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TheIT
08-01-2006, 03:51 AM
Some people seem to be able to sense changes in the weather. For example, if a storm's coming, their trick knee starts to hurt. I'm looking for examples of people being able to feel a change. What sort of feeling is it? How far in advance of the weather event? How accurate?

This is for a fantasy story I'm working on where one of my characters will have a similar talent.

Thanks in advance for any help.

dclary
08-01-2006, 05:18 AM
For most people, it's merely their bodies adjusting to barometric pressure shifts -- which usually presage weather changes. It is most often described as more (or less) pain than usual in a particular joint or appendage.

Maybe your character is so sensitive to air pressure, he can actually feel it rise or fall against his skin?

He might also be able to "smell" ozone. When a storm's brewing, especially an electrical storm, charged ions fill the air, creating ozone, or something like that. Maybe he can sense this? Tell when a storm's coming by the scent.

kikazaru
08-01-2006, 05:34 AM
I often get a headache when there is a change in barometric pressure especiall with high humidity. It feels like a sinus headache.

Saanen
08-01-2006, 03:44 PM
When I was eleven a horse stepped on my big toe. For years afterwards I could tell when it was going to snow because that toe would ache. It stopped doing that after, oh, five or six years I guess. Since I grew up in Tennessee I didn't often get to use my toe's ability. :) And it didn't ache for rain, at least not that I remember.

hjwilde
08-01-2006, 04:35 PM
I injured my hip 19 years ago. I generally have no pain or any problem walking at all but if the weather is about to go colder my hip aches - very similar to what Saanen said.

Usually what happens is that I'm asleep and I wake up because my hip is sore and then the weather is different the following day. Accuracy? 100%.

I have also known it was going to snow but I've no idea how - I just thought it would and it did. That could be the smell in the air, the type of weather we were having at the time... not sure.

I like what dclary said about being able to feel the change in pressure on his skin. I think that could work very well.

Hope that helps :)

H

Unique
08-01-2006, 04:38 PM
When I lived up North .... where it snows in abundance, I learned I could tell when it was going to snow.

My bones and my joints would start aching as if they were being crushed. I'd dose myself up with aspirin and Tylenol and when I'd wake up --- sure as ---- there'd be snow on the ground in the morning.

I believe it had to do with the changes in barometric pressure. There are things in your joints called 'baroreceptors'. Apparently some people's are more sensitive than others.

You could ask Neuro what those things are made of - I don't recall. Nerve cell bundles --- gee, it's been too long. I'd have to dig out the books and they're buried deep.

.

Zisel
08-02-2006, 01:39 AM
I have also known it was going to snow but I've no idea how - I just thought it would and it did. That could be the smell in the air, the type of weather we were having at the time... not sure.


I’m the same. I can generally tell in the evening when it’s either going to snow or the temperature will fall below freezing overnight. For me, too, the air smells different somehow—cleaner and crisper. A friend of mine described it as "dry". It might just be the evening temperature, though. I think I learned this by practice. When I was a child, during the summer we kept plants on the porch and as autumn progressed we’d go out in the evening to “check” if it would frost that night and we had to bring the plants indoors or cover any of the not-yet-harvested garden plants. My grandfather could sense it somehow and I picked up the ability.

And our cats got really nervous for a day or so before any type of earthquake, but that's not really weather, I suppose. :)

Z

Pomegranate
08-02-2006, 01:50 AM
I have two "baroreceptors" (cool word!).

One is my sinuses. When the weather changes I get a headache and my sinuses clog.
Also, I broke by big toe once (I went to kick DH, who was being a jerk, missed, and hit the leg of the dresser...instant karma ;->). Now it aches when the weather is starting to get cold or damp. The older I get, the more joints have become sensitive to this.

Both of them kick in hours before the weather has visibly changed. OTC pain killers usually nullify the pain.

Saanen
08-02-2006, 04:36 AM
And our cats got really nervous for a day or so before any type of earthquake, but that's not really weather, I suppose. :)

Z



Actually, I can tell when weather is moving in (generally a cold front) because of the way my cats act. They start playing and all but climbing the walls, way way more than usual. It's a phenomenon I have dubbed "cats and the weather." (Well, it's catchy to me.)

justJM
08-02-2006, 04:39 AM
I have a bizarre compulsion to tidy up when the barometer drops dramatically, for a big rain or snow storm. I get all 'nesty' even if I'm unaware of the weather report.

TheIT
08-02-2006, 04:44 AM
Thanks, this is interesting. I once told someone it smelled like fall outside, and he looked at me like I was insane. There's a certain snap to the air when it gets chilly, and coming from the Midwest, I always associate it with autumn.

