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Death Wizard
04-29-2007, 08:18 AM
I consider myself an open-minded liberal. I would love to see a female president. (How great would that be for our country and the world!) I believe women should receive equal pay in the workplace. Currently my wife works and supports our family while I'm a house-husband (and novelist).

But ... when it comes specifically to epic fantasy, I tend to prefer works written by men. I enjoy Donaldson, Martin, and Erikson more than I do McKillup, Le Guin, or Douglass, to name a few.

Any other males out there agree? Or have I regressed in some way?

SpookyWriter
04-29-2007, 08:22 AM
I consider myself an open-minded liberal. I would love to see a female president. (How great would that be for our country and the world!) I believe women should receive equal pay in the workplace. Currently my wife works and supports our family while I'm a house-husband (and novelist).

But ... when it comes specifically to epic fantasy, I tend to prefer works written by men. I enjoy Donaldson, Martin, and Erikson more than I do McKillup, Le Guin, or Douglass, to name a few.

Any other males out there agree? Or have I regressed in some way?
Personal taste in writing isn't a sin, by all means. The fact your wife works while you are a parent tending the home isn't a sin either. I don't think you should worry about this a bit. Now if you had said "...because women writers are boring or don't have a clue about life..." then that is a subject for debate.

Otherwise, sleep well tonight and don't worry about the small stuff.

Zoombie
04-29-2007, 08:27 AM
So far, most of my favoret fantasy books have been written by Wen Spencer and Tamora Peirce. They're both girls...and they write about girls, Tamora Peirce usually being young adult, Wen Spencer erring more on the edge of adult stuff (with elves. In Pitsberg. In the fuuuuuture!). I'm not sure if either of those count as "Epic Fantasy"...but they are fantasy!

blacbird
04-29-2007, 10:54 AM
Lots of the top fantasy writers are women. I would put Ursula LeGuin at the top of the list of modern fantasy writers, period. She's also one of the few who have delved into more straight SF, which tends to be dominated by male writers.

caw

Anthony Ravenscroft
04-29-2007, 11:43 AM
I prefer science fiction over fantasy, which simply skews somewhat toward male-heavy. That said, I adore Joanna Russ & James Tiptree, & a smattering of Kit Reed & Lisa Tuttle.

Medievalist
04-29-2007, 11:53 AM
Heck I like Tolkien, Le Guin, McKillip, Cherryh, and loathe Donaldson, Eddings, and Jordan.

You like what you like. Don't sweat it.

Pthom
04-29-2007, 12:01 PM
Imagine my surprise when I discovered that Andre Norton wasn't a guy!




I think I was well into my forties.

SpookyWriter
04-29-2007, 12:02 PM
Imagine my surprise when I discovered that Andre Norton wasn't a guy!




I think I was well into my forties.What??? Don't tell.

glutton
04-29-2007, 05:36 PM
I generally prefer male authors, too. David Gemmell, Steven Pressfield, Matthew Stover, and the father Robert E. Howard - those are my reading bread and butter. Men, I find, tend to be better at depicting action in a visual manner than women. However, Elizabeth Moon's Paksennarion series was one of my all-time favorites, and Donna Gillespie's Auriane books (not technically fantasy, but historical fiction with a warrior protag) have very well-written action. So, it's really a matter of individual differences, but more men than women write what I like to read - what else, but intense hardcore warrior action!

ps. any recommendations for authors, male or female, whose stuff I might like?

Lyra Jean
04-29-2007, 06:00 PM
I like Tad Williams, Ray Bradbury, and S.M. Stirling.

I really like "Left Hand of Darkness" by le Guin but never got a chance to finish it. I had borrowed it from the library.

Just Me
04-29-2007, 06:51 PM
I'm not sure about male authors, but I do tend to prefer male main characters. It was different when I was a preteen; I wanted to read "girl stories" then and automatically identified with female characters just because they were female. But later... I don't know... guys just became more interesting to me. There's something neat about the way men experience things that I rarely seem to find in female characters. And even if I do, I'd rather read about men.

