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oswann
11-21-2006, 09:14 PM
Iran has invited Syria and Iraq to a meeting this weekend in Teheran to discuss the possibilities of stabilizing Baghdad. Phew! I'm sure these guys will sort everything out.

http://www.radiofrance.fr/franceinter/chro/geopolitique/


Os. (sorry the link is in French, I heard this on the radio this morning from Bernard Guetta. If someone finds something feel free to post)

William Haskins
11-21-2006, 09:19 PM
alternate link for dumb americans.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/meast/11/20/iraq.main/

this makes sense to me. any emergent government in iraq will have to at least establish some sort of relationship with its neighbors.

oswann
11-21-2006, 09:25 PM
As perverse as it may be if there are real signals of unblocking the situation, it would make things easier for the US.


Os.

oswann
11-21-2006, 09:40 PM
alternate link for dumb americans.



And I'm not sure you are allowed to say this now.


Os.

army_grunt13
11-21-2006, 09:44 PM
Whatever it takes to keep them from killing each other and dragging us further into the quagmire. I spent a year over there, and really have no desire to go back.

Sheryl Nantus
11-21-2006, 10:59 PM
well, it sure can't HURT the situation at this point...

greglondon
11-22-2006, 01:42 AM
smash hand!
with hammer!

http://angryflower.com/smashi.html

too funny to pass up...

Unique
11-22-2006, 02:41 AM
Is this the hand of Syria in Lebanon? (http://tinyurl.com/y9rrrd) The Lebanese seem to think so.


"Pierre Gemayel was expected to carry the mantle of the political family. Amin Gemayel, his father and the current Phalange leader, was Lebanon's president between 1982 and 1988. His grandfather, the late Pierre Gemayel, led the right-wing Christian Phalange Party that fielded the largest Christian militia and was allied with Israel during the 1975-90 civil war between Christians and Muslims.

Amin Gemayel's brother, Bashir, was elected president in 1982 but was assassinated days before taking office. Two of Amin Gemayel's nephews and Bashir's daughter were killed in the 1970s and 1980s.
The slain Pierre Gemayel was a prominent figure in Lebanon's anti-Syrian bloc, which dominates Saniora's Cabinet and the parliament - and which is now locked in a power struggle with the Muslim Shiite Hezbollah and its allies. He was elected first in 2000, then re-elected in 2005."

Similar story in the Washington Post (http://tinyurl.com/ydf9ke)with different talking points.

"Today one of our own main believers in a free, democratic Lebanon has been killed, and we believe the hands of Syria are all over the place," Saad Hariri, leader of the largest Sunni Muslim party, said in an interview with CNN shortly after the killing.

In Damascus, Syria's official news agency denounced the assassination. "Syria strongly condemns the killing," the SANA agency said. "This is a crime aimed at destabilizing Lebanon." It asserted that "Syria is careful about preserving Lebanon's security, unity and civil peace."

My point?
I guess I don't have a point. This family has been involved in serving their nation for a long time. They've been losing their sons one by one. Who benefits by the murder of these men? It isn't the people of Lebanon.

They were mentioned quite frequently in a biography I read about Anwar Sadat. Another assassination. It seems like whenever there is a person who might pull people together they get assassinated. Darn shame.

Sean D. Schaffer
11-22-2006, 03:24 AM
Iran has invited Syria and Iraq to a meeting this weekend in Teheran to discuss the possibilities of stabilizing Baghdad. Phew! I'm sure these guys will sort everything out.

http://www.radiofrance.fr/franceinter/chro/geopolitique/


Os. (sorry the link is in French, I heard this on the radio this morning from Bernard Guetta. If someone finds something feel free to post)


Well, I hope they can all figure the situation out. We Americans don't seem to be helping the situation over there all that much. I'm sure that the people in the Middle East will be better able to handle this situation than my people can.

And that, I think, is a good thing; they might be more willing to trust their own brethren than us Westerners. I wish them the best in coming to an agreement.

oswann
11-22-2006, 08:24 PM
They all want stuff which has nothing to do with the US in Iraq.


Os.

Unique
11-22-2006, 08:36 PM
http://article.wn.com/view/2006/11/22/Iraqs_fate_hanging_on_a_new_axis/


Now, if we can just stay out of it. . . .

Now, if the administration can just keep its big ego out of it. . . .

I like that you corrected your initial phrasing -

depending on what comes out of this meeting will determine whether we can stay out of it or whether we get dragged right back into it.

oswann
11-22-2006, 08:37 PM
Can you explain, OS? I don't care what they want; I care that a meeting took place and that they have a vested interest in each other. I don't care if the vested interest is in palm trees.

Me neither, but I think the idea of the alliance you quoted earlier is a major part of the meeting agenda and any leverage which can be eeked out.


Os.