MidnightMuse
08-02-2006, 04:57 AM
I -- and everyone I know who lives here -- can smell rain coming.

And like most people with old fractures, I can feel when it's going to snow. My sister gets a migraine any time the barometer drops.

ChaosTitan
08-02-2006, 05:46 AM
My roommate broke her ankle many years ago. It was set with several steel pins. When the weather makes a big change (dry spell to lots of rain, or when a snowstorm is coming), the joint hurts and her ankle starts to swell.

TheIT
08-02-2006, 06:23 AM
All right, so the two types of "sensing" appear to be variations on pain and smell. That'll work.

The character in my story will probably be able to sense normal weather, too, but that's not her main talent. This world is plagued by magic storms where reality goes crazy for while. They're extremely dangerous and usually fatal if you're caught in one. My character can sense the approach of such a storm because she has a magically augmented sense of touch.

What I'm imagining is that instead of an ache she'll feel a crawling sensation, like ants crawling on her skin or like being too close to a strong electrical field. The sensation starts about twelve hours before the storm hits and increases as the storm approaches to a burning sensation. It's extremely unpleasant for her, and while the storm is overhead, it's downright painful. Instead of reacting to pressure, she's reacting to too much energy in the air.

I'm still interested in hearing about other real world examples of sensing weather, so please feel free to add more.

Cath
08-02-2006, 06:38 AM
When there's a storm coming, I get really restless - actually I see my cats doing it too - I can't sit still and I find myself really on edge for no reason. I've always put it down to the electricity in the air, although that's based on no scientific evidence at all!

Cat Scratch
08-02-2006, 06:44 AM
I can smell rain before it hits.

TheIT
08-02-2006, 06:48 AM
When there's a storm coming, I get really restless - actually I see my cats doing it too - I can't sit still and I find myself really on edge for no reason. I've always put it down to the electricity in the air, although that's based on no scientific evidence at all!

That's the kind of feeling I'm imagining for my character. She'll be in a very irritable mood all day with a very short fuse on her temper. It's going to make for some fun story situations because she hates to show weakness and she's dealing with someone she can't afford to offend. Well, fun for me, the author. :D

Which brings me to another question. If you can sense the weather through pain, at what point do you feel some relief?

Snitchcat
08-02-2006, 04:03 PM
Some people seem to be able to sense changes in the weather. For example, if a storm's coming, their trick knee starts to hurt. I'm looking for examples of people being able to feel a change. What sort of feeling is it? How far in advance of the weather event? How accurate?

Hmm...

Just before the temperature starts to drop below 25 C, I usually start sneezing.

And just as it drops to approx. 15 C, I stop sneezing.

If the weather feels like typhoon, before it's broadcast, I'll get very irritable because I'm responding to the increasing temperature and humidity.

OTOH, if it's about to snow, smell normally plays a part -- the air is drier, crisper, clearer.

And as far as rain is concerned, I think just looking at the sky or sensing the 'mugginess' in the air is as far as I get.

Generally, accuracy varies widely.

hjwilde
08-02-2006, 04:11 PM
Thanks, this is interesting. I once told someone it smelled like fall outside, and he looked at me like I was insane. There's a certain snap to the air when it gets chilly, and coming from the Midwest, I always associate it with autumn.

LOL - I know exactly what you mean. My Mum and I have always talked about "that September morning smell" and we know exactly what we mean (Cold but not unpleasant, a smell of frost in the air and very fresh and clean feeling) but I doubt anyone else would have a clue :D

H

hjwilde
08-02-2006, 04:17 PM
Actually, I can tell when weather is moving in (generally a cold front) because of the way my cats act. They start playing and all but climbing the walls, way way more than usual. It's a phenomenon I have dubbed "cats and the weather." (Well, it's catchy to me.)

That's really interesting - we've only had our cats a couple of months so I haven't noticed anything like that yet. I'll have to look out for it. I know they don't react at all to thunderstorms - they sat on the windowsill throughout the last one and casually watched the traffic and the passers by <g>.

H

Soccer Mom
08-03-2006, 01:18 AM
Cats aren't the only ones who know. My horses get crazy before a storm. They are getting up there in years, but when a storm is moving in, everyone is silly and bucking. They act like colts.

three seven
08-03-2006, 01:41 AM
If there's a storm threatening, I get a terrible bone-splintering ache in my right knee. It's a really dull, sickening pain and there's nothing I can do but grimace and whinge until the weather does whatever it's going to do.

arrowqueen
08-03-2006, 02:06 AM
"that September morning smell" and we know exactly what we mean (Cold but not unpleasant, a smell of frost in the air and very fresh and clean feeling)

Yes. It's the air equivalent of biting into an icy apple.