~JM.

glutton
04-29-2007, 06:57 PM
That's just like me, only reversed; I'm a guy, who prefers female MCs - of a specific type, though. I'd rather read about a female hardcore warrior than anything else, but I'd rather read a male hardcore warrior than anything besides that.

Death Wizard
04-29-2007, 06:58 PM
Several people have brought up the point that this is more a matter of taste than a male/female issue. After reading the responses, I'm starting to agree. Thanks!

veinglory
04-29-2007, 08:09 PM
There are more male writers so you preference may have as much to do with frequency as selection. There is an avergae difference in theme between the two but you might try more hard-concept female writers rather than social concept and see if that is the difference.

Death Wizard
04-29-2007, 11:28 PM
Who would you consider hard concept?

glutton
04-29-2007, 11:50 PM
Yeah, I'm not sure what you mean either. Does "hard concept" mean more of an emphasis on plot/setting, than character?

If so, nope, that's not the basis for my preference. It's the type of characters who take center stage in the story, that matters the most to me. Of course, they have to be presented properly - "telling" that they are hardcore warriors isn't enough. They have to kick enough ass to back that title up!

southern_cross3
04-30-2007, 01:04 AM
I have heard that females are supposed to be better with fantasy, while males favor sci-fi, but haven't really experienced anything to prove that.

Oddsocks
04-30-2007, 11:01 AM
I'm like Just Me - I'm a girl, but for some reason I prefer to read male MCs (I also write these far more than female ones). I haven't noticed a preference for author gender either way, though.

jodiodi
04-30-2007, 05:34 PM
I'm a girl and while I'm supposed to be writing a fantasy romance (as well as a sci-fi one), I usually end up putting much more action in than is customary in a romance, and I also like writing from the hero's PoV ... a lot. One of my readers actually told me I seemed to write more about the hero than the heroine in my alleged 'romances'. I like reading about the male characters (most of the time) more than female, possibly because in my particular niche, females can often come across either incredibly tough or incredibly insipid unless done well. I'm not saying mine are perfect, mind you.

Toothpaste
04-30-2007, 06:48 PM
I agree with DeathWizard, I really think this is an issue of taste rather than a male/female debate. To say one prefers male authors or female authors is to say that one brings something to the table more than the other, and I am just not sure that is true. To say you happen to like a lot of male writers though, I think just seems to indicate you like those writers.

For the record, I like my JK Rowling. Not original, but there's a woman writing fantasy with a male MC too, lest we forget. (And I don't care if it is meant for kids, tons of adults read her too)

abemorgantis
04-30-2007, 07:15 PM
I don't care who wrote it; it's good, I'll read it, be it male or female author.

That said, some writers really tend to cater to one audience or another. For example, Mercedes Lackey aims her books at females and the majority of her fans are female.

Robert Adams' books are aimed at males.

Monkey
05-02-2007, 01:27 AM
You should go play the "You write like a girl!" game! It's on another thread...umm...the one with all the word games...you know the one...

Anya Smith
05-02-2007, 02:38 AM
I like: Frank Herbert, Anne McCaffrey, Karen Traviss, Alastair Reynolds, Sean Williams, Julie Czerneda, Larry Niven, Kevin J. Anderson, Ian Watson, Arthur Clarke, Nancy Kress, Julien May, Orson Scott Card, .... these are just a few.

In my case it's definitely taste. I like more male writers simply because there are more male writers in SFF.

Dave.C.Robinson
05-11-2007, 11:54 PM
I like writers' words more than their gender. I have been reading more male writers lately but that's because I've been reading more military SF lately.

Give me a good book and the last thing I care about is the author's gender.

Ordinary_Guy
05-12-2007, 01:26 AM
There are some fantastic woman writers out there the ones named above are absolutely inspirational in their storytelling ability. They can hold their own against the best of the guys.

What I wonder, though, is if some of any potential statistical skew is more correlation than causitive. More guys in the genre, so by random statistic sampling, more likely a chance that guys would fall into the "favorite" category.

Just a thought.

