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Thread: New Libri Press

  1. #1
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    It's been about a month and I haven't heard back from Russel & Volkening. Hopefully, I'll hear something soon.

    I did have an offer to publish from New Libri Press. Does anyone know anything about them? They are a new press and are coming out with their first three book by the end of the month. Next year they plan on putting out twenty books or so.

    They have been professional as well as helpful. The individual I am working with is the co-founder of the press. He has a lot of experience in computer programming and management and is working on a MFA.

    They have two types of publishin: one that is in the vain of traditional publishing, and the second, which they offer to books that they are unsure about. This is where they share costs with the author.

    They offered to publish my book using the first method--the traditional press, which means they cover all costs, help market and get reviews, and only make money when I do.

    I am seriously considering their offer. Any advice?

  2. #2
    Mostly Harmless SuperModerator CaoPaux's Avatar
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    Copied from agency thread.

    Adding link: http://www.newlibri.com/
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  3. #3
    Hapless Virago IceCreamEmpress's Avatar
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    I think that anyone considering publishing their work with a new small press should ask what their distribution strategies are (hint: just working with Baker and Taylor and Ingram are not enough to actively get books on shelves) and what their marketing and promotion plans are.

    Other useful aspects of due diligence are finding out what the previous publishing experience of the relevant principals may be, as well as what the business's short- and long-term strategic goals consist of.

    I have to say that I am not at all inspired to confidence by their website, which is full of vague flummery about The Future of Publishing, and notably short on actual details (like the previous experience of the principals).
    Last edited by IceCreamEmpress; 10-19-2011 at 04:56 AM.


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  4. #4
    Tired and Disillusioned Momento Mori's Avatar
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    There are a number of things on the website that concern me:

    New Libri Press Website:
    New Libri Press is a small independent press dedicated to publishing new authors and independent authors in both eBook and traditional formats.
    There are plenty of good presses out there that are doing well with ebooks, but physical books remain a tough market given distribution issues. Unless there's evidence that New Libri can actually get books into stores (which is different from just making them available to order in stores), I wouldn't want to sign away print rights - and to be fair, I'd be hesitant about signing away electronic rights unless I was certain about how they were going to promote and distribute my book electronically.

    New Libri Press Website:
    We are keeping our initial call for manuscripts broad, and will consider genre fiction, literary fiction, and non-fiction. At this time we are only excluding romance and religious popular fiction.
    The fact that they are open to pretty much anything doesn't fill me with confidence. New presses generally do better by focusing on particular markets and establishing their reputation in the same before branching out. By being open to pretty much anything I'd be concerned that they won't have specific marketing and distribution strategies in mind.

    New Libri Press Website:
    One is the very traditional publishing model where we accept your manuscript and publish it completely on our dollar, the other is a shared risk model, where some of the upfront costs are shared by the author in return for a larger percentage of profits.
    Under commercial publishing, authors are paid an upfront advance for their work with the publisher taking a risk on making the sales. Here, New Libri Press only seems to be either taking money direct from authors or sharing the risk of sales.

    New Libri Press Website:
    New Libri is the publisher resembling the traditional author publisher relationship. There is no fee to the author. We are very selective in this category--as are all publishers. We encourage you to submit to this model, but warn you ahead of time on the limited number of titles per year a small publisher can do. We may encourage great authors, when we are unsure of the market, to examine Model Two.
    As said, the "resemblance" between this and commercial publishing is misleading. Publishers who offer a vanity/co-publishing model in addition to "traditional" publishing usually say that they're selective in who they offer "traditional" publishing to, but you've only got their word that they are and it suggests that they're much less fussy about who they take under their vanity/co-publishing model. If I was considering this press, I'd be concerned about who my work will be released next to and if you're book is from a publisher who is putting out vanity slush, then it doesn't generally reflect well on your own book.

    New Libri Press Website:
    We simply know that we don't always get it right in predicting the market and want to increase the pool of new authors that have a chance to break into the marketplace.
    It's not so much predicting the market as having a good idea as to what will sell or not. If you're charging your authors to publish, then you don't anticipate sales being made in significant numbers to earn you a profit and why should an author subsidise that when they can self-publish for free and keep everything they earn?

    New Libri Press Website:
    Author and New Libri share costs of publishing. Author gains larger percentage of profit. In all other ways this resembles Model One. We are quite selective in the group, but more willing to take a chance on something that we feel is less viable, or that we simply do not understand the market well enough.
    If you don't understand the market, then you shouldn't be releasing into it period. If you don't think that something is economically viable, then you shouldn't be releasing it period.

