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Pisarz
11-23-2006, 03:56 AM
So, I got a request for a full based on a partial. (Yay!). I have made some revisions--based on a few rejections--since sending in that partial. Nothing major or plot-related--just tidying up the writing with tighter phrasing here or there, character descriptions with more originality, etc. How do I account for that when I submit the full?

I do have the original version I sent but I truly believe that the tweaking I did has improved the writing, even on the first page. Do I need to explain any of this or just send it along as is, revisions and all?

Melanie Nilles
11-23-2006, 04:32 AM
FWIW, I would send the entire manuscript and mention briefly--probably just a sentence--in your cover letter that you have done some further editing and are including the revisions of the chapters you already sent. They're probably looking at the hook in the first few chapters and now want to know if your writing holds up and the story is satisfying. You're being honest and showing that you are willing to work at improving your writing.

That's just my opinion and how I would handle the situation as a writer.

Melanie

Julie Worth
11-23-2006, 04:42 AM
I wouldn't say anything. By the time they get to it, they won't notice the difference.

Begbie
11-23-2006, 05:43 AM
I agree with Julie. It sounds as though you simply did some fine tuning. Don't make the agent think you sent it out before you felt it was polished. And you certainly don't want to mention that you tweaked it in response to rejections. Good luck on the full!

ORION
11-23-2006, 06:50 AM
The same thing happened to me when my agent asked for a second read. I told her I had a new and improved version but you do not need to.
I agree with Begbie.
Say nothing. You will give them the entire manuscript anyway.

Carmy
11-23-2006, 08:47 AM
Sometimes I'm too honest for my own good. I agree with Melanie. Mention the tweaking briefly.

You and your agent should have an honest working relationship.

Begbie
11-24-2006, 01:18 AM
No one suggested Pisarz lie. It's just completely unnecessary to mention it. I'm certain it won't threaten an honest working relationship.

janetbellinger
11-24-2006, 07:44 AM
I sent an agent a couple of revisions I made after I submitted a partial, and the agent ended up rejecting the novel. I don't know if that had anything to do with the revisions, but I have an idea they'd rather not hear about it.

FWIW, I would send the entire manuscript and mention briefly--probably just a sentence--in your cover letter that you have done some further editing and are including the revisions of the chapters you already sent. They're probably looking at the hook in the first few chapters and now want to know if your writing holds up and the story is satisfying. You're being honest and showing that you are willing to work at improving your writing.

That's just my opinion and how I would handle the situation as a writer.

Melanie

Maprilynne
11-24-2006, 07:48 AM
They will probably read the whole thing over again anyway to refresh their memory (how many of us do that with a book we read twenty pages or so of a few weeks earlier?) I think you should just send it unless your changes seriously effect the plot.

Maprilynne

Pisarz
11-24-2006, 08:23 AM
Hmm . . . opinions from all sides! Thank you one and all. This really is a dilemma for me as I've changed things around (phrasing, not plot-wise) even in the opening paragraph and elsewhere on the first page. I think I'm just afraid the agent might notice and think, "WTF?"

Nevertheless, I'm leaning toward the "don't say anything" school of thought because all the reasons mentioned in these posts are valid. Agents probably encounter this kind of thing all the time. I'll bet few, if any, have had an agent say, "Hey, did you reword some stuff here and there and change that 'tell' paragraph on page 12 to 'show' dialogue instead? I thought so. Before, your MS rocked my world. Now it sux."

It's probably a case of me being hyper-aware of every word of the MS and overanalyzing it. Thanks for contributing your thoughts.