort of public trashing not grounded in fact and also because I used this site a lot when I started out.
    It's good that you contacted Victoria Strauss and I applaud you for taking her advice. However the fact that you have previously been taken by an unscrupulous publisher raises questions as to whether you actually know what you're doing to justify taking money or intellectual property rights from other authors.

    It also makes me doubly question where your company got the "30 years in the business" that Village Green uses to offer an agent link services.

    prsctrli:
    Fourth, our first call for manuscripts was done by Teresa on Craig’s List before we launched. I understand that P&E gives “red flags” that might indicate that a business is a scam; and I am aware that posting on Craig’s List might indicate this. But it does not ALWAYS mean that the business is illegitimate.
    No, you're right. Posting on Craig's List is not an automatic sign that a business is a scam. It does usually indicate that a business doesn't really know what it's doing though and if nothing else, it makes the business look distinctly amateurish IMO.

    prsctrli:
    Fifth, this company has both traditional and e-publishing capability through Lightning Source where we have a company account. That is how we physically generate books as do innumerable other publishing houses large and small.
    By "traditional" I assume you mean "print publishing". I've seen "traditional publishing" used as a synonym for commercial publishing, but never print publishing before.

    Also, a Lightning Source account is a basic step but unless you're doing print runs and have deals in place with bricks and mortar stores and large electronic markets like Amazon, I don't see how you're going to have the distribution in place to sell in bulk.

    prsctrli:
    Sixth, as is the case with most publishers, Teresa is an “in-house” editor; and Andrew Earley is our in-house cover artist. If an author’s work is as ready as it would have to be for a “big house” to go to press or e-reader, then we would offer a traditional contract. If not we send the author a rejection letter.
    Even in the case of a "big house" like Penguin, manuscripts go through an editing process. They don't just get sent raw for printing. When a "big house" buys a manuscript, it knows that a degree of work will be required. The offer of an advance however is not based on how polished the manuscript is but on how many copies the publisher thinks it can sell.

    prsctrli:
    Seventh, in the rejection letter we do specify that we offer certain editorial and self publishing options if the author so desires.
    You understand how this looks though, don't you? Because it leaves your company open to suggestion that it uses bait and switch, i.e. invites people to submit for an advance paying contract, then says it's not good enough but instead the author can pay for another service? In addition to being a potential conflict of interest (a concept which, as an attorney, you should be familiar with), it also leaves your company open to the suggestion that it's looking to make money from authors rather than with authors.

    prsctrli:
    Eighth, offering an option to polish a manuscript or help an author publish their own book is not "forcing” someone to use our editorial services. That idea is not only incorrect, it is patently absurd.
    It's not patently absurd precisely because of the fact that your company has created a conflict of interest. It is perfectly open for an author to interpret your company's rejection letter as a suggestion that your company will publish them if they go through the editing or paid publishing offer.

    prsctrli:
    Ninth, Teresa has the professional editorial experience with big houses both as an editor and author, to substantiate her ability to not only spot work that is commercially-viable; but also to edit work. Our cover artist, Andrew Earley, continues to do covers for the big houses in New York including DAW and others.
    Cool - it's good to know this experience exists because it goes to credibility. I also note your (eventual) revelation of Teresa's contacts and editorial experience:

    prsctrli:
    Eleventh, Teresa Kennedy has authored or co-authored at least 30 books published through houses such as NAL, Simon & Schuster, St. Martin's Press, Rio Nuevo Press, Ballantine, Avon, and others; and through packagers such as Joostelffers Books, Bruck Books, Evans and many others. She worked as an Editor at Grosset & Dunlap, Putnam, Viking Press, Rio Nuevo, Ballantine, and others; as a Senior Editor at Grosset & Dunlap, Human Sciences Press; and acquisitions editor at such houses as Rio Nuevo Press, Human Sciences Press, and Berkely Press, and Dutton, among others.
    This is all information that you should be putting on your website because as a start-up, you want to show that you've got the credentials to do what you're promising.

    prsctrli:
    Tenth, we are a start-up. To have to now field negative and incorrect commentary about us is offensive and denigrates the idea that small indie houses are worth a damn. We started VGP LLC with the goal of finding writers whose voices might never be welcomed by big houses to publish traditionally.
    Yes, you are a start up. As a start-up, you should therefore be aware that you need to prove your credibility in the field that you're entering and you should be prepared to take questions about your activities. If you can't do that, then I'd respectfully suggest that you're in the wrong business.

