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View Full Version : Is is possible to quit smoking and NOT get fat...and NOT kill everyone you know?


Carole
03-25-2006, 05:52 PM
Ok, so maybe there's something in the air. I dunno. It seems like so many people I know are quitting smoking. I am rolling around the idea of starting to consider the possibility of thinking about maybe quitting smoking. Maybe.

I've been a smoker for about 9 years. It is strange that I am scared to death of putting on 20 pounds? Is it dumb to think that I will not have a single friend left because I will be so mean? Is it superficial to worry that I will start getting all wrinkly before my time? Bigger question - Why is it that this little gold pack *holds up Winston lights 100s pack and shakes it* is such a comforting thing? Comforting to the point that it's scary to think of not buying them any more?

I don't want to be a 40 year old smoker. In a coupla weeks I will be turning 38. I think I want to officially be a for-real non-smoker before I am 40. I don't want to develop that gravely voice and start hacking in the mornings. (Thankfully I don't do that - yet) I don't want to have to spritz febreze everywhere before company comes over anymore.

So, here is the problem. How do you do it? I know there are a million ways. Wellbutrin. Gum. The patch. Stepping down. Cold turkey. Do it with a friend - hubby would probably quit with me. Those of you who have successfully quit - long term - how did you do it? Do you have any surviving friends? Did you gain weight? Were you able to keep from gaining weight? How long after you quit did you start feeling better - not getting winded climbing stairs and all that?

I don't think I can do this alone. See, exercising is noticable. You get atta boys from people you know because they can see the results of your hard work. How do you keep motivated to not smoke?

Forbidden Snowflake
03-25-2006, 05:57 PM
The weight thing is mostly a problem because instead of smoking you will grab for something to eat. Oh, I'd like a cigarette, damn, I can't. Ok, let's get that Snickers.
I put on 7 kilograms like that. But if you don't start eating you usually don't really put on any weight, maybe a bit, but sure not 20 pounds.

About the people I can't help you, mine loved me enough to stick around ;)

And I first stopped smoking and just allowed myself one cigarette every day after dinner, just my bonus for not having smoked otherwise and when I didn't really miss them anymore during the day, I started to have only a cigarette on sundy, my bonus for not having smoked during the week. And once there I just made sure I stayed there and only occasionally smoke one in special circumstances, which adds up to about 5 cigarettes a year, which I personally don't find the end of the world ;)

scfirenice
03-25-2006, 06:02 PM
I think it is different for everyone. My mom quit after 35 years using the gum, my dad quit a 2 pack a day 40 year habit cold turkey....The weight isn't a big deal because IN THE END, you will get it off. You're too disciplined NOT to! Good luck.

Carole
03-25-2006, 06:18 PM
Well, hi little mommy! Haven't seen you in a while! I tried to send you a rep point, but it seized up on me. (love that pic - you look so beautiful)

Hubby has tried the gum. He says it really takes the edge off. I think maybe he hasn't been successful because I have never tried to quit with him. I just checked the almanac. Tomorrow and April 23 are the next best two days for quitting. Dunno if I am up for it tomorrow, but maybe April 23?

Perks
03-25-2006, 06:27 PM
I'm not a smoker, but I read a tip that I have passed on to several smoker-friends who have reported it very helpful. The doctor told his patients they could smoke whenever they wanted to, but they couldn't do anything else while they were smoking. They had to go outside, alone, and smoke and concentrate on the smoking of that cigarette - smoke it mindfully as it were. No having coffee or talking on the phone or flipping through a magazine. Just smoke.

He had success with many patients with this tactic and the friends that have tried it say that it dramatically cut down the number of cigarettes they smoked, right from day one. Now, getting all the way off? I dunno.

Good luck! Do it!

Lantern Jack
03-25-2006, 06:28 PM
I think the purpose of quitting smoking is so that you don't kill everybody you know. Killing everybody you know while you're quitting would be, uh, counter-productive.

Carole
03-25-2006, 06:37 PM
I think the purpose of quitting smoking is so that you don't kill everybody you know.

How's that? I thought the purpose of quitting is so that I don't kill myself. Oh well. I'm just a smoker. What do *I* know. I don't smoke around non-smokers, so how is it that I am killing them?

Killing everybody you know while you're quitting would be, uh, counter-productive.
Ya think? I was referring to the well documented irritability associated with removing nicotine from a person's system after being dependant on it for a long time.

Carole
03-25-2006, 06:44 PM
Perks, that makes total sense. I rarely just sit and smoke while doing nothing else. I am a multi-tasker! I think deliberately contemplating that cigarette would definitely get old.

