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Thread: [Agency] Landolt & Associates (Lisa Landolt)

  1. #1
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    [Agency] Landolt & Associates (Lisa Landolt)

    Anyone had any experience with this agency in Ft. Worth?
    Thanks, Kree

  2. #2
    Mostly Harmless SuperModerator CaoPaux's Avatar
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    Because she's an "Entertainment Lawyer", she can charge seperately for things that regular agents wouldn’t. I’d probably go to someone like her for help interpreting a contact, but I wouldn’t seek representation. Just my personal preference.

    http://www.landoltlawoffice.com/FAQ2.html
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  3. #3
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    Smile

    I can give you a little bit of info about the Law Offices of Lisa A. Landolt. While she does do agenting, it is a law practice and not an agency. She is licensed as a lawyer to accept fees, but I have never heard of anyone being charged fees for agenting services except by commission. There may be some previously-published authors who choose to pay by the hour.

    Okay, here's what I know. One of the guys in my senior class at college cowrote a book with one of his favorite teachers that was accepted by a publisher (academic I think). To make a long story short, by the end of the year they had a falling out and the professor made it clear he was going to still publish the book but not include the student's name, even when the student was the one who did most of the writing! We couldn't find anyone who would help, except Mrs. Landolt. She spent hours of her time advising the guy in my class and sent and exhanged letters with the instructor. I didn't see the actual letters, but I have heard she basically slaughtered the instructor. So much so he ended up putting it in writing he would not publish the book without paying the student and giving him his due credit. And the best part of all this? She did it all for NO CHARGE! We're poor college kids with no money and she took on the case for FREE. She apparently does this all the time and has a link on her website where people can ask for free or low cost help.

    Would I go to her for agenting service? You bet, but she's pretty picky because she only agents a handful of writers at a time, I'm guessing mostly law or victim related books. Hope this helps. Oh, and the moral of the story is, even if it is your favorite teacher, always get it in writing upfront if you are going to do a project with them!

    Christianne (some of you may know me from WritersNet )
    Last edited by Christi Anne; 05-20-2005 at 04:17 AM.

  4. #4
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    Thanks Christi and Cao

    Your info and experience are very helpful. I think I will send her a brief query, anyway. Ft Worth is only an hour away, and she does have a kindred background in writing, according to her website.
    Thanks again,
    Kree

  5. #5
    Writer Beware Goddess Absolute Sage victoriastrauss's Avatar
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    Ms. Landolt sounds like a good lawyer. However, as a literary agent there's some questionable stuff on her website--for instance, the statement on her Literary FAQ page that many authors use entertainment attorneys rather than literary agents. Some do, but it's not all that common. Also on this page, her list of differences between entertainment attorneys and "non-attorney agents" is accurate enough, but largely irrelevant.

    I also don't see any mention of sold books.

    It looks as if literary agenting is a sideline for Ms. Landolt. You have to ask yourself, do you want a part-time agent who has so many other claims on her time and interests? Or do you want an agent who can give agenting her full attention?

    - Victoria

  6. #6
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    We found Mrs. Landolt in the first place through someone who had used her to agent his books (another lawyer) so there are sales at least for lawyers' books. He told us she charged him on commission only, just like other agents would. And about the FAQ, from a newbie viewpoint I thought it was relevant (and interesting). I bet she gets that question all the time, which is why she posted it on her site.

    I think the main thing is there is a big difference between a law practice and agency. Usual agency rules may not really apply or be able to apply if you look at the rules and laws lawyers have to go by. Even if she is busy, I know first hand (or rather second hand) she can give people full, personalized attention. She just takes on fewer clients so she can help them. (Her Home page says she does the entertainment law matters for 50% of her practice so it really isn't a sideline.) I know what you mean about an agency where that's all they do, but being treated as a law client where you can call and have meetings with the person agenting you might be a plus.

    As far as using entertainment attorneys, I have gotten the impression "many" people do use them for agents. I'm guessing people like professionals use lawyers so they can get the legal help, contracts, and agenting done all in one place. Check out this article:

    http://www.publishingtrends.com/copy...302agents.html


    On another topic, Victoria, you might be the one to ask this. Do you know or have you heard anything about how the "Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts" works? In our writing group, we typically come up with copyright and contract problems, and there is a Volunteer Lawyers near us. We have heard they charge like $30 for the first 20 minutes and then it goes up to the entire fee. Do you know if the lawyers who worked there are trained on literary contracts in particular? We have also heard that the literary contracts are different and you should go to someone who KNOWS liteary contracts. Or do you think it matters as long as the lawyer knows how to do contracts for artists? Would we be better off using a regular agent when (and if) we get one? Anyone out there have experience with them? Thanks for the help!!

    Christianne
    Last edited by Christi Anne; 05-21-2005 at 03:40 PM.