    I understand that you might not like to be criticised and FWIW I believe you have good intentions, but you should also be aware that coming in heavy and shouting the odds to legitimate questions makes you look bad. It makes your company look like one that can't handle criticism. I'm not sure that's the impression you want to give.

    prsctrli:
    She is more than willing to post her resume because this mess Jessica started has done damage that was thoughtless and unnecessary.
    Do you mean the mess that Jessica created by bringing your company to this board's attention and asking legitimate questions as to whether your company is worth going with and pointing out the lack of supporting information on your company's website? Or are you talking about the mess that you created with your snotty attitude, insinuated threats and blatant failure to use normal industry terms?

    prsctrli:
    I would appreciate a more positive approach to new publishers and not allowing members to jump on the “they must be a scam” bandwagon without adequate information or investigation of credentials.
    No one said you were a scam. I'm not convinced that you're a good idea for authors, but I don't think you're a scam. Ironically, it's because we were investigating your credentials and trying to find more information that the post got made and people commented on it.

    AW shows plenty of support for new publishers, but it doesn't exist as a cheerleader. If you hang out on the boards, you'll see there are plenty of small publishers here where the owners have come and responded to queries in an open and upfront way, without having hissy fits at people asking the questions. As a corporate communication strategy, it's more effective than the one you've chosen to adopt.

    prsctrli:
    Teresa is now horribly upset and understandably so - and for Jessica's information, Teresa was not making a "sales pitch" at you when she tried to respond to your assertion we are a scam publisher. She was trying to tell you her qualifications since you seem to question her being a veteran in the industry.
    It's a shame that Teresa is upset. It's also a shame that Village Green didn't put those credentials up on its website because that would remove one obvious question, wouldn't it?

    prsctrli:
    We are a hybrid publisher that offers BOTH traditional and self publishing.
    Okay, so how many "traditional", i.e. advance paying contracts do you offer? What's the proportion of advance paying contracts to self-publishing contracts? (I don't need precise figures, I'd be happy with percentages of the whole).

    You should be aware that many "hybrid" publishers end up making their money from selling publishing services to authors - services that the authors rarely make back the cost for with sales of their book. That's why they're generally regarded with skepticism on these boards.

    prsctrli:
    Placement with a literary agent is for those who want to be traditionally published - whether at a large or small house - and want to have a professional assist them. It has nothing to do with submissions for traditional publication at VGP LLC. Some places call them agent matchmaking services (SEE The Editorial Department's website) and you cannot do this without seeing the material you are trying to pitch. So no, it's not backwards.
    Okay, so how many manuscripts have you placed with agents?

    The problem I have with this "service" is that I don't see where the value is for an author. Authors are perfectly capable of doing their own research on agents and doing a submission for them. I don't see what paying your company does to get them closer to the goal.

    prsctrli:
    Perhaps your suspicion would be alleviated if we did only self publishing which entails...editing for a fee; cover art for a fee; publicity packages for a fee; manuscript evaluation for a fee; and the like...or a package for both such as Createspace.

    The point is we want to offer both and we do. It is nothing more than that. It does not matter to us whether an author wants to shoot for a traditional contract with us or use our services piecemeal for submission to someone else.
    Actually the point is whether either of your services represents good value for an author. It would be good to know what kind of sales your books achieve and whether authors who pay for services make that back in royalties.

    prsctrli:
    But if people want to presume and assume the worst, you are more than welcome to.
    You really need to go and take a course in effective corporate communications because lady, you are doing your company no favours at all.

    prsctrli:
    But if you do so and then tell people publicly, "Oh this a fraudulent company" only because we offer both services; but we do exactly what we promise and have the credentials in the industry to back up the work, well, that can be actionable legally.
    I agree that if we told people yours was a fraudulent company then you'd be able to take legal recourse. The tiny problem with that is that no one has actually done so here. However, the more you shout and wave your tiny legal fists of fury at us, the more I think your company doesn't represent a good bet for authors and the more I would counsel a person to send their hard written manuscript to companies that operate on a more professional, less emotional basis.

    prsctrli:
    Right now, most of the submissions we get are for self publishing and that is fine.
    I can well see why that is fine. People paying you to produce their books and then taking the risk of sales is always going to be better than you paying out for manuscripts and then you taking the risk of sales.

    prsctrli:
    But look at it from our side: we have started a business that we believe in. We did so in good faith and with the experience in the industry to do so. And we have several manuscripts in editing now that are slamming good that we will be publishing. Yet rather than a positive series of inquiries, or being approached in a positive way, we are immediately slammed as a fraud.
    No one has said you're a fraud. You're the only one using that word on this board.