JBI
05-12-2007, 02:18 AM
There is a higher % of male authors in this fantasy sub-genre than females (I think, I am basing this on speculation not fact). Therefore it is only natural that you would like more male authors than female. That being said, I know plenty of excellent female authors, and plenty of excellent male authors. Generally however, I would like to see more female authors; I enjoy looking at things from the female point of view far more than from the male POV. I find it more interesting to see the world through a heroine's point of view than a hero's.

ClaudiaGray
05-12-2007, 02:47 AM
I have heard that females are supposed to be better with fantasy, while males favor sci-fi, but haven't really experienced anything to prove that.


It would come as news to Octavia Butler and J.R.R. Tolkien, that's for sure. :D

It tends to be more about taste, and I doubt there are any absolutes as to who writes what or who likes what.

Alan Yee
05-12-2007, 05:02 AM
Some people may know this about me already, if I've talked to you in the chatroom before, but basically almost all of my favorite fantasy writers are women. I also like some male fantasy writers, though they're sadly a bit outnumbered by female writers I like. (Hmmmmm. This also happens to be the case with my taste in music.)

Even so, most of the characters in my book are men (for very specific reasons that become obvious as the story progresses), but the women, in my opinion, get all the best parts.

Although I identify myself as a writer of speculative fiction in general, I've read and written a lot more fantasy/horror than SF. I wrote a few SF stories a long time before I started getting serious; now I realize SF is not one of my stronger areas. I also happen not to like SF as much. Most of what I've written lately has been dark urban fantasy.

That's just me, of course. Everybody has different tastes.

sunandshadow
05-15-2007, 09:26 AM
I went and had a look at my favorites shelf, and the authors are about 2/3 female. I generally pay no attention to the name or gender of an author I'm not familiar with, I read books that look interesting regardless of who wrote them. But it seems like the type of fiction I like seems to be written often by women and rarely by men. This type would be books which are not gritty, violent, dark, or adrenaline-packed thrillers, but instead books which are romantic, funny, and focused on relationships, psychology, and sociology.

alaskamatt17
05-15-2007, 11:15 AM
You can't really say women are better at writing fantasy than men when the fantasy genre contains the works of Tolkien, Lewis, Peake, and Martin.

You can't really say men write better SF because there's always LeGuin, Tiptree, Butler, and Kress.

As far as selecting books to read, the gender of the author is at least seventeenth on my list of criteria to judge a book by. Right behind font size on the copyright page. It really annoys me when the copyright year is hard to read.

AndreaGS
05-17-2007, 08:46 AM
I never really take into account whether or not the author (or main character) is male or female. I guess for me, it's never really made a difference. I like George R.R. Martin, Melanie Rawn, Robin Hobb, and the standard J.R.R. Tolkien best.

Eudaemonic
05-22-2007, 07:58 PM
I try to judge everyone on individual merits personally and I read just about anyone and anything - as long as it's good!
I rate Iain Banks, Raymond Feist, Orson Scott Card, Asimov, Ann McCaffrey and Robin Hobb.
They're all different, whatever the gender.

Eudeamonic

Hope you don't mind me sticking my oar in - I'm new, just looking round the topics.

Eudaemonic
05-22-2007, 08:21 PM
Just read a bit more of this post - yes Ursula Le Guin is great, and how did I forget Philip K Dick, Neil Gaiman and Clive Barker?!?
Must be mad

The only thing I demand from a book is that it makes you think - but I prefer things that have a real, gritty sense of danger. like old fairy stories - wild, dark and disturbing, verging on horror.

But I read a lot of crime stuff too.

Eudeamonic

Higgins
05-22-2007, 08:44 PM
You can't really say women are better at writing fantasy than men when the fantasy genre contains the works of Tolkien, Lewis, Peake, and Martin.

You can't really say men write better SF because there's always LeGuin, Tiptree, Butler, and Kress.

As far as selecting books to read, the gender of the author is at least seventeenth on my list of criteria to judge a book by. Right behind font size on the copyright page. It really annoys me when the copyright year is hard to read.