One thing I do think is that I am going to have to replace this habit with another. I read once about a lady who replaced cigarettes with yoga breathing. She did it by accident. It was in the 70's when it wasn't so common to hear about the dangers of smoking and not many were targeting smokers as the largest evil this planet has ever known. She simply started taking yoga classes. She felt better. Her doctor asked her if she had though about quitting, and it was the first time it had occurred to her. She thought about it and realized that yoga breathing was similar in many ways to how a person smokes a cigarette. Deliberate. Methodical. She tried it and had great success. She put down her cigarettes and quit cold turkey. From then on, she just stopped what she was doing and took deep cleansing breaths whenever she felt the urge to light up!

dahmnait
03-25-2006, 07:01 PM
Good for you Carole, this is a hard one. First thing is to pick a date. If you think that April will be better than go for it, just remember that gives you a month to change your mind. So if you pick that date, you want to do something that will keep your resolve between now and then.

Make sure you get rid of all smoking paraphernalia. Throw out the ashtrays, put away the lighters, etc. Change your routine. If you normally smoke with your coffee in the morning (this was the hardest for me), change where and when you drink your coffee. I exercised before having my coffee in the morning. This gave me the boost I needed before my coffee. Substitute an activity for your cravings. It is better to substitute with a physical activity, since that will help fool your body. Every time I craved, I cleaned. (My house was spotless for a while.)

As for the weight, grapes were my lifesaver. When you quit your body craves the sweets because it gives the same kind of rush. I kept grapes and carrots with me at all times. Grapes for the sugars and carrots because they had the same kind of shape as a cigarette. Albeit, a very large, fat cigarette. I don't have any experience with gum or patches, but if either works for you, use them.

And most of all, use your vanity to your benefit! You can always lose weight if you gain, but you can't get rid of the wrinkles. If that fails, just keep in mind what the extra energy will do for your sex life. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/wink.gif

You can do this!

ETA: I was writing this while the other posts were happening above. Yoga would be a great tool for quitting! I wish I knew of that when I quit.

Shadow_Ferret
03-25-2006, 07:09 PM
There are many techniques to quiting smoking. Make a list of pros and cons, such as pros, your clothing won't reak of smoke, you won't have clothes with burn holes in them, your health will improve, and cons, if you can think of a con. ;)


Figure out how much money you'll save in a year and save that money and buy yourself something really cool as a gift at the end of that year.

Chew gum. Smoking is an oral fixation and that is why many people gain weight, they substitute eating for smoking. Chew gum. Chew on a pencil. Kiss someone, preferably your S.O.

I have more, but my family can't get along without me, I'll post more later.

By the way, I smoked for nearly 25 years when I finally quit cold turkey.

dahmnait
03-25-2006, 07:11 PM
We will still love when you become a raging *****! After all, we are safe from physical harm and it is only temporary. :D

kikazaru
03-25-2006, 07:11 PM
I think that first, you have to psychologically work yourself up to being a non-smoker - you have to make "not smoking" sound desirable, rather than a something to be feared. Perhaps if you convince yourself that what you are doing is not "quitting smoking" you are "getting healthy" a major part of which includes not smoking.

Getting your husband to quit with you would be very helpful. You would have a partner to talk you out of a cig if you want one, and you won't be tempted when he smokes.

You should also write a list of the pros of being healthy/quitting smoking (saving money, no smell, living longer etc). Write down what you fear most about doing so (withdrawl? losing that comfort?) and after you identify it, find steps to address it. If it's the physical discomfort use the patch or nicotine gum (which might be a good idea anyway). If it's the ritual, you have to find a substitute or take steps to avoid the situation, ie. if you always smoke with a cup of coffee, then switch to tea for awhile, if you smoke first thing when you get up - have a shower first thing instead.

The pyschological urge to smoke only lasts for a few minutes. Find something else to do instead of smoking to take your mind off of it. Try walking around the block - get a pedometer so you can see how far you go in a day (you can see the results of getting healthy rather than smoking).

Drink lots of water. Water is healthy adds no calories, and it helps to flush the nictotine out of your system.

Make sure you have lots of crunchy veggies in water in the fridge - low calorie and can satisfy the hand to mouth behaviour that you are used to.

Take the money that you would spend on smokes every day and put it in a jar. At the end of the month count it up and spend it on something for you or your family.

Good luck to you, it's a difficult thing to do.

Carole
03-25-2006, 07:15 PM
your clothing won't reak of smoke, you won't have clothes with burn holes in them,
I'm kinda fanatical about my clothes. Thankfully I don't have any with burn holes in them
your health will improve, and cons, if you can think of a con. ;)
The only con I can think of is being hateful. Maybe I should just invest in a worrystone or a koosh-ball to squeeze or something.


Figure out how much money you'll save in a year and save that money and buy yourself something really cool as a gift at the end of that year.

O.M.G. At the end of a year, I will have saved $1,460. together, hubby and I will save $4,380 because he smokes almost 2 packs a day!!! Holy CARP!!!!!