    In fact, we are making inquiries. You're responding to them (and doing so in an unprofessional way).

    The fact that you're a start-up (regardless of whether you're acting in good faith) doesn't entitle you to special treatment or kid gloves.

    prsctrli:
    I don't think that is useful. Now if people were to write to us or post here and say, "Hey, why do you do this?" or "What's with the self-publishing vs. traditional thing and why do you have both?" instead of immediately assuming it's for a fraudulent purpose, then you open a dialog which we are more than willing to have.
    This is a public board. It's for sharing questions, information and opinions. Yes, people can ask you questions direct, or you can answer questions here in the open and for the public record.

    No one has a duty or obligation to contact you direct. This is a board for writers to share information and ask questions. Those nasty little accusations of fraud that you keep talking about don't exist here and it would serve you better not to accuse of saying such things.

    MM

  17. #17
    Writer Beware Goddess Absolute Sage victoriastrauss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prsctrli View Post
    Second, what is of concern is that disparaging allegations were made that both SFWA’s “Absolute Write” and Preditors & Editors have warnings about our company and then publishing this information to the public at large. This was done by Jessica on Facebook at Indie Writers Unite and now, here.

    SFWA isn't associated with either Absolute Write or Preditors & Editors. They are entirely separate organizations.
    Third, Victoria Strauss received an e-mail from me when we launched telling her exactly who we are and what we do. I did this because as an author who was taken advantage of by an unscrupulous publisher (Archebooks Publishing - I posted as prsctrli because, well, I used to be a prosecutor), she responded personally to my concerns and action was taken. I believed she would be happy to read of what had happened since then and to look at our site precisely to avoid this sort of public trashing not grounded in fact and also because I used this site a lot when I started out.
    I did receive this email, and I did look at your site (at the time, I don't believe the Agent Link service existed, or I might have been more concerned). I filed it away as another of the many self-publishing services out there--not a red-flag enterprise, in particular, but offering services that writers might be able to obtain more cost-effectively with some comparison shopping (I always suggest comparison shopping to any writer who is considering paying for a publishing service), and also a bit of a question mark simply in its newness. There's such an enormous attrition rate among new publishers and publishing services; writers really are wise to adopt a wait-and-see approach until the company has been putting out books for at least a year, and has demonstrated some stability (this also makes it possible to evaluate things like design, quality, and marketing, and gives time for complaints, if any, to surface).

    I did appreciate receiving the information about Village Green. But I don't quite see how that was supposed to prevent other people from commenting on it.

    I have to say that I'm always concerned when a publisher offers both traditional publishing and self-publishing. These are are so different that I think their co-existence poses an automatic conflict of interest--not just for authors, who may not know when they submit what sort of offer they're going to get, or who may be fundamentally confused about what kind of publisher they're approaching--but for the publisher, which has to balance the competing demands and techniques of two different business models.

    I also consider agent referral programs to be something of a red flag, no matter how well-intentioned they are. Agents are already the middlemen of the commercial publishing world; writers absolutely don't need another layer of middleman-ship, especially if they have to pay for it. Plus, where the agents involved aren't named, writers have no guarantee that the referrals are worthwhile. There has recently been a major discussion of this exact kind of program in connection with the Brit Writers' Awards; Jane Smith offers a good summary of why it's a problem.

    - Victoria

  18. #18
    but appreciated anyway... Unimportant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prsctrli View Post
    Placement with a literary agent is for those who want to be traditionally published - whether at a large or small house - and want to have a professional assist them.

    Do you guarantee that those who pay you a fee will get accepted by an AAR agent? If not, what are writers getting for the fee they pay you?

    Quote Originally Posted by prsctrli View Post
    Perhaps your suspicion would be alleviated if we did only self publishing which entails...editing for a fee; cover art for a fee; publicity packages for a fee; manuscript evaluation for a fee; and the like...or a package for both such as Createspace.

    Well, yes, it would. Or, at least, if your website made it very clear that you are in fact two different companies -- a trade publisher and a services-for-self-publisher provider -- and that there was no crossover between the two. Stating that an author who pays for editorial services cannot have their ms considered for the trade publisher division would be helpful.

    Quote Originally Posted by prsctrli View Post
    But if people want to presume and assume the worst, you are more than welcome to.

