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Thread: Burning Effigy Press

  1. #1
    Prying Open My Third Eye Darren Frey's Avatar
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    Burning Effigy Press

    http://www.burningeffigy.com/

    Has anyone ever dealt with this company before?

  2. #2
    the world is at my command jennontheisland's Avatar
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    From their About page:

    The driving force of Burning Effigy has always been that we are writers publishing writers. That said, we ain't in this shit for the bucks
    Don't plan on ever getting paid.
    You are more than welcome to take anything I say personally, whether it was intended that way or not.

    Eat This.

  3. #3
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    As a voracious reader and active member in the horror literature community, I undersand the sentiment behind the above statement, but find it wholly inaccurate and ignorant.

    The folks behind Burning Effigy are in this for the love of literature, and the desire to bring great stories to people. They're one of the best small presses I have ever had the pleasure of shopping with, and the folks behind it are amazing.

    If a story is accepted, the author will get paid. That's how things are supposed to work in the publishing world, and that's how they work with BE.

    Making comments like the one above is not only discouraging to authors, but also to small (read: micro) presses like Burning Effigy.

    I find your comment to be uninformed, unprofessional, and just plain old mean-spirited.

  4. #4
    Moderator In Name Only AW Moderator Roger J Carlson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colum View Post
    As a voracious reader and active member in the horror literature community, I undersand the sentiment behind the above statement, but find it wholly inaccurate and ignorant.

    The folks behind Burning Effigy are in this for the love of literature, and the desire to bring great stories to people. They're one of the best small presses I have ever had the pleasure of shopping with, and the folks behind it are amazing.

    If a story is accepted, the author will get paid. That's how things are supposed to work in the publishing world, and that's how they work with BE.

    Making comments like the one above is not only discouraging to authors, but also to small (read: micro) presses like Burning Effigy.

    I find your comment to be uninformed, unprofessional, and just plain old mean-spirited.
    Do you have something substantive to add? For instance, how do you know their authors will get paid? If you have first hand knowledge of their operation, what relationship do you bear with Burning Effigy?

    Otherwise, a generic "y'all are poopieheads" type post doesn't really help anyone. As professionals, the publishers should be big boys and girls who can shrug off a little mild criticism.
    --Roger J. Carlson

  5. #5
    volitare nequeo AW Moderator veinglory's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colum View Post
    I find your comment to be uninformed, unprofessional, and just plain old mean-spirited.
    And your association with this press is?

    It is great to do things for love, but it is reasonable to suggest that those not motivated by money don't tend to make much of it. Another quality to look for in a publisher is: not taking stuff personally, let alone stuff some stranger wrote on the internetz. I am sure they are putting out some great books, this forum just happens to lean towards being commercially-minded.
    Last edited by veinglory; 07-26-2011 at 03:40 AM.
    Emily Veinglory

  6. #6
    Totes Legit Author Becca C.'s Avatar
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    They've been around since 1999 (a lot of small presses don't make it anywhere near that long), they have some Bram Stoker Award nominations, and they're Canadian (a plus for us fellow Canucks). Interesting things to note.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colum View Post
    As a voracious reader and active member in the horror literature community, I undersand the sentiment behind the above statement, but find it wholly inaccurate and ignorant.

    The folks behind Burning Effigy are in this for the love of literature, and the desire to bring great stories to people. They're one of the best small presses I have ever had the pleasure of shopping with,[bolding mine] and the folks behind it are amazing.

    If a story is accepted, the author will get paid...I find your comment to be uninformed, unprofessional, and just plain old mean-spirited.
    Just curious, but if you're a shopper, then how do you know authors will be paid?

  8. #8
    the world is at my command jennontheisland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colum View Post
    As a voracious reader and active member in the horror literature community, I undersand the sentiment behind the above statement, but find it wholly inaccurate and ignorant.

    The folks behind Burning Effigy are in this for the love of literature, and the desire to bring great stories to people. They're one of the best small presses I have ever had the pleasure of shopping with, and the folks behind it are amazing.

    If a story is accepted, the author will get paid. That's how things are supposed to work in the publishing world, and that's how they work with BE.

    Making comments like the one above is not only discouraging to authors, but also to small (read: micro) presses like Burning Effigy.

    I find your comment to be uninformed, unprofessional, and just plain old mean-spirited.
    Yup, I'm a big old meany.

    So, how about you explain the rationale behind your foot stomping and let me and the rest of the kids on the playground know exactly how and why you think this press is all that.