This reminds me. Once somebody asked me about Turtledove (A sci-fi writer who writes alternately about alternative worlds where confederates or Nazis or both have alien allies or not or both in a series of alternate alternative worlds) and I thought they said Tiptree and it went as follows:

"What do youi know about Turtledove?"
"He's really a woman."
"He is?" (internet image of a bearded hairy Turtledove in a Confederate Alien Nazi costume appears)
"No, er he's really a man or maybe a Nazi Alternative Confederate Alien (NACA). He has the Nacas for it. Wait, didn't the Naca's draw those giant images for Aliens from another world to land on in the Nazca (or is that Nazica?) Desert? Or was that the NaziIncas?"
"Why does anyone ever believe anything you say?"
"Oh, I thought you said Tiptree?"
"Is that a question?"

alaskamatt17
05-23-2007, 02:16 PM
That is awesome, Sokal.

MDSchafer
05-23-2007, 06:42 PM
I don't think it’s a sexist thing but from what I've observed is that by and large men and women have different writing styles. It's not whose better at it, it’s what style appeals more to you.

Marion Zimmer Bradley's Mists of Avalon is about as epic as fantasy gets and it’s the most original take I've ever seen on Arthurian legend. I don't believe that book could have been as good if a man, or any other person really, wrote it.

Song of Fire and Ice is pretty clearly written by a man, and had a woman written it would have been very different.

Men and women approach the world differently and so they approach writing differently. Neither approach is better but it creates sometimes dramatically different takes on genre standards, and I enjoy that.

Jamesaritchie
05-23-2007, 08:04 PM
I like quite a number of female writers, but I greatly prefer a male protagonist. I like to be the main character as I'm reading the story.

Don't like Le Guin, though I wish I did. She writes very well, but I find her male characters to be mostly off. They always throw me.

Then again, I can't think of a woman I'd want to see as president, either. But I can't think of a man I want to see as president, for that matter. Can we just leave this office vacant from now on?

Dave.C.Robinson
05-23-2007, 08:30 PM
When "None of the Above" is clearly the best candidate; they should win, Dammit!

glutton
05-23-2007, 08:44 PM
I like quite a number of female writers, but I greatly prefer a male protagonist. I like to be the main character as I'm reading the story.

I'm pretty much the opposite. I'm male and prefer female protagonists, but tend to like male writers more.

I think male writers tend to write action differently (in a way I prefer) than females. Although, that's not to say some women can't write great action too - Donna Gillespie's action scenes rule!

Or Mary Gentle... her action is just okay but she is good too; she's hardcore, unsqueamish in her writing, and her heroine from her Book of Ash is certainly tough-minded enough, no soft wuss there...

Hardcore :heart:

Death Wizard
05-23-2007, 09:16 PM
Then again, I can't think of a woman I'd want to see as president, either. But I can't think of a man I want to see as president, for that matter. Can we just leave this office vacant from now on?

Ha!!!

Jamesaritchie
05-24-2007, 12:44 AM
When "None of the Above" is clearly the best candidate; they should win, Dammit!

Just one year I'd like to see "None of the Above" as an option. But you know what would happen. Some joker would change his name to "None of the Above," and then what would we do?

Anne Lyle
05-24-2007, 12:51 AM
I'm female, but have preferred male company since childhood. Unsurprisingly, perhaps, I also tend to prefer reading (and writing) about male characters. Glancing at my bookshelves, the majority of the books are by women, but most have male protagonists, and two of my very favourite fantasy authors (Terry Pratchett and Tim Powers) are male. Pratchett is brilliant at writing both sexes, and Powers is just fantastic at historical fantasy. The only female writers I can think of who matches them for flawless command of their craft are Ursula Le Guin and Ellen Kushner...

eliflauta
05-31-2007, 06:39 AM
Well, I know that I don't really care about the author's gender as long as they can pretend they don't have a gender. Male authors that tend towards male protagonists (or an entirely male cast - ugh!) in every single book lose my interest after the first book. And vice versa for females; if there are no guys that are well portrayed as true males (there's nothing worse than an asexual character that is assigned a gender simply by a first name), it's bad. As for writing styles, everyone has a different one and while I can't argue that it isn't affected by gender, I can't say I prefer a "female" writing style over a "male" writing style.