    We are reading the information on the website. A publisher should know that if readers misinterpret the writer's meaning, then the writer has failed to communicate their intentions properly. It's not the readers' fault.

    Quote Originally Posted by prsctrli View Post
    But if you do so and then tell people publicly, "Oh this a fraudulent company" only because we offer both services; but we do exactly what we promise and have the credentials in the industry to back up the work, well, that can be actionable legally.

    OMG! I am shaking in terror! I read your website and came away with the perception that you are either ignorant amateurs or disingenous scammers, and shared that opinion here on AW. And now I might be sued and go to prison for the rest of my life where I will be someone's bitch and be forced to perform unnatural sex acts! Noooooooo!!!!!!! Save me, MacAllister!!!!!! Furthermore, I stole some of those redundant exclamation points from your website and will now probably be extradited for theft, too. Hell, I might as well just go kill myself now and get it over with.

    Or maybe I'll, oh, I dunno, go write some stories and submit them to a real publisher. Or something.

  19. #19
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    For the record, since this seems to keep coming up, I never once called Village Green Press a "scam" or "scammers." When Theresa Kennedy posted an advertisement to the Facebook group in question, the owner asked for her to explain who she was and what she would do for people, and at the same time, I replied to the owner telling her they were a small press publisher that felt the need to spam all over the place to get their message out. The group, once again, has a very low-tolerance for spam messages and so she was booted.

    It was very much a drive-by advertisement from a non-active member, and it wasn't appreciated.

    I also never once even mentioned AW or P&E a single time in the thread. So I'm honestly not sure where she gets the statements that I equated SFWA with AW or P&E.

    I still have the thread in my email (for that matter, every post she's made at IWU recently, thanks to not having dumped my trash in ages), and they are as follows:

    Teresa Kennedy posted in Indie Writers Unite!

    Teresa Kennedy 5:39pm Nov 1
    http://villagegreenpressllc.blogspot...1_archive.html
    Teresa Kennedy posted in Indie Writers Unite!

    Teresa Kennedy 1:51pm Nov 8
    New blog post on another writing mystery term. http://villagegreenpressllc.blogspot.com/
    Which, honestly, contained some good information for people to start off with, and she could have used this to lead into active participation in the group, but she neglected to do so in favor of posting things like this:

    Teresa Kennedy posted in Indie Writers Unite!

    Teresa Kennedy 3:25pm Nov 15
    I'm looking for a few good manuscripts. http://villagegreenpressLLC.com/. We're a boutique publisher offering a full range of services both for self-pubbers and those who wish to pursue more traditional publishing outlets.
    That was the post that sparked my need to post for more information, as we're a tight community at IWU and generally protect each other from anything questionable. I'd never heard of VGP and wanted to know more information for the sake of those at IWU.

    And, of course, the post that sparked this particular post:

    Teresa Kennedy posted in Indie Writers Unite!

    Teresa Kennedy 4:42pm Nov 30
    Check out our new website updates, Testimonials and new blog post under Village Gossip!
    http://www.villagegreenpressLLC.com/
    And this is about as far as her participation in IWU went. Nothing but messages advertising her services. You can, I'm sure, understand why we were wary to begin with.
    Last edited by JessicaMeigs; 12-02-2011 at 04:45 AM.

  20. #20
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    Quote Originally Posted by prsctrli View Post
    Jessica,

    I agree that Teresa and Andy's qualifications should be more detailed on the VGP LLC website.
    Or detailed at all. They're largely absent, other than the previously quoted, "Run by industry veterans" statement.

    I would also love to know what you consider "spamming". I am not saying this sarcastically either.

    spamming (ˈspæmɪŋ)
    — n
    the sending of multiple unsolicited e-mails or text messages, usually for marketing purposes

    And this is, by all appearances, all that VGP has done in IWU for the past month's postings.

    We are trying to work social media into our ad platform, but I don't want to be perceived as a spammer.
    Then perhaps you should actually take the time to understand social media before you utilize it as a marketing platform. There's a reason a lot of companies hire social media specialists specifically for that.

    Teresa really did believe VGP LLC's goals were compatible with the group you're talking about. If I understand you correctly, then she should have joined and, as I wish to do here, engage in a dialog?
    Well yes. This is what we do here on planet Earth. We socialize, which is the very essence of social media. You guys would have likely gotten a warm reception if you'd joined, participated for a while, gotten to know people and their works, gotten a feel for how the group operates and everything, and made everyone get a feel for the type of people you are before starting to throw around advertisements. That's the big key to leveraging social media as a marketing tool: you have to actually participate, not just throw up advertisements.