    Do you work for them? Have you published with them? What are their advances like? How about the royalty rates? Is there a reversion clause for low sales? What kind of sales force and distribution do they have? What rights do they take? What systems do they have in place to exploit those rights? How often are authors paid? Is there a minimum pay out?

    I'm glad you like the touchy feely we're all in this together approach, but I can get free hugs from the homeless guy on the corner. I prefer to be paid in cold hard cash for my work.
    You are more than welcome to take anything I say personally, whether it was intended that way or not.

    Eat This.

  9. #9
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    Hello! I'm not sure the nastiness and knee-jerk judgements regarding my micro-press in this thread really warrant a professional response, but since this turns up on the first page of Google results when one searches for our publishing house I feel I need to give one.

    So to answer your questions:
    Yes, we pay. In fact, I worked out our pay scale by consulting with professional horror authors to make sure that we weren't ripping anyone off for their hard work. Hell, I've often joked that the only one who doesn't get paid at Burning Effigy is me, and that may be funny but it is also dead true.

    I mean, honestly, if you'd bothered to Google the press or myself (its founder) before jumping to these silly conclusions based on one line in our bio (which I continue to stand behind, by the way), you'd have learned that I am also the Managing Editor of Rue Morgue magazine. So I ask you, how long do think I'd survive as the books editor at one of the world's leading horror magazines if I was ripping off my authors? Do you think people wouldn't talk? Do you think that wouldn't get out in a close-knit industry like the horror one is? Of course, it would. If anything, I'm held a lot more accountable for my actions as a publisher than the owners of many small presses by the very nature of what I do for a living.

    As far as particular returns clauses, distribution networks, rights, royalties and advances go, I'm not going to get into them on here because many of these things are negotiated on an project by project basis. For instance, we don't treat a horror novella quite like we would a poetry collection, etc. But regardless I invite you to contact any or all of our authors and ask how their experiences were working with us, as I have nothing but absolute confidence that they'll say nice things about how professional we are and how hard we worked to make their releases the absolute best books they could be.

    That said, our horror line is mostly curated - i.e. I invite authors whose work I enjoy to submit - so it's probably not the best venue to submit unsolicited novellas to anyhow.

    I hope this clears things up. And I wish you all well in all your creative endeavours.

    P.S. Colum is a reviewer who co-runs DreadfulTales.com and has lots of contacts in the biz, so he'd totally know if I was dicking anyone over, because as I said, authors talk.
    Last edited by Monica S. Kuebler; 09-21-2011 at 02:25 AM.

  10. #10
    volitare nequeo AW Moderator veinglory's Avatar
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    No one was suggesting anyone was ripping off anyone. Another way to take it would be: if you are a profit-oriented professional press, your website text is possibly not 100% aligned with that identity?
    Emily Veinglory

  11. #11
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    Actually it seems like someone was:

    Quote:
    "The driving force of Burning Effigy has always been that we are writers publishing writers. That said, we ain't in this shit for the bucks"
    Don't plan on ever getting paid.
    And who said we were a profit-oriented press anyway? Certainly not me. You all asked if we paid and we do (as is only right), but I run Burning Effigy because I want to share great horror stories with the world, not to make money. That doesn't make me any less professional, just maybe a little different. Please re-read that section where I say that everyone gets paid but me, any extra money we have just gets re-invested so we can put out more books.
    Last edited by Monica S. Kuebler; 09-21-2011 at 02:46 AM.

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    I don't know about you, but I need to turn a profit in order to keep my doors open, so you can believe I'm profit-oriented. The question is, why aren't you? I see no mutual exclusivity between sharing great books with the reading community and making money.

  13. #13
    the world is at my command jennontheisland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monica S. Kuebler View Post
    Yes, we pay. In fact, I worked out our pay scale by consulting with professional horror authors to make sure that we weren't ripping anyone off for their hard work. Hell, I've often joked that the only one who doesn't get paid at Burning Effigy is me, and that may be funny but it is also dead true.
    Not many people I know are willing to work for no pay. Nice that you are. Amusing though that you equated not getting paid with ripping people off for their hard work...

    Me, I prefer to invest my intellectual property with companies that earn sufficient revenue to ensure that everyone gets paid, even the owner.

    But, as has been stated before, I'm a big old meany.

    Do you pay advances? What are your average royalty rates for novels?
    Last edited by jennontheisland; 09-21-2011 at 06:05 AM.
    You are more than welcome to take anything I say personally, whether it was intended that way or not.