    It's all very well saying that you're "selective" in who to offer co-publishing to, but all too often small presses find that selectiveness easing off when there are cash flow problems.

    Also as an author you need to think of it this way - if you're paying up front and only getting a percentage of the profit - how many books do you need to sell to earn that up front cost back?

    New Libri Press Website:
    Typically, these upfront publication, editing, and marketing costs run us ten thousand dollars per title. We generally ask for a shared risk model that is 50% or less of these costs and generally the author's percentage of profits is much higher.
    I'd like to see the breakdown of how it's $10k per title (not saying that it's not but I'd like to see the justification). So authors will typically be asked to pay $5k up front for an unspecified "higher percentage of profits" without any detail on how those profits are calculated. Doesn't sound like good value to me.

    For $5k you could probably hire your own editor and cover artist, slap it up on Amazon (where you'd have control over the price) and keep most of the profits for yourself (less Amazon's share).

    New Libri Press Website:
    You may want to consider self-publishing, but we do encourage you to consider the full costs of self-publishing and the read some of the articles on the value of a publisher-editor relationship with the author.
    That would be a fair comment if there was any information on the New Libris website about who its editors are and what their experience is. Unfortunately there isn't. As such, if an author self-publishes and chooses to seek an editor they can at least get information on their credentials and negotiate the price before hand.

    New Libri Press Website:
    Both of our models have one thing in common: collaboration. This means hands on editing and encouragement of collaboration between our authors. It means we insist on the author working with us on everything from artwork to marketing.
    I'd want to know what's meant by "collaboration". If I'm being asked to pay $5k up front, I don't want to be doing almost everything myself - particularly when it comes to artwork and marketing. I want to write books and I want to earn money from those books. Statements like this always give me the heebies because it suggests to me that the publisher doesn't know what it's doing either.

    New Libri Press Website:
    Q: Why should I use you versus going to a large publisher?
    A: In general, you should approach us only if you are satisfied that your option of going to a large publisher has been explored. If you are a new, or unknown author, we may be a better alternative. The model of profit sharing is different. Also, as a small publisher the relationship is different. It is more of a partnership. Over 300,000 new books are released each year in the traditional publishing world, with a staggering 3 million new titles in the non-traditional world. This means that there is a new title for every 100 people in the United States. If book buying was evenly distributed, you would sell 100 copies of your book!
    The attention a large publisher pays to each of these varies. In general, large publishers like to bet on sure things. Since we form a partnership and often share the risk, we can make different decisions versus the large publisher.
    I agree that you shouldn't look at New Libri until you've really run through all your other options.

    The statistics on the number of new books released each year is misleading because commonly, it captures everything that's released with an ISBN (which can include pamphlets). In practice though, most vanity published books do only sell up to 100 copies. Now, if you've paid $5k up front and you only sell 100 copies, you're probably not going to make your costs back. Unless you've got money to throw away, it's therefore not worth your while.

    New Libri Press Website:
    With the changing landscape of publishing and book consumption, the old communities that both authors and readers could depend on are disappearing. Yet, there is an opportunity for new community. Third places facilitate and broaden creative interaction. Our mission is not to "just" be another publishing company, but a third place, a new kind of publisher for new books: New Libri.
    I honestly don't understand what this means, let alone how New Libri thinks that it's creating some kind of third alternative (which, as a Brit, brings to mind a grinning Tony Blair and look how well that turned out).

    New Libri Press Website:
    Our early adopters naturally will get some bonus time and breaks.
    Huh? As a publisher, I'd want to know when final versions of books are being delivered as it goes to my release schedule.

    New Libri Press Website:
    Our model is different. We ARE a publisher and have skin in the game. We have a model that through shared risk will allow more authors an alternative to self-publishing.
    No, it's not different. There are plenty of vanity/co-publishers/investment publishers out there and they all generally represent bad value for an author.

    New Libri Press Website:
    The old bible of getting published is still worthy: Writer's Market.
    We are too new and perhaps too hybrid, to be listed in the current hard copy edition. There is a big emphasis on agents in Writer's Market. We recommend double checking any information there with a search of the market, or agent's, website as Writer's Market does age and there have been some complaints that the website is harder to use than the book. (Trial available, but not free)
    Or maybe you just didn't get an application/fee in to Writer's Market in time to be listed there.