    Walking into a bar and shouting at the top of your lungs, "I AM A PUBLISHER. CHECK OUT MY WEBSITE!" will likely garner you some fairly dirty looks. The same applies to any community-style website you go on.

  21. #21
    but appreciated anyway... Unimportant's Avatar
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    Jessica--

    I reckon that plebes like you and me think scam, spam, and slam mean different things, but that's because we're misundereducated non-attorney types. What do we know?

    Here -- I'll loan ya this in case ya need it:

  22. #22
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unimportant View Post
    Jessica--

    I reckon that plebes like you and me think scam, spam, and slam mean different things, but that's because we're misundereducated non-attorney types. What do we know?

    Here -- I'll loan ya this in case ya need it:
    *rightclicksave* Why, thank you. I'm sure, with my big mouth, that'll come in handy one day. :P

    Who knew my forays into the forums (I've been a lurker for AGES) would start all this? lmao

  23. #23
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    To all who commented,

    Thank you. I really do appreciate the participation and positive direction it took. Your feedback on both the VGP website and this thread is very helpful.


    MMORI,
    I would love to acknowledge waving my "tiny legal fists" about, but at 5'10" that is kind of impossible. And I am non-violent, so really, I don't do that although I appreciate the visual.

    Jessica,

    Thanks for all the feedback about IWU - the first I heard of it was when Teresa called to tell me about what had happened.



    Unimportant,


    Snarky but humorous.


    Victoria,

    Hello again and good to read what you had to say. When I sent you the e-mail, it was only to see if you could look at the site and let me know if you saw any red flags that might turn authors away. When I did not hear anything back, I just figured you were too busy.

    I absolutely agree that there is a vast universe of publishers out there. And effectively using the internet to attract authors to our site is essential. The key is figuring out how to do this.


    Consequently, it is very easy as an author to search for agents and publishers. It is not so easy as a publisher to find authors. I see areas where our website can use improvement and clarification; likewise with communicating with authors from the get-go.

    I wish you all the best.

    Teresa wanted me to post this:

    I have deliberately stayed away from this discussion because I think it's counterproductive for anyone to try and prove a negative, i.e., "I am not a crook."

    I am a hardworking professional whose publishing track record is readily available for anyone who cares to look. My history is published on the Village Green blog for those who care to read it; and is further discussed in the link to my author interview, also on the website. A list of my published titles is available on amazon.com

    I also think it's counterproductive for a publisher to make too much of their own history. I am not the star here--my authors are.

    And it's equally interesting to me that for all this discussion, not one person has mentioned the growing list of testimonials on the website either.

    My function is to help get authors happily published, whatever their chosen venue and at whatever the stage of the process they come to me.

    Regrettably, I have to charge for my editorial services, but most professionals do. It's also unfortunate that the witch-hunting mentality seems to have overtaken forums such as these.

    Funny that a publisher must somehow provide credentials, yet many writers don't seem to feel they need any qualifications at all to become authors. I would however, like to remind you that EVERY reputable publisher has very definite standards for the writers they choose to publish.

  24. #24
    but appreciated anyway... Unimportant's Avatar
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    The testimonials I've seen on the site have been "Wow, great editing, I learned a lot and my manscript is much improved." That's nice. But what'll impress me is "Wow, great editing, with my improved manuscript I was able to secure representation with an AAR agent and/or got a contract offer from a Big 6 publisher."

    If you're a small press looking for authors, my advice would be to specialise in a niche or genre. "We're looking for fiction and non fiction books in many categories" is neither helpful nor confidence-inspiring. Small presses succeed because they have editorial/marketing experience in a particular genre. It's unlikely that the Village Green editor would be a top-notch expert in romance and fantasy and science fiction and mystery and literary and thriller and erotica fiction, and would know what's cliched and what's hot and what's expected and what's de rigeur in the genre.

  25. #25
    A faithful friend & a good library AphraB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prsctrli View Post
    Funny that a publisher must somehow provide credentials, yet many writers don't seem to feel they need any qualifications at all to become authors. I would however, like to remind you that EVERY reputable publisher has very definite standards for the writers they choose to publish.
    Standards for fiction: The ability to write well and produce books that people will want to read. Also to follow the agent's/publisher's instructions for submissions.
    Qualification for non-fiction: To be an expert or to know something about the topic as well as the ability to write well and produce books that people will want to read. Also to follow etc.

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