    Eat This.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Monica S. Kuebler View Post
    Hello! I'm not sure the nastiness and knee-jerk judgements regarding my micro-press in this thread really warrant a professional response, but since this turns up on the first page of Google results when one searches for our publishing house I feel I need to give one.
    A single person suggesting a micropress which cares more about being "writers publishing writers" rather than developing a sustainable business plan is neither nastiness, nor a knee-jerk reaction.
    If I was signed up by you and your company went into liquidation, where does that leave me and my rights? In legal limbo? The best case scenario in that situation is that I don't get paid.


    So to answer your questions:
    Yes, we pay. In fact, I worked out our pay scale by consulting with professional horror authors to make sure that we weren't ripping anyone off for their hard work. Hell, I've often joked that the only one who doesn't get paid at Burning Effigy is me, and that may be funny but it is also dead true.
    My assumption from this statement is that you must therefore have another source of income. If you have another job, it raises questions for me about how much commitment you are able to put into this press.
    This "joke" feeds through my head and turns into "12 years in business and does not turn a profit". I'm all about the passion, but I'm also all about my gas bill. Your business has survived, which is good, but it concerns me that you don't get paid and - because I am somebody who does not wish to treat my writing as some kind of quaint hobby for my spare time - I find it off putting.

    I mean, honestly, if you'd bothered to Google the press or myself (its founder) before jumping to these silly conclusions based on one line in our bio (which I continue to stand behind, by the way), you'd have learned that I am also the Managing Editor of Rue Morgue magazine.
    So you are trying to work two full time jobs? Which one gets the short end? It had better be the press.

    So I ask you, how long do think I'd survive as the books editor at one of the world's leading horror magazines if I was ripping off my authors? Do you think people wouldn't talk? Do you think that wouldn't get out in a close-knit industry like the horror one is? Of course, it would. If anything, I'm held a lot more accountable for my actions as a publisher than the owners of many small presses by the very nature of what I do for a living.
    You wouldn't. If you were, it would be mentioned here. We have ninja Google-fu experts with a need to procrastinate.

    As far as particular returns clauses, distribution networks, rights, royalties and advances go, I'm not going to get into them on here because many of these things are negotiated on an project by project basis. For instance, we don't treat a horror novella quite like we would a poetry collection, etc. But regardless I invite you to contact any or all of our authors and ask how their experiences were working with us, as I have nothing but absolute confidence that they'll say nice things about how professional we are and how hard we worked to make their releases the absolute best books they could be.
    Great. Enthusiasm is a good thing. Contacting the authors who are under contract with any agent/publisher you are considering an offer from is standard advice.

    That said, our horror line is mostly curated - i.e. I invite authors whose work I enjoy to submit - so it's probably not the best venue to submit unsolicited novellas to anyhow.
    Hmm. I hope this is badly phrased, but in conjunction with your first para I worry that it isn't.

    I hope this clears things up. And I wish you all well in all your creative endeavours.

    P.S. Colum is a reviewer who co-runs DreadfulTales.com and has lots of contacts in the biz, so he'd totally know if I was dicking anyone over, because as I said, authors talk.
    Yes, authors do talk and one of the main places they talk is here.

    This section of AW exists to help people make informed decisions about what they do with their work. Publishers (or agents, or markets) fall into more categories than "legitimate" or "scammer".
    The other day there was a thread in another section of the board from somebody who wanted to know if they should begin looking for an agent for their 2nd (unfinished) novel off the back of their first recently published one. They were clearly very excited about being published and had also (like a thousand others before them) taken the bland pronouncements of their form rejections to heart. However, although published, they did not have a deal which would count as a publishing credit in the way they obviously thought it did.
    If they'd been here first and read the thread about the people offering the contract, they would have understood they were a subsidy publisher. There's nothing wrong with it per se, but I got the distinct impression they didn't understand what they were getting into. Their book - a year or more (at least) of their life - is now dead. They do not have a credit they can mention. They have not been given an experience of what it is like to work with an editor. I don't know if they understand this or whether that they are under the impression what they have is the same as getting a deal with the Tindal Street Press (for instance).