Death Wizard
05-31-2007, 06:46 AM
[quote=eliflauta;1370629]Male authors that tend towards male protagonists (or an entirely male cast - ugh!) in every single book lose my interest after the first book. And vice versa for females; if there are no guys that are well portrayed as true males (there's nothing worse than an asexual character that is assigned a gender simply by a first name), it's bad.[quote]


That is an excellent point.

Eudaemonic
05-31-2007, 08:22 PM
Yes, I agree - unless the writer is absolutely excellent, a huge predominance in a book of one sex over another begins to get on my nerves, and I then go on to find faults in other aspects of the writing. But it certainly appears that some authors have difficulty writing the opposite sex (to whatever gender they are).

We can only hope that this isn't true of us when we write. I certainly hope it's not true of me. I would love to think that I can draw every character, male or female, so true to life that they step from the page. I try to make each one as individual as possible and hope that this is enough.

daemon

sunandshadow
05-31-2007, 09:58 PM
Well, I know that I don't really care about the author's gender as long as they can pretend they don't have a gender. Male authors that tend towards male protagonists (or an entirely male cast - ugh!) in every single book lose my interest after the first book. And vice versa for females; if there are no guys that are well portrayed as true males (there's nothing worse than an asexual character that is assigned a gender simply by a first name), it's bad.

Could you explain in more detail why it's bad? I'm particularly curious because I either write gay male romance (in which case there are only going to be one or two minor female characters) or I write about a hermaphroditic race (where I try to have both male and female personalities but everyone is referred to by the same pronouns).

Shweta
06-01-2007, 01:21 AM
But ... when it comes specifically to epic fantasy, I tend to prefer works written by men. I enjoy Donaldson, Martin, and Erikson more than I do McKillup, Le Guin, or Douglass, to name a few.

Hm, harping back to the "personal taste" thing... I adore LeGuin and McKillip myself, but I wouldn't call either of them the most readable epic fantasy, especially if you're looking for something in the Donaldson/Martin vein. LeGuin and McKillip (and Ellen Kushner) are, I think stylists. They have extremely distinct and powerful voices, but if those voices are Not Your Thing they are Not Your Thing, end of story. Nothing to do with gender per se; I think Tolkien is the same way.

I used to not read female authors. Then I found female authors I liked, and now... I think our bookshelf is about half'nhalf, possibly more female. You might be like me.

So then... have you tried Lois McMaster Bujold? She's best known for her space opera books, but she's written some great epic fantasy (The Curse of Chalion, Paladin of Souls, The Hallowed Hunt; and now another series, starting with The Sharing Knife). Patricia Briggs also writes extremely readable semi-epic stuff, and so does Sharon Shinn, when she writes fantasy. There's also Jaqueline Carey, if you can deal with her world and protagonist*. She's an immensely skilled epic-fantasy writer. Then there's Naomi Novik (His Majesty's Dragon, Throne of Jade, Black Powder War) who's writing a Napoleonic war story with dragons...

I could keep going but won't :)
* Protag is a masochistic/submissive holy-prostitute, and the world is fascinatingly skewed european.

Death Wizard
06-01-2007, 01:50 AM
Hm, harping back to the "personal taste" thing... I adore LeGuin and McKillip myself, but I wouldn't call either of them the most readable epic fantasy, especially if you're looking for something in the Donaldson/Martin vein. LeGuin and McKillip (and Ellen Kushner) are, I think stylists. They have extremely distinct and powerful voices, but if those voices are Not Your Thing they are Not Your Thing, end of story. Nothing to do with gender per se; I think Tolkien is the same way.

I used to not read female authors. Then I found female authors I liked, and now... I think our bookshelf is about half'nhalf, possibly more female. You might be like me.

So then... have you tried Lois McMaster Bujold? She's best known for her space opera books, but she's written some great epic fantasy (The Curse of Chalion, Paladin of Souls, The Hallowed Hunt; and now another series, starting with The Sharing Knife). Patricia Briggs also writes extremely readable semi-epic stuff, and so does Sharon Shinn, when she writes fantasy. There's also Jaqueline Carey, if you can deal with her world and protagonist*. She's an immensely skilled epic-fantasy writer. Then there's Naomi Novik (His Majesty's Dragon, Throne of Jade, Black Powder War) who's writing a Napoleonic war story with dragons...