  7. #7
    Preditors & Editors Requiescat In Pace DaveKuzminski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christi Anne
    Do you know or have you heard anything about how the "Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts" works? In our writing group, we typically come up with copyright and contract problems, and there is a Volunteer Lawyers near us. We have heard they charge like $30 for the first 20 minutes and then it goes up to the entire fee.
    I don't see how they can claim to be volunteer lawyers if they're charging.
    When it comes to PA, the royalty check and the reality check arrive in the same envelope.

    Remember to be kind to writers who step in PA. They really don't know how bad it smells.

    The difference between PA and WLA? None. Both have the stench of dead and dying books emanating from their doorways.


  8. #8
    Writer Beware Goddess Absolute Sage victoriastrauss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christi Anne
    And about the FAQ, from a newbie viewpoint I thought it was relevant (and interesting).
    Yes, it's interesting, and it's all true (I've made some of the points myself--for instance, that agenting is a totally unlicensed and unregulated business). However, the issues raised by the differences she cites only come into play if you're dealing with bad agents. With a good (i.e., successful) agent, who operates according to accepted practice--especially if that agent is an AAR member--the potential problems she's identifying won't be problems. So while the distinctions she's making are all true ones, they're sort of a red herring.

    As far as using entertainment attorneys, I have gotten the impression "many" people do use them for agents. I'm guessing people like professionals use lawyers so they can get the legal help, contracts, and agenting done all in one place. Check out this article:
    Many agents have lawyers on retainer or on staff to provide legal counsel. Some--like Kneerim & Willams, mentioned in the article, or Graybill & English--cohabit with law firms or are run by lawyers (though literary agenting is their main, not their sideline, business). So legal counsel should be easily available if it's needed. Also, the high-profile political and media figures mentioned in that article don't have professional writing careers--many are one-book writers who probably, like Hillary Clinton, used a ghostwriter--and thus have different concerns from professional writers. I can't say that I know any fiction writers who use an IP attorney rather than a literary agent. It's my impression that as an industry practice, it's not common.

    On another topic, Victoria, you might be the one to ask this. Do you know or have you heard anything about how the "Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts" works? In our writing group, we typically come up with copyright and contract problems, and there is a Volunteer Lawyers near us. We have heard they charge like $30 for the first 20 minutes and then it goes up to the entire fee. Do you know if the lawyers who worked there are trained on literary contracts in particular? We have also heard that the literary contracts are different and you should go to someone who KNOWS liteary contracts.
    This is true. Publishing contracts have clauses and terminology you don't find elsewhere, and unless the lawyer is familiar with them, s/he won't be able to advise you competently.

    Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts is specifically geared to low-cost or pro bono services for people in the arts, including writers. If you consult with them, I assume that they'll assign you to someone who has expertise in your artistic area. I've heard from people who've used their services and have been extremely satisfied, and from others who weren't so happy. I think it depends on where you are, who you use (VLA services are provided out of existing law firms), and what your problem is.

    - Victoria

  9. #9
    Mostly Harmless SuperModerator CaoPaux's Avatar
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    http://www.landoltlawoffice.com/Entertainment.html

    Looks like a new branch of practice has developed:

    SELF-PUBLISHED AUTHORS NOW SEEKING TRADITIONAL PUBLISHERS

    It can be difficult to attain a traditional publisher for a book that you have already self-published. We consider representing self-published authors on a case-by-case basis and charge an hourly fee or a negotiated flat rate. Assistance is also provided to authors experiencing problems with self-publishers. Please contact us for more information.
    ICAO
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    Censorship always defeats its own purpose, for it creates in the end the kind of society that is incapable of exercising real discretion. -- Henry Steele Commager
    Achievers strive for excellence. Perfectionists drive themselves to extinction. -- A Grapple A Day
    I've never known any trouble that an hour's reading didn't assuage. -- Charles DeSecondat

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  10. #10
    practical experience, FTW Khazarkhum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaoPaux View Post
    http://www.landoltlawoffice.com/Entertainment.html

    Looks like a new branch of practice has developed:
    Do you think they'll actually be suing someone?

  11. #11
    Mostly Harmless SuperModerator CaoPaux's Avatar
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    Published her own novel with Avon in '08, but I'm not finding any sales credited to her.
    ICAO
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    Censorship always defeats its own purpose, for it creates in the end the kind of society that is incapable of exercising real discretion. -- Henry Steele Commager
    Achievers strive for excellence. Perfectionists drive themselves to extinction. -- A Grapple A Day
    I've never known any trouble that an hour's reading didn't assuage. -- Charles DeSecondat

    II 2016: 2017:

  12. #12
    Mostly Harmless SuperModerator CaoPaux's Avatar
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    No longer courts self-published authors, nor offers agenting in the sense of finding publishers.
    ICAO
    ---------

    Censorship always defeats its own purpose, for it creates in the end the kind of society that is incapable of exercising real discretion. -- Henry Steele Commager
    Achievers strive for excellence. Perfectionists drive themselves to extinction. -- A Grapple A Day
    I've never known any trouble that an hour's reading didn't assuage. -- Charles DeSecondat

    II 2016: 2017:

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