    You may find this thread nasty and you may think we are making knee-jerk judgments about you, but this section of the board is to help us understand our choices and pick the best ones for us. We don't want to see any writer sending query letters to agents with the words "I've had four books published by PA."
    We're not your enemies, but our priority is the writer and their work. If there is nothing wrong with your press, anybody with half a brain will see that. Maybe there will be points raised here which you are unhappy about, but not everybody will care about them. As I stress again, it's about making an informed decision - what could be a sticking point for me will not matter to other people.

    As you said, we're on the first page of Google results. We understand you feel defensive about this because we know how this section of the board works.

  15. #15
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    I don't know about you, but I need to turn a profit in order to keep my doors open, so you can believe I'm profit-oriented. The question is, why aren't you? I see no mutual exclusivity between sharing great books with the reading community and making money.
    My press is a micro-press, it runs out of my home, the sales it generates pay the authors, artists, publicity and printing costs, which is all I ask of it. Why is not profit-oriented? Because it doesn't have to be. I have a day job that pays the bills so I can afford to reinvest any extra money in releasing more books. Unlike y'all, I have no desire to be rich (weird, huh?), just to live comfortably and do what I love, part of which is working with authors and publishing horror (something I've had some success at I might add, with a couple Bram Stoker Award nominations for our titles.)

    I would disagree with you, however, about the second part of your statement about the mutual exclusivity of sharing great books and making money. I think that as soon as there's a giant black bottom line attached to anything it absolutely affects a company's output (just look at all the remakes coming out of Hollywood because they are a safer investment than original ideas these days). I've always said that one of the best things about being a micro-press is that I can release whatever the heck I want, meaning that I don't have to answer to marketing departments or put out a bunch of Twilight-derivative books because that's what's hot right now. Instead, I can take chances on edgy, unconventional horror because I am not a slave to the almighty buck. Hell, if I wanted to be that I'd just go and get a job doing acquisitions for a major or something, because then nothing would separate our little imprint from the many others out there.

    I guess what it all comes down to is we're on different ends of the creative spectrum, which is fine, I'm sure there are lots of other publishers out there who'll give you the experience you're looking for and we'll keep right on doing what we're doing because we certainly have no lack of awesome writers knocking on our door. If you ultimately don't want to publish with us because you think we're weird and unconventional, chances are we wouldn't be a good fit anyway, so you know what? Don't worry about it.
    Last edited by Monica S. Kuebler; 09-21-2011 at 03:17 PM.

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    Not many people I know are willing to work for no pay. Nice that you are. Amusing though that you equated not getting paid with ripping people off for their hard work...
    It's not ripping myself off because it is my own decision that I would rather re-invest any profit in the press rather than paying myself.

    Do you pay advances? What are your average royalty rates for novels?
    We absolutely pay advances - determined by what you're selling us, how established of an author you are. The royalty rate is currently around 20% for our titles. But that said, we release chapbook novellas primarily, not novels.

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    If I was signed up by you and your company went into liquidation, where does that leave me and my rights? In legal limbo? The best case scenario in that situation is that I don't get paid.
    We only hold the rights for the medium we are publishing you in (ie. chapbook), if we go under all those revert back to the authors instantly. And you wouldn't have to worry about being paid because you already would have been, a print run doesn't go on sale until the author has been paid for it.

    My assumption from this statement is that you must therefore have another source of income. If you have another job, it raises questions for me about how much commitment you are able to put into this press.
    This "joke" feeds through my head and turns into "12 years in business and does not turn a profit". I'm all about the passion, but I'm also all about my gas bill. Your business has survived, which is good, but it concerns me that you don't get paid and - because I am somebody who does not wish to treat my writing as some kind of quaint hobby for my spare time - I find it off putting.
    I put enough commitment in that our books have been nominated for awards and typically draw great reviews. If you were seriously interested in us, I would hope you would buy one of our releases and spend some time with it. We invest a lot of care and attention in editing, cover selection and printing, and allow our writers as much or as little input as they'd like along the way. Once again, I suggest if you have concerns about how we treat our stable of talent, just drop them a line and ask them their thoughts on us. But really, if you are that concerned about publishing with a boutique imprint than it is probably best to stick with the bigger markets - because boutique imprints are full of weirdos like me making sacrifices for what they adore and trying to treat writers right.

    So you are trying to work two full time jobs? Which one gets the short end? It had better be the press.
    Neither - I'm a workaholic. But my day job is aware of the press and I can time off for it when need be. Part of the reason we only release 4-8 chapbooks a year is because that is how many I have time to edit, layout and promote. I don't want to overextend myself, because that would be bad for the stories and our authors. As much as you may think we're flying by the seats of our pants, it is really all very calculated.