I could keep going but won't :)
* Protag is a masochistic/submissive holy-prostitute, and the world is fascinatingly skewed european.

You bring up a good point. I have read virtually everything by Donaldson, Martin, Erikson, and of course, Tolkien. And most of Terry Brooks. (I'm not big on Jordan and Goodkind.) But of the female writers you mentioned, I have only read Mystic and Rider by Shinn, and way back I read the first book of Bujold's Vorkosigan series but never got beyond it. I own Dragon Bones by Patricia Briggs but haven't read it yet and I've never read Jaqueline Carey or Naomi Novik. My guess is if I had read most every book by these women, I'd love their work like you do.

glutton
06-01-2007, 02:07 AM
What good female writers of heroic fantasy are out there? Elizabeth Moon wrote some good ones in the Paksennarion trilogy a while ago. Mary Gentle's Ash books weren't bad, with very good atmosphere, setting, and characterization but a bit lacking in action for me; I'm not sure they could really be considered heroic fantasy though (though Ash is hardcore). Donna Gillespie's first Auriane book was excellent (second unfortunately not as good IMO), but her stuff is classified as historical fiction (she shows a lot of "magic", but no obviously real effects).

In the YA area, Robin McKinley's The Hero and The Crown was quite good, but she hasn't written anything in the same vein to my knowledge (the sequel, The Blue Sword maybe, but it seemed quite different to me). Also, Tamora Pierce and her multiple female knight quartlets.

Who else?

Shweta
06-01-2007, 02:30 AM
My guess is if I had read most every book by these women, I'd love their work like you do.

Goodness. I hope if you didn't love them, you wouldn't read most every book by them! :D

I'd recommend "The Curse of Chalion" even if you didn't get into the Miles books (the first couple Miles books are early novels and the protag is callow, and so they're not the best example of Bujold's writing.) If you don't like it you can yell at me. Ditto Naomi Novik.

There's also RA Macavoy's "Damiano" trilogy, though I don't remember how easy those were to get into, just that I loved them.

Glutton, in YA there are plenty more. (Love Tamora Pierce, and no, most of Robin McKinley's stuff is fairy-tale retellings, very different feel though also wonderful.)

Patricia Wrede's Lyra novels (though the early ones are....well, early).
Megan Whalen Turner's "The Thief" and sequels -- not quite epic but close.
Many many books by Diana Wynne Jones (Everyone should read The Dark Lord of Derkholm!)
Arguably Diane Duane's "So you want to be a wizard" and sequels; those are urban fantasy, but epic too.
Susan Cooper's "Dark is Rising" sequence
Dawn Cook's "First Truth" and sequels

I'm not saying all of these are at the same level; just that I found them all both easy to read, enjoyable, and worth reading. Some of them I'm a total fangirl over, and some of them I see problems with. But hey, that's being a writer :)

Eudaemonic
06-02-2007, 05:24 PM
Am feeling very ignorant. For a fantasy writer I read a lot of crime, thrillers and contemp. fiction. Don't know even half these people.

Someone recommend something to me?
Must have gritty, real danger. Dislike romance. Like Raymond E. Feist's descriptions of sieges and battles. But not too much tech-talk if it's sci-fi.
Point me at something?


daemon

glutton
06-02-2007, 05:37 PM
For female authors, any of the ones I mentioned will do. Some romantic elements, sure, but it doesn't dominate the books - should be tolerable enough.

For males, David Gemmell, Matthew Stover, Ed Greenwood (Band of Four series especially), R.A. Salvatore (you must know him already, though), David Drake (Lord of the Isles series), David Farland (Runelords series), Troy Denning (Cormyr series), Steven Brust (I prefer the Khavren books over the Taltos ones, I'm different from most in that regard though). Steven Pressfield is AWESOME, too - technically he's historical fiction, but his stuff is better IMO at being what a fantasy should be, than most fantasy. :)

Eudaemonic
06-02-2007, 06:13 PM
Cheers glutton,

Am copy-pasting and will check out.


daemon

Dave.C.Robinson
06-02-2007, 10:26 PM
For gritty fantasy, you must hunt down and read original Robert E. Howard stories. Not the later ones by others.

glutton
06-02-2007, 10:34 PM
Ah yes, Howard! Can't believe I forgot to mention him... *is a dumb fucking bastard* ...though, I was thinking of modern authors (and novels) when making that list.