    New Libri Press Website:
    As an author you may wonder if you should submit to us, versus a more established publishing house. We encourage you to do both--submit to us and submit to others. All of us at New Libri are, and have been, authors (and editors and entrepreneurs); we know how hard it is to break in
    There's no information on New Libri's editorial or entrepreneur experience and unless the people behind New Libri have successfully self-published themselves, nothing to suggest they know how the publishing industry works.

    New Libri Press Website: (Comments in Bold Capitals are mine)
    Why an independent, small, new, press is advantageous:
    • We deal with new authors. SO DO COMMERCIAL PUBLISHERS.
    • We are more hands on than large houses. THIS DEPENDS ON YOUR DEFINITION OF "HANDS ON". IF IT MEANS AUTHORS GOING OUT THERE AND DOING MOST OF THE MARKETING, SELLING AND DISTRIBUTION THEMSELVES, THEN IT IS NOT A GOOD THING.
    • Our eBook process is not generic conversion. SO? IN COMMERCIAL PUBLISHERS THE EBOOK WILL BE THE SAME AS THE PRINTED BOOK.
    • We are focusing on the community of authors we bring on board. Authors participate in the process and in shaping the company. AS AN AUTHOR I WANT TO BE PAID BY THE PUBLISHER. I DON'T NEED A COMMUNITY.
    • Your contract is author friendly. NICE TO KNOW BUT NO COPY OF THE CONTRACT IS UP ON THE SITE SO THIS CAN'T BE VERIFIED.
    • All publishers expect the author to handle a lot of the marketing--we are just more upfront about it! AND HOW IS THAT A GOOD THING? COMMERCIAL PUBLISHERS WILL HAVE AT LEAST PAID THE AUTHOR AN ADVANCE, WHICH NEW LIBRI DOESN'T EVEN DO. SO IN THE WORST CASE SCENARIO, YOU'VE PAID $5K AND ARE NOW DOING ALL THE HAWKING YOURSELF IN RETURN FOR ONLY A PERCENTAGE OF THE PROFIT. TO REPEAT, SELF-PUBLISHING WOULD AT LEAST ALLOW YOU TO CONTROL COST AND PRICE.
    • We have a shared risk model that is quite unique. LIKE I SAID, THERE'S NOTHING UNIQUE ABOUT VANITY PUBLISHING.
    • You always retain the rights to your manuscript and if anything should happen to us, we give you the ebook and print layout formats to use. IF NEW LIBRI ARE PUBLISHING THEN THEY NEED A LICENCE TO PUBLISH FROM THE AUTHOR SO THEY'RE TAKING FIRST PUBLISHING RIGHTS IN PHYSIAL AND ELECTRONIC FORMATS. ONCE THOSE RIGHTS ARE GONE, THE AUTHOR CAN'T SELL THE BOOK AGAIN. IF NEW LIBRI GO UNDER THEN DEPENDING ON HOW AND WHERE IT'S INCORPORATED THE RIGHTS MAY SIT WITH A RECEIVER WHO CAN SELL THEM ONTO ANOTHER PUBLISHER WITHOUT THE AUTHOR'S CONSENT. HOWEVER WHAT GENERALLY HAPPENS WHEN A NEW PUBLISHER GOES UNDER IS THAT THE PEOPLE BEHIND IT DISAPPEAR LEAVING THE RIGHTS IN LIMBO
    New Libri Press Website:
    We encourage direct submissions, but agents are welcome. Include full name, postal mailing address, telephone number with area code, and e-mail address.
    No reputable agent will submit to New Libri because there's no money to be made. Anyone with the slightest inkling of how publishing worked would be aware of that.

    New Libri Press Website: (BOLDING MINE)
    New Libri is a new company. Not surprisingly, that means we are excited to build our community and we are interested in authors who are early adopters. Those early adopters will receive added incentives--primarily added attention in editing.
    Huh? It's in New Libri's interests to make sure that all books it plans to publish are given appropriate editing attention. The fact that you're one of the first people to sign off shouldn't mean you get extra special attention (which is completely immeasurable anyway).

    ISBN_Writer:
    I did have an offer to publish from New Libri Press. Does anyone know anything about them?
    It's usually better to do your due diligence before submitting rather than afterwards because it means you don't waste time and emotional energy on publishers who (in my opinion) don't offer anything more than you could do yourself with self-publishing.

    ISBN_Writer:
    The individual I am working with is the co-founder of the press. He has a lot of experience in computer programming and management and is working on a MFA.
    None of this represents publishing experience. Why go with a (nice) but unqualified amateur?