    Now, before I go, I did want to say that Burning Effigy Press was started because a long time ago I got f*cked over badly by a publisher and it almost turned me off the entire industry. So instead of being miserable and giving up on writing, I decided to change things in the small way I could, which was to start an imprint that treats writers the way that I thought I should have been treated by my own publisher. Call me an idealist, call me crazy, but thirteen years later I'm proud of the work we've done and the books we've released and the way I've run things. We've been in the game a lot longer than a lot of fly-by-night publishers with a lot more to show for it. And in the end, if our authors are happy, and our readers are happy, and our books look beautiful and are well-edited, to me that means I've done my job right (random internet speculation be damned).

    As always, I wish you all nothing but success in your creative endeavours.

  18. #18
    volitare nequeo AW Moderator veinglory's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monica S. Kuebler View Post
    Actually it seems like someone was:
    I think that was clearly a comment about press focus, not a literal accusation of theft. I would translate it into the literal meaning of "don't expect to make a lot of money".
    Last edited by veinglory; 09-21-2011 at 06:48 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monica S. Kuebler View Post
    I think that as soon as there's a giant black bottom line attached to anything it absolutely affects a company's output
    You're right. That evil money allows companies to expand and better service their authors with increased promotion, marketing, and distribution. This, in turn, allows authors to become better known, which results in more sales. Maybe your authors are different and these things don't matter. I have yet to meet one of those.

    My personal red flag is that you have a day job, and you've admitted that you don't care about expanding your company...which is fine as long as authors realize this is a side gig for you. But I think this is an important point that authors should be aware of so they don't have the wrong impression about what kind of back up they'll receive once their book is published.
    And you wouldn't have to worry about being paid because you already would have been, a print run doesn't go on sale until the author has been paid for it.
    How's that again? You pay the author BEFORE the book is sent out to market? So let's say you print up 1,000 units. Are you saying that you pay your authors royalties for those 1,000 units? What happens if those books don't sell, or come back as returns?
    Last edited by priceless1; 09-21-2011 at 07:08 PM.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monica S. Kuebler View Post
    And you wouldn't have to worry about being paid because you already would have been, a print run doesn't go on sale until the author has been paid for it.
    You pay royalties (beyond the advance) before the books are sold?




    Now, before I go, I did want to say that Burning Effigy Press was started because a long time ago I got f*cked over badly by a publisher and it almost turned me off the entire industry. So instead of being miserable and giving up on writing, I decided to change things in the small way I could, which was to start an imprint that treats writers the way that I thought I should have been treated by my own publisher. Call me an idealist, call me crazy, but thirteen years later I'm proud of the work we've done and the books we've released and the way I've run things. We've been in the game a lot longer than a lot of fly-by-night publishers with a lot more to show for it. And in the end, if our authors are happy, and our readers are happy, and our books look beautiful and are well-edited, to me that means I've done my job right (random internet speculation be damned).

    As always, I wish you all nothing but success in your creative endeavours.

    That being the case, though--that you were screwed over by a start-up press, which is unfortunately all too common--surely you see that the purpose of this forum is to help other writers avoid that exact situation, and understand that that's the whole purpose of the speculation?

    I understand you feel insulted by Jenn's comment, but if you look at it from the POV of someone who's been screwed over and seen lots of other people screwed over, surely you can see that stating outright that you don't make money from your business and don't care to can look like a red flag? That for a writer trying to earn money, having a publisher say they don't in fact do that looks like reason for caution?

    A comment on your website was taken to have a specific meaning. Turns out the meaning wasn't quite what you intended. You've explained, and now anyone who sees the original comment will see your explanation. That's another reason the forum exists. I really hope you feel better about it on reflection.

    And of course I wish you great success--or continuing success--as well.
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  21. #21
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    You're right. That evil money allows companies to expand and better service their authors with increased promotion, marketing, and distribution. This, in turn, allows authors to become better known, which results in more sales. Maybe your authors are different and these things don't matter. I have yet to meet one of those. My personal red flag is that you have a day job, and you've admitted that you don't care about expanding your company...which is fine as long as authors realize this is a side gig for you. But I think this is an important point that authors should be aware of so they don't have the wrong impression about what kind of back up they'll receive once their book is published.
    If you're publishing with us to break out as an author, you're not with the right publisher. We don't break new authors generally, as that's not our focus; we release collectible chapbooks from established genre authors who already have fans and want to do a limited-edition standalone novella-length release.