To get back to the question, I always get a dull headache before thunderstorms and I can sense rain or snow coming because the air feels 'different' against my skin. (Mind you, the big black/yellow clouds might be a bit of a giveaway too.)

expatbrat
08-03-2006, 02:22 PM
Mum smashed her hip and femur in 57 places about 30 years ago. 100% accuracy she can tell you when it is going to rain.

My German Shepard was petrified of storms, she would do anything to get in the house and hide under the stairs hours before storms hit. She was excellent at making it impossible to drag her back out.

Did you get the reports that no land animals were killed in the tsunami? (At least, not in Thailand). Fish etc got washed on shore which killed them, but all the land based animals ran to higher ground at least 30 minutes before the wave hit – even the elephants that were tied to heavy stakes ripped the stakes right out of the ground and ran to safety. I find stuff like that amazing!



Another amazing thing is the number of animal based avators on this thread!

rsclark
08-04-2006, 02:37 AM
I have been "blessed" with a bunion on the outside of my foot. Within 12 of a storm moving in, I will get a sudden, splitting pain that requires me to immediately take medication and elevate my foot. This pain feels like a nail is being driven into the tiny bump and then radiates into my little toe. Sometimes, the pain meds don't even work! When my husband asks me what's wrong, I tell him, "A storms a comin."

Boy, am I glad when that storm hits. Also, there is a positive correlation between the amount of pain in my foot and the size of the storm.

Nanabear
08-04-2006, 03:58 AM
Some unlucky souls, myself included, can tell not only the change in certain weather patterns, such as when there is a large storm, or particularly a tornado system in the works, but can tell the arrival of solstices and equinox [equinoxes? Equini?]

Migraineurs feel changes in the barometric pressure much more strongly than 'regular folk'. I can tell, way before the local weatherman comes on the air to tell me to put my head between my knees and kiss my butt goodby cause a tornado is coming. My head will feel as if it is ready to explode. Two years ago, the talking heads on the TV were saying there were 'no funnel clouds on the ground'. I was ready to go to the hospital for a shot. Just as I picked up the phone to call my mother for a ride [since I can't walk under my own power after one of those wonder shots, let alone drive] a twister touched down right behind my house and a box elder tree tried to come into the bedroom. As soon as the wind passed on to the east, the pressure went back up, my vision cleared, and the headache lessened considerably.

Don't know if that helps or not.

TheIT
08-04-2006, 04:13 AM
All I can say as I'm reading these posts is "Ow!"

I'm glad I have to rely on the weatherman to tell me what's going to happen. What this thread is showing me is that in my WIP different people would have different degrees of sensitivity to the magic storms. My MC is an extreme example, but I could see others having similar abilities. In this world, knowing a storm is coming is a survival trait.

Nanabear, welcome to AW and thanks for putting your first post in this thread! Question - you say you can sense the solstices and equinoxes. What does that feel like? Same as for storms?

kvp8
08-04-2006, 04:21 AM
At one point when I was a kid I broke my wrist. After the cast was off, I was able to perceive changes in the weather when my wrist would feel uncomfortable or hurt a bit. Since then, for about 15 years now, I've been employing a long-range weather forecast method based on planetary positions, of all things! It's really cool and does work! I made a series of forecasts back in November and December of 2005 which have been published in Dell Horoscope magazine.

My forecast for July 31-Aug 2 called for tropical storm or hurricane formation east of the Lesser Antilles--well, what do know--Tropical Storm Chris arrived just in time. Well, I don't know if that will fit into your story or not, but I thought it was interesting given the subject you're talking about.

Kvp8
My blog: www.theweatheralternative.blogspot.com

HoosierCowgirl
08-04-2006, 08:29 AM
Not feelings, but observations -- a ring around the sun or moon means precip is on the way; insect-eating birds, especially barn swallows, flying low means rain; a heavy dew means fair weather; no dew in the morning *can* mean rain later; sun going down behind a cloud bank means rain; wind from the northwest or north means fair weather.

Of course you've heard "Red sky at night, sailor's delight' red sky in the morning, sailors take warning."

Here's some of DH's grandpa's weather sayings -- "A wind from the west suits everyone best."
"A wind from the east -- fit for man nor beast."
"A wind from the south has rain in it's mouth"

HOpe that helped!
Ann

Mayor of Moronia
08-13-2006, 08:22 PM
I find that people generally act bizarre when there are significant changes in barometric pressure....like when a weather front is approaching. I think the pressure change causes blood gases to enter or leave solution.

Aesposito
08-14-2006, 03:59 AM
I can smell when rain is coming, sometimes several hours in advance. I thought everyone could, until one day I told a friend "it smells like rain" and he looked at me like I'd just grown two heads.