    ISBN_Writer:
    They offered to publish my book using the first method--the traditional press, which means they cover all costs, help market and get reviews, and only make money when I do.
    It's not traditional publishing because they're not offering you an advance. At best, it's royalty-based publishing. What are they specifically going to do to market and sell your book? Where is it going to be available? Can they place it in stores? How much will the cover price be? What percentage of royalties do you get and how are those royalties calculated?

    ISBN_Writer:
    I am seriously considering their offer. Any advice?
    Don't be their guinea pig. Wait and see what happens with their initial releases and see if they're still in business in 2 years time.

    MM

  5. #5
    Writer is as Writer does Terie's Avatar
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    Subsidy publishing, wherein the author shares costs, has been around for hundreds of years and is not, as their site proclaims, 'quite unique'.

    Just for fun, I googled 'subsidy publishing', and here's the first hit. Notice the copyright for that page is 2001.

    Any number of micropress start-ups in the past decade have used the subsidy model. Many (maybe even most) of those were started by well-meaning but clueless people and have since gone out of business.

    The fact that the folks running New Libri don't seem to be aware that the model is not unique at all ought to raise concerns right there. What else don't they know about the publishing industry?
    Changing Gears (available now) -- Winning the race doesnít equal winning at life.

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  6. #6
    Wilde about Oscar aliceshortcake's Avatar
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    More info here, where New Libri author Debra Borys wrote:

    New Libri is the small press that will be publishing my suspense novel, Painted Black. They are taking a new approach in an attempt to be a one stop shopping publisher. They offer Traditional Publishing, Collaborative Publishing and services for those interested in self publishing. My novel is under contract with the traditional model and while I did not get an advance, I will be getting a much larger royalty than the bigger houses offer. Check them out if you are interested.
    http://agentqueryconnect.com/index.php?/topic/3562-new-libri-press/
    Painted Black is mentioned on New Libri's Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewLibri) but not on their website, which is odd because the novel was due to be released "this fall".

    Also:

    New Libri is a small book publishing company, focused on the next generation of publishing.

    Just as the music industry changed, and continues to change, as the simultaneous pressures of digital music and accessibility via the Internet and small devices converged, so too will book publishing.

    The behemoths are certainly changing, but at their own pace and without any regard for the author. This is true even with the giant booksellers. New Libri takes a different approach which is geared toward the realities of book publishing as an unpublished, or little known author. Come joint us on ďThe Next Renaissance in Book Publishing.Ē ô

    http://www.linkedin.com/company/new-...w.newlibri.com
    According to LinkedIn, New Libri is privately held and has between one and ten employees. Shouldn't a company spearheading the next renaissance in book publishing be a bit more open about the identity and previous experience of its owner and staff?

  7. #7
    Writer is as Writer does Terie's Avatar
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    They are taking a new approach in an attempt to be a one stop shopping publisher.
    (bold mine)

    Not to belabour the point, oh, heck......

    To belabour the point (), here's a thread on a micropress that went down the all-three route in 2007...and went out of business in less than two years.
    Changing Gears (available now) -- Winning the race doesnít equal winning at life.

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  8. #8
    Wilde about Oscar aliceshortcake's Avatar
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    OMG, the Living Waters saga - combining the worst aspects of a soap opera and a horror story!

  9. #9
    Tired and Disillusioned Momento Mori's Avatar
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    aliceshortcake:
    Painted Black is mentioned on New Libri's Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewLibri) but not on their website, which is odd because the novel was due to be released "this fall".
    According to ISBN_Writer, the first 3 books are due out at the end of this month. What would worry me is that the book isn't even listed on Amazon.com yet and any publisher worth its salt should at least having a pre-order page up there. I also couldn't see how much the cover price is and the cover art looks like it came from a clip folder.

    New Libri Press:
    The behemoths are certainly changing, but at their own pace and without any regard for the author. This is true even with the giant booksellers.
    Presumably they mean those behemoths that actually pay their authors advances rather than just expecting them to take a royalty cut ...

    New Libri Press:
    New Libri takes a different approach which is geared toward the realities of book publishing as an unpublished, or little known author.
    Yes, unpublished or little known authors who, I would suggest, can do so much better by self-publishing.

    MM

  10. #10
    Wilde about Oscar aliceshortcake's Avatar
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    Another forthcoming New Libri author is Acacia Awai. Her novel Scales is also coming out this fall, but again there's no trace of it on Amazon. A 28th June entry from her Facebook:

    The first half of round one in editville was completed today. Call me crazy, but Ima itchiní for round two. Scales is progressing nicely with the diligence of Michael Muller from New Libri guiding me forward and steering me away from any and all syntax faux pas.
    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Acacia-Awai/141290252611651?sk=wall&filter=12#!/notes/acacia-awai/editville/161470773926932
    At last - we have the name of a New Libri staff member (or possibly owner).