BTW, what would you guys think of the theory that women do not tend as much towards writing... err, "hardcore warrior tales", as men? To be clear, I'm not saying that no women can be good at this. Like I said earlier, Elizabeth Moon, Mary Gentle, and Donna Gillespie are good, and Robin McKinley did it well the one time she tried. But would you agree that there are more men who are skilled at writing in this, uhh, subgenre? ;)

scarletpeaches
06-02-2007, 10:39 PM
Women have no right being authors. They should get back in the kitchen and cook their husbands a nice steak dinner!

Melanie Nilles
06-02-2007, 10:45 PM
Women have no right being authors. They should get back in the kitchen and cook their husbands a nice steak dinner!


:e2thud:

Eudaemonic
06-02-2007, 11:44 PM
Women have no right being authors. They should get back in the kitchen and cook their husbands a nice steak dinner!


mmmmmmmmmm...........steak

Sorry? Did someone say something?

Seriously glutton I decline to voice an opinion on this subject. Not keen on getting lynched.

daemon

Shweta
06-02-2007, 11:45 PM
Am feeling very ignorant. For a fantasy writer I read a lot of crime, thrillers and contemp. fiction. Don't know even half these people.

Then why should you feel ignorant? I bet you know a lot more about thrillers, crime stories, and contemporary fiction than we do :)

Someone recommend something to me?
Must have gritty, real danger. Dislike romance. Like Raymond E. Feist's descriptions of sieges and battles. But not too much tech-talk if it's sci-fi.
Point me at something?

Specifically by a woman, or in general?

I'd recommend Tim Powers. Especially Declare or The Anubis Gates.

And Naomi Novik, His Majesty's Dragon and sequels.

And definitely the earlier Miles Vorkosigan books by Lois McMaster Bujold -- try The Warrior's Apprentice, or the Young Miles collection.

Do you dislike romance-the-genre or characters-getting-into-relationships in general? If the latter, I'm not sure of any more. But if just the former, I'd recommend Bujold's Cordelia books (Shards of Honor, Barrayar, collected as Cordelia's Honor) and her Curse of Chalion and sequels Highly.

Her way of writing is apparently "What's the worst thing that could possibly happen to the character? Do that."

And um, see what you think of Cory Doctorow's short stories?

Shweta
06-02-2007, 11:48 PM
BTW, what would you guys think of the theory that women do not tend as much towards writing... err, "hardcore warrior tales", as men? To be clear, I'm not saying that no women can be good at this. Like I said earlier, Elizabeth Moon, Mary Gentle, and Donna Gillespie are good, and Robin McKinley did it well the one time she tried. But would you agree that there are more men who are skilled at writing in this, uhh, subgenre? ;)

I would guess, from the men and women I've talked to about writing, that more men are interested in writing in this subgenre. Even women who like reading it (in my sample group) tend to be more interested in exploring other things in their writing.

But, I have a small and doubtless biased sample of the population to go from.

But, Glutton, you might want to look up the Women of War (http://www.amazon.com/Women-War-Alexander-Potter/dp/0756402867)anthology -- I found it uneven in quality, but still worth reading overall.

Eudaemonic
06-02-2007, 11:53 PM
I would guess, from the men and women I've talked to about writing, that more men are interested in writing in this subgenre. Even women who like reading it (in my sample group) tend to be more interested in exploring other things in their writing.

But, I have a small and doubtless biased sample of the population to go from.

I disown my previous comment - you're probably right Shweta. Generally anyway.
But there are always exceptions to everything I guess.

daemon

glutton
06-03-2007, 01:08 AM
I would guess, from the men and women I've talked to about writing, that more men are interested in writing in this subgenre.

Yeah, that's a pretty good explanation for it. There are certainly women who are good at it, and probably more who would be able to good it well if they were interested. But I've just observed there are *less* who do it than men.