I can't describe it as anything more than a smell. No feeling or tingle or pain in the joints or anything like that.

Audrey

JudiB
08-14-2006, 06:35 PM
Now, how the heck do I explain this. It's not weather exactly, but when the seasons change from summer into fall there are a couple of days that feel suspended, like nature waiting for the change. It feels a bit like anticipation.
Also like being on the high side of a swing in backward motion, just ready to slip back down. Oh, do I need writing practice.
JudiB

HoosierCowgirl
08-15-2006, 02:00 AM
If I post after Judi, then we have two Lois Lane avatars in a row :D

I've also felt my ears pop with a tornado or big front moving through. Also, my knees hurt.

The kids and animals also seem to get "squirrelly" with a weather change coming.

Ann

JudiB
08-15-2006, 05:28 AM
Especially the squirrels. Here I thought my avatar was the Gatsby Girl (or the It Girl?) and your's was a cheerleader for the Hoosiers circa 1944.

TheIT
08-15-2006, 06:21 AM
Here I thought my avatar was the Gatsby Girl (or the It Girl?) and your's was a cheerleader for the Hoosiers circa 1944.

TheIT Girl? (sorry, couldn't resist! :D )

I hadn't realized the picture was Lois Lane, either. Cool.

I think I've noticed something similar to the seasonal change JudiB mentioned. I also tend to come down with colds whenever the temperature changes drastically, especially in fall.

JudiB
08-19-2006, 03:19 AM
So like, do you know what an It Girl is? I was going to refer to her as the TheIT Girl, but was afraid no one would "catch" the reference to the "It Girl." Maybe I'll change my name here and call myself the TheITgirl and let the rumours fly.

TheIT
08-19-2006, 03:25 AM
So like, do you know what an It Girl is? I was going to refer to her as the TheIT Girl, but was afraid no one would "catch" the reference to the "It Girl." Maybe I'll change my name here and call myself the TheITgirl and let the rumours fly.

I've heard the phrase "It Girl" before which is why I made the joke, but I'm not sure of the original reference. Ah...which flying rumours do you mean?

rugcat
08-19-2006, 06:45 AM
I've heard the phrase "It Girl" before which is why I made the joke, but I'm not sure of the original reference.
Clara Bow might want to weigh in on this.

Jenan Mac
08-20-2006, 06:56 PM
Yeah, like MidnightMuse said, you can smell rain coming.
And I can usually tell when the barometer's dropping because I have asthma. If I can still breathe, we're in no immediate danger of a hurricane.

HoosierCowgirl
08-24-2006, 07:03 AM
In today's storm I was walking across the pasture -- wide open, up on a ridge -- and started to feel tingly kind of like getting goose bumps.

Cloud to cloud lighting went over.

I hurried in!

Ann

bylinebree
08-25-2006, 06:24 PM
The kids and animals also seem to get "squirrelly" with a weather change coming.

Ann

Two of my more sensitive kids get even more hyper-but-happily-wild before a major weather change. When they were little they'd literally bounce off the walls and not be able to listen at all.

Well, at least that makes two happy people!

Camilla
08-25-2006, 09:33 PM
Now, how the heck do I explain this. It's not weather exactly, but when the seasons change from summer into fall there are a couple of days that feel suspended, like nature waiting for the change. It feels a bit like anticipation.
Also like being on the high side of a swing in backward motion, just ready to slip back down. Oh, do I need writing practice.
JudiB

I'm a bit like this too - I can tell exactly what day the season changes. For example, the first day of autumn (according to me) was two days ago. I can't really explain why it is - it's just something in the air. Not just a smell or a taste, but a feeling. The closest description for the first day of spring is "the sap is rising" - a feeling of barely contained excitement. The first day of autumn...I haven't figured out how to describe that yet. It's more mournful, to me.

Strangely enough, I'm better at picking the first day of spring in Australia, and the first day of autumn in Europe. I don't know why that is. They're both around the same time-ish on the calendar, but that doesn't make much sense!

darkness
08-26-2006, 07:23 AM
removed

Mom'sWrite
08-26-2006, 07:38 AM
Hubby and I were whacked by a drunk driver 13 years ago. He had extensive injuries and I, much less so. Since then his weather predicting skills have become so precise that he's far better at the 5-day forecast than the Weather Channel. We don't even look out the window, we just ask the man (who consults with his knees, ankles, wrists, sternum and spine.)

darkness
08-27-2006, 02:09 AM
Oh, yeah, I forgot to add that another physiological response from that little iron-based organ near our noses to incoming barometric pressure changes is an increase in CLUMSINESS.
Isnt that cool? Huh?
Darkness