  11. #11
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    The Battle of Finding an Agent

    I appreciate all of you taking the time to help me research this topic. I had my doubts, and I think I am going to pass on them.

    Right now, I do have two agents looking at my a full MS, including:

    Muse Literary Agency and Russell & Volkening

    Overall, I have had nine literary agents look at my work. Several of them came close to picking up the MS and either requested a partial or the full MS, but so far, seven of them have passed.

    The Greenhouse Literary Agency
    Langtons International Agency
    Elaine Koster Literary Agency
    Valerie Smith, Literary Agent
    The Chudney Agency
    Bradford Literary Agency
    Felicia Eth Literary Rep.

    I've since then beefed up my query a little more. My novel is a YA, so it seems that there should be a good market for it.

    Does anyone have any suggestions for additional agents I can submit to that are looking for a MS?
    Last edited by ISBN_Writer; 10-21-2011 at 09:04 PM.

  12. #12
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    The New Libri Thread--a response from New Libri.

    Greetings to all who posted concerning ISBN_Writer's offer from New Libri Press.

    I must say that I read the thread with a combination of mock horror and laughing at some of the irony. However, ultimately, it certainly was a reminder that our website was due for an update! Rather than respond to all of thread I would note only two things.

    1) We no longer have two models. All of our publishing is the "traditional" financial model (and no, not all established presses offer advances as one poster seemed to imply). I made that clear to "ISBN_Writer" on the phone, but it appears much of the conversation was one sided.

    2) The irony that I find rich is that an unpublished author would say "let someone else be the guinea pig" in taking a chance. Ah yes, so when a new author goes to an established publishing house and that publishing house says, "Have they been published by anyone else before? No? Let someone else be the guinea pig" then we know why it is so hard for a new author to break into the business and why, even if a press may go bankrupt in two years, many authors are willing to look at small presses.

    ISBN_Writer has some potential and we wish him the best of luck. He should feel good that we did select him as unlike what several posters were implying, our current acceptance rate is about 1 out 150 submissions. I am confident that eventually, with some editing--despite his extreme reluctance to consider editing when I broached the subject--his manuscript will be accepted somewhere else.

    Cheers!
    Stanislav Kasl Fritz
    New Libri Press

  13. #13
    Tired and Disillusioned Momento Mori's Avatar
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    Hi, Stanislav, and welcome to AW.

    StanislavF:
    I must say that I read the thread with a combination of mock horror and laughing at some of the irony. However, ultimately, it certainly was a reminder that our website was due for an update!

    We no longer have two models. All of our publishing is the "traditional" financial model (and no, not all established presses offer advances as one poster seemed to imply). I made that clear to "ISBN_Writer" on the phone, but it appears much of the conversation was one sided.
    It's good to know that you're no longer operating a subsidy offer and it's also good to now that you're going to update your website to reflect this.

    As regards not all "established presses" offering advances, I'd be interested in knowing which presses you're referring to so that I can get a sense of who your company is seeking to compare itself to. I won't deny that there are plenty of royalty-only paying presses out there but they are not all a good idea for authors and on this board, I tend to recommend that authors start by looking at advance paying presses first.

    StanislavF:
    The irony that I find rich is that an unpublished author would say "let someone else be the guinea pig" in taking a chance. Ah yes, so when a new author goes to an established publishing house and that publishing house says, "Have they been published by anyone else before? No? Let someone else be the guinea pig" then we know why it is so hard for a new author to break into the business and why, even if a press may go bankrupt in two years, many authors are willing to look at small presses.
    That might be ironic if you were comparing like with like but you're not.

    First of all, you seem to be suggesting that "established" (or as I prefer to think of them, "commercial") publishing houses don't take risks on new authors. They do. All the time. And when a commercial publishing house takes on a new author, they pay them an advance - something that you are not doing, even under your "traditional" model.

    Secondly, when I tell someone to let someone else be the guinea pig, it's because there's nothing to suggest on your website that you can do what you're offering. There are no details on your own publishing experience (whether that is experience gained in a publishing house or self-publishing experience that you're now turning into a business). There are no hints as to how many books an author can expect to sell if they give you their rights.

    Most new publishers (especially those with no prior industry experience) go bust in the first two years. When they go bust, they take the author's rights with them. That's the worst case scenario.