    I'm pretty sure everyone who works with us knows exactly how/where Burning Effigy fits into my life, as I'm hardly keeping it secret and discuss it in interviews often. If we're not the kind of publisher someone's looking for, that's cool too, we're small, focused and okay with being that way for now, considering we primarily put out limited-run chapbooks that are not for sale in Chapters, Barnes and Noble, etc. And I'll be the first person to tell you if you are looking for large print runs and international distribution in bookstores we're not the right press for you.

    That said, I still like to think we give the same kind of backup to our books once they're published as any other house would. We promote them, we set up signings and interviews for our authors and we regularly appear at genre and literary convention to sell our wares. This weekend alone I'm running duel launch events in Toronto and Las Vegas for our fall authors.

    How's that again? You pay the author BEFORE the book is sent out to market? So let's say you print up 1,000 units. Are you saying that you pay your authors royalties for those 1,000 units? What happens if those books don't sell, or come back as returns?
    Yes, we do. Cool, huh? Although since we mainly do chapbooks not perfect-bounds the runs aren't that big. Again, this is just one of the perks of re-investing the money I might pay myself back into the press, I can pay authors and artists promptly. As far as returned books and such, the majority of our sales happen from our website, cons/readings and a few American online retailers that carry our stock, so there aren't a heck of a lot of them, at least never so many that it has ever been an issue. I guess if it became one, we'd have to rethink things but right now for our size and roster it works rather well.
    Last edited by Monica S. Kuebler; 09-21-2011 at 09:46 PM.

  22. #22
    Knight Templar richcapo's Avatar
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    Cool. Thanks, Monica. Best of luck to you, too.

    _Richard

  23. #23
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    That being the case, though--that you were screwed over by a start-up press, which is unfortunately all too common--surely you see that the purpose of this forum is to help other writers avoid that exact situation, and understand that that's the whole purpose of the speculation?
    I wasn't screwed over by a start-up, I was screwed over by an established press. Mostly because I didn't know what I was allowed to demand as an author, but that's another story for another time.

    It's not the query about us that's bothersome - as you can see from this thread, I'm happy to answer questions - it's the negative speculation, because we have a great reputation (and maintaining that is important to us). The fact that someone on here would suggest that publishing with my press amounts to "Don't plan on ever getting paid" without doing any research to verify the truthfulness of that statement is a bit insulting, because it's absolutely incorrect. It also puts a very wrong idea into the head of anyone who might stumble upon this place while doing their own research about what we do.

    I understand you feel insulted by Jenn's comment, but if you look at it from the POV of someone who's been screwed over and seen lots of other people screwed over, surely you can see that stating outright that you don't make money from your business and don't care to can look like a red flag? That for a writer trying to earn money, having a publisher say they don't in fact do that looks like reason for caution?
    Sure, it could look like red flag, but that's why you research publishers before submitting to them. I've answered lots of email queries about how we work and even pointed some of those folks at authors we've published so they can get opinions from both sides. Also, everyone seems to be misreading what I've said about profits - just because I don't draw a salary (don't need to, I earn money elsewhere) doesn't mean we don't make money off our books, it just means that it's invested right back into the company, our authors and our releases, and that's something our talent tends to appreciate because in the end it means more attention and higher royalties for them. So maybe we are for-profit, as in "for-profit for the authors and artists."
    Last edited by Monica S. Kuebler; 09-21-2011 at 10:18 PM.

  24. #24
    Shakespearean Fool DreamWeaver's Avatar
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    Well, let me ask you the obvious question: How much better (if any) do you think your press might do if you did draw a salary from it so you could devote yourself to it full time? Or is that simply something you would never do? I'm curious, not being snarky.
    Why doesn't George R. R. Martin use Twitter? He already killed off all 140 characters.

  25. #25
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    Well, let me ask you the obvious question: How much better (if any) do you think your press might do if you did draw a salary from it so you could devote yourself to it full time? Or is that simply something you would never do? I'm curious, not being snarky.
    I'm honestly not sure, because we'd have to change our entire business plan and release structure before that could ever happen. Chapbooks alone certainly wouldn't make it sustainable to pull a full-time wage. But other Canadian upstarts such a Chizine Publications have done pretty well with genre paperbacks so there is definitely a market out there. And yes, it might be something I would consider in the future, I mean I've been asked about it enough, but now is not the right time (for a variety of personal and professional reasons).

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