    Even if the publisher doesn't go bust, they might sell so few books that the author finds it's not worth their while keeping the book out on the market. This is especially the case if they feel that they are doing all the marketing, promoting and selling on that title.

    You're right in saying that many authors will be willing to look at a new publisher regardless of the risks. Sadly, I see many such authors come here to recount horrific experiences - from publishers who hold their rights hostage, to publishers who haven't been recording all the sales that the author believes have been made to authors who have been encouraged to spend money on promotion and marketing that hasn't generated enough royalties to cover that expenditure to authors who want to know what they can do with their book because their publisher has shut up shop and isn't answering email or letters.

    As a result, I would *always* recommend any author who is serious about making money from their work to let someone else try you out and see what kind of sales you can make. That is so that the author has more information with which to make an informed decision as to whether your company is a good fit for their work.

    MM

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by StanislavF View Post
    Greetings to all who posted concerning ISBN_Writer's offer from New Libri Press.

    I must say that I read the thread with a combination of mock horror and laughing at some of the irony. However, ultimately, it certainly was a reminder that our website was due for an update! Rather than respond to all of thread I would note only two things.
    So, you don't consider it important to represent yourself well via the only medium many people will ever see of you?
    Who is your website aimed at? At the moment, it looks like it's aimed at writers. A publisher is in the business of selling books, so why aren't you aimed at the customer?
    If you do not have any products for the customer to buy, why isn't this the website of a business in pre-launch mode? Why isn't there a release schedule? Or any attempt at promotion? You don't even have a Twitter feed. You have been reviewing MSS for 8 months (according to your facebook yoke) but you have only 36 "likes"?

    Also, I note you have not purchased an image to use on your site - the image is credited to freedigitalphotos.net. It doesn't give a good impression when you can buy these things for a dollar.



    1) We no longer have two models. All of our publishing is the "traditional" financial model (and no, not all established presses offer advances as one poster seemed to imply). I made that clear to "ISBN_Writer" on the phone, but it appears much of the conversation was one sided.
    Why are you discussing a private conversation on a public message board? And how can you expect people to know that when your website says you have two models? You seem to suggest we are somehow at fault for reading your website and drawing a conclusion.


    2) The irony that I find rich is that an unpublished author would say "let someone else be the guinea pig" in taking a chance. Ah yes, so when a new author goes to an established publishing house and that publishing house says, "Have they been published by anyone else before? No? Let someone else be the guinea pig" then we know why it is so hard for a new author to break into the business and why, even if a press may go bankrupt in two years, many authors are willing to look at small presses.
    How do you know Momento Mori is unpublished?
    And as for letting somebody else be the guinea pig, it's good advice. There's nothing on your website to suggest you are a risk worth taking.

    From your about us page:

    Michael's experience includes running two small publishing companies in Germany, one which is still in existence.
    Maybe I'm misinterpreting this, but it sounds as though one of your guys has already presided over a failed business. The German market is also very, very different to the American one.
    He's "written, or edited" over 20 books? That doesn't mean anything. It should be written AND edited. Better yet, it should be "written X books and edited a further Y". For the ultimate in phrasing, try "wrote XXX (This great publisher, 2010) and edited Big Name Author's XXX (Tool of Murdoch publishing, 2009).

    Your website tells me you have an MFA - it doesn't mean you know how to publish or how to run a business. It tells me you were a senior executive of a number of software firms - does that make you capable of running a publishing company? And which ones? Ones I've heard of? Or is this something which sounds grander than it is?

    As I was saying above, you haven't done anything to promote your business that I can see. There are basic, basic things you are not doing. If you cannot do it for yourself, how are you going to assist your authors in doing it?
    You should have spent the last 8 months making contacts with writers. Twitter, boards like this one, Facebook - you should have been out there, promoting your new publishing house, making us excited about the books you're going to be launching with.
    Why should I risk my book with you?


    ISBN_Writer has some potential and we wish him the best of luck. He should feel good that we did select him as unlike what several posters were implying, our current acceptance rate is about 1 out 150 submissions. I am confident that eventually, with some editing--despite his extreme reluctance to consider editing when I broached the subject--his manuscript will be accepted somewhere else.

    Cheers!
    Stanislav Kasl Fritz
    New Libri Press
    That bolded bit has no business being brought up here. It is unprofessional and passive-aggressive. What ISBN_writer does is up to him. For all we know, your editing suggestion included adding a groupie.

  15. #15
    Writer Beware's Faithful Igor Richard White's Avatar
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    And regarding the question about editing, there's a big difference between someone not taking editorial advice and an author deciding not to shell out hundreds of dollars to hire an editor "recommended" by a publisher.

    Your comment is vague enough that it can be interpreted in a number of different ways.

    New publisher comes to AW and immediately goes into passive-aggressive mode? This seems all too familiar for those of us who've been here awhile. I hope I'm reading this wrong and that the publisher just hit submit before taking a breath, stepping away, and then editing their response to give a better first impression.

  16. #16
    Hapless Virago IceCreamEmpress's Avatar
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    Yes, how dare we judge a publishing company by its public presence and statements? The nerve of us all!


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  17. #17
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    I truly wish all of you the best of luck in finding the right publisher and agent for your work!

    Thanks for a lot of interesting feedback. Like feedback within a critique group, some of it will be used and some will be ignored, but it was all interesting.

    I wish I had time to respond in a thoughtful manner, but I don't. If I respond in a fast manner it will be just sloppy enough to cause another set of misunderstandings and to appear "passive aggressive."

    Off to read more submissions instead.

    Keep writing!

    SKF

  18. #18
    I write novels
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    Quote Originally Posted by StanislavF View Post
    I truly wish all of you the best of luck in finding the right publisher and agent for your work!
    Many of us have already found an agent and a publisher.

    Just so you know, these boards are frequented by lots of publishing professionals--agents, editors, writers, and others quite familiar with the industry. Your company's website had a number of red flags. You've only added to those flags by your attitude here.

    A truly professional response would be more like:

    "Oh no! I apologize for the out-of-date website. I'll fix that immediately. Thank you for letting me know."

    Followed by answering any concerns raised by MM and others.

    (Though it would be even more impressive if your website were actually up-to-date to begin with.)

  19. #19
    Girl Detective Stacia Kane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StanislavF View Post

    1) We no longer have two models. All of our publishing is the "traditional" financial model (and no, not all established presses offer advances as one poster seemed to imply). I made that clear to "ISBN_Writer" on the phone, but it appears much of the conversation was one sided.
    It's good to know you're no longer charging authors for the dubious benefits publishing with you will bring. (And MM did not imply that all established presses offer advances, only that royalty-only presses aren't always the best idea; my belief is that she said this because so many royalty-only presses are brand new and so likely to fail, and indeed many of them have and do. Many if not most royalty-only presses also have no distribution, which is another big concern for writers because of how strongly it limits their potential audience. I think she said it also out of a belief that a publisher should be well-funded/solvent enough to be able to pay advances, and should be willing to truly invest in the author up-front.)

    It's even better to know that you feel it's okay for you to reveal details of a private conversation with a private individual here, and make snarky remarks about him or her. Very professional of you; I'd certainly feel comfortable working with you after that.



    2) The irony that I find rich is that an unpublished author would say "let someone else be the guinea pig" in taking a chance. Ah yes, so when a new author goes to an established publishing house and that publishing house says, "Have they been published by anyone else before? No? Let someone else be the guinea pig" then we know why it is so hard for a new author to break into the business and why, even if a press may go bankrupt in two years, many authors are willing to look at small presses.
    There's so much wrong with this I don't even know where to begin. Had you ever been within ten feet of commercial publishing you'd know how specious your argument is, how flawed your reasoning is, and how totally incorrect your statements are. But you haven't, and I know you haven't because I've read the above.

    What exactly is wrong with an unpublished writer saying "Let someone else be their guinea pig?" Are you implying that unpublished writers have no right to want the best for their work, and to recommend that to others?

    Publishing houses don't really care so much if an author has been published before. What they care about is that the work in question is of publishable quality, and will make money for the publisher. What I find "ironic" is that someone claiming to be a publisher doesn't seem to understand that publishing is a business, and as a business it must offer the best possible quality to its customers--and those customers are readers, not writers. Publishing does not exist to serve writers. It exists to serve readers and provide them with entertainment/reading of the best possible quality.

    That means publishers have to be very selective. A new writer's chances of being commercially published by an advance-paying publisher are pretty much exactly the same as anyone and everyone else's: very good if they have a very good book, and not so good if they don't. The only way that previous credits are helpful to writers is they prove that the author in question has written well enough in the past to be published, and published by someone who knows what they're doing. This is why publishing credits from a house like, say, the New Libri Press mean nothing to agents or editors at major publishers; there's no evidence that the owners/editors of New Libri know what publishable work is or how to select it.

    Established authors still get rejections, all the time. Brand-new unpublished writers get published all the time, too. It happens every single day. Don't you subscribe to Deal Lunch?

    And the idea that an editor would say "Let someone else be their guinea pig" in reference to a previously unpublished writer shows--again--a lack of understanding of how the industry works, what the relationship is between author and editor, and what happens at a commercial publisher.


    ISBN_Writer has some potential and we wish him the best of luck. He should feel good that we did select him as unlike what several posters were implying, our current acceptance rate is about 1 out 150 submissions. I am confident that eventually, with some editing--despite his extreme reluctance to consider editing when I broached the subject--his manuscript will be accepted somewhere else.

    Cheers!
    Stanislav Kasl Fritz
    New Libri Press

    Once again, I find myself utterly shocked at your willingness to disclose confidential discussions between yourself and ISBN_Writer, including your opinion of his work. He had every right to come here and ask questions, and your obvious and transparent attempts to shame him for doing so only reflect badly on you, not on him.


    (BTW, I also have a publisher--actually I have quite a few of them, all over the world, too--and an agent. I get that you were attempting to make a dig at us all by implying we're all unpublished nobodies who don't know what we're talking about, but the trouble with that sort of thing is that we do in fact know what we're talking about--more than you, it seems--and when you don't actually know to whom you're speaking, assumptions like that only make you look bitter, petty, and frankly a bit ridiculous. Feel free to come up with some others little digs, though, if you find yourself in the mood to do so.)
    Last edited by Stacia Kane; 10-23-2011 at 07:53 AM.
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  20. #20
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    So, ignoring all the blasts on New Libri, when I took several writing workshops on submitting, one of the "rules" we were taught is never submit to anyone that you were not willing to accept an offer from. Seems like most of this could have been avoided by following that rule, especially since the person submitting said they had concerns.

  21. #21
    Wilde about Oscar aliceshortcake's Avatar
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    Nowhere did ISBN_Writer state that he/she had doubts about New Libri before the ms was submitted. The information brought to light as a result of ISBN_Writer's first post, not to mention Stanislav Fritz's shockingly unprofessional response, indicate that the "blasts on New Libri" are fully warranted.

    I can't help noticing that of the three novels slated for release at the end of this month, two of them have virtually no internet presence and aren't available for pre-order through Amazon. They weren't even mentioned on New Libri's website until the company was featured on on Absolutewrite. A Google search for the third novel, Tobin Loshento's The Katar Legacy, produced absolutely nothing. I don't see how anyone will buy these books unless they're personally acquainted with the authors.

    Oh, and from New Libri's updated site:

    2011 Releases are comming!!
    Yes, that fills me with confidence about the standard of New Libri's editing. And don't get me started on the comma abuse and Random Capitalization to be found on their site.
    Last edited by aliceshortcake; 10-23-2011 at 02:28 PM.

  22. #22
    Mostly Harmless SuperModerator CaoPaux's Avatar
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    First books are up on Amazon ....
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  23. #23
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin dborys's Avatar
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    From a New Libri Author Perspective

    I know this thread is old, but I only just discovered it and as one of New Libri's authors, I wanted to throw in my two cents. There have been valid points made here, and they are all things I took into consideration before signing a contract with them. For me, choosing New Libri was an experiment from the beginning. I guess you could say we were two guinea pigs taking chances with each other. Because my suspense novel Painted Black is kind of a quirky take on the genre, I had many agents and publishers saying they liked the idea and thought I wrote well, but no one wanted to take a chance it would find a large enough market to make it worthwhile. I had finally decided to either self-publish or move on to the next project when the opportunity came up with New Libri.

    My experience with them echoes ISBN_Writer's original comment about the publisher being professional and helpful. So much so that I recently signed a contract for a second book in the series. They took a chance with me and Iím willing to give them a little rope to run with and see how well they place in the race. Their terms cost me nothing, donít box me into anything Iím uncomfortable with, and leave room for me to leave them if I choose when the limited term of the contract is up. I can even take the series with me if I do.

    They have also been very supportive and make their writers feel like we are working together to make our books and the company a success. It feels less like a publisher/author relationship and more like a co-op, and for right now, for these two novels, at least, itís working for me and the 16 other writers they have signed up since they started.

    If anyone wants to know more about my experience with New Libri, I would be happy to communicate by email or through my website at www.debra-r-borys.com.
    Debra R. Borys
    deb@debra-r-borys.com
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~
    www.debra-r-borys.com
    www.paintedblacknovel.com
    www.bendmeshapeme.net
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Author of Painted Black

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