Dawno
03-25-2006, 07:15 PM
I've tried recently to quit and the weight thing I can manage - but the 'kill everyone' is the rough part. I'm beginning to think I need to go on a 2 week remote wilderness retreat without cigarettes and get my aggression under control someplace where nobody will get hurt. The first two weeks are really bad for me - I haven't made it through them yet because I don't want to lose my job.

Carole
03-25-2006, 08:50 PM
Dawno, hubby tells me thatwhen he has tried ot quit in the past, nicotine gum really helped with the irritability. It didn't take it away, but it helped take the *bite* out of it and make it more manageable.

Dawno
03-25-2006, 08:52 PM
Gum and lozenges make me very sick to my stomach. Patches make me dizzy. I have to go cold turkey. :(

MacAllister
03-25-2006, 09:06 PM
Carole--I'm in my third month of not smoking--I quit the first of the year.

I smoked for 18 years, anywhere from 1 to 2 1/2 packs a day, depending on stress levels, job-at-the-time, and so on.

The big thing for me was figuring out what holes I was using the smokes to cover over, or fill up. I feel angry? Have a smoke. I feel anxious? Have a smoke. Impatient? Insecure? Sad? Yep--have a nice smoke, and that all eases back to so much background white noise.

I used the lozenges for a couple of weeks, but they gave me the hiccups and made me sort of queasy.

Carole
03-25-2006, 09:16 PM
Mac, three months into it, is it still a battle for you? That's something I haven't heard anyone say. How long it takes to get a grip. I don't want to spend the rest of my life whimpering every time I pass a convenience store, wishing I could have a cigarette.

rtilryarms
03-25-2006, 09:17 PM
I lost weight when I quit smoking. Going on 16 years now.

MacAllister
03-25-2006, 09:18 PM
It's not a battle, like it was the first couple of weeks.

It still hits me hard, out of the blue, on occasion.

I eat a LOT of sunflower seeds, in the shell--that helps as much or more than the lozenges or gum, after that first week, did. The first week, I had blisters on the inside of my bottom lip, and the tip of my tongue from all the salt. heh.

Oh--and I started running regularly, again. I haven't gained any weight.

DamaNegra
03-25-2006, 09:22 PM
I've had many many friends try to quit smoking. And I found the number one reason why they wouldn't:

They don't want to.

Maybe, inside, you don't want to. That's why you are starting to have doubts and worrying about all the bad things that could happen to you if you quit smoking. Because, deep down inside, you don't want to quit smoking.

So, first of all, you have to convince yourself that this is what you want to do. That you won't gain weight or get irritable.

I too had to go through the quit smoking phase. Since I had a great incentive for doing so, it was not so hard to quit smoking even though everyone around me still smoked. I did it because I WANTED too.

True, every now and then (about once every 2 months) I take a cigarette because the stress of all that's happening gets to me, but I smoke one and then forget all about it, because I don't really want to smoke.

Hope that helps, the grapes and carrot things are great advice too. Plus, grapes are yummy.

clintl
03-25-2006, 09:29 PM
Good luck, Carole. Being a lifelong non-smoker, I don't have much useful advice. My parents were smokers who quit about 15 years ago, but I was an adult living on my own by then, so I really didn't see how they coped on a day-to-day basis. I think they used the gum to help.

Carole
03-25-2006, 09:31 PM
Well, of course I don't want to. ~laughing~ I like to smoke! I don't like the idea of waking up one day having to hack and cough and hock up nasty stuff to be able to breathe and I don't like the idea that my lungs won't always be my friend if I keep smoking. And yes - there is the vanity thing. I don't like the idea that I will, most assuredly, be one of those old ladies with deep crevices instead of some ordinary wrinkles. Mom is 67 - almost 68 - and hardly has any lines at all. She smoked from the time she was a senior in high school until she was 30. I didn't start until I was almost 30. Smoking is enjoyable - that's why I do it in the first place. I have to find my reasons for wanting to quit rather than finding reasons why I don't enjoy smoking. That's not gonna happen.

MacAllister
03-25-2006, 09:45 PM
Oh yeah. I LOVE to smoke. oooooooooohhhh man. Heh.

I didn't want to quit, either.

I just didn't want to go on lying to myself at the level required to justify continuing.

Carole
03-25-2006, 09:49 PM
I just didn't want to go on lying to myself at the level required to justify continuing.
Yeah - I am a master at that.

MacAllister
03-25-2006, 10:12 PM
That's what the whole crux happened around, for me. I had to realize there was never going to be that time I was magically ready.

It was never going to happen.

I wasn't going to just wake up and think, "Gee--I don't really wanna smoke, anymore."

But I was ready to stop telling myself the thousand and one lies about how I'd be one of the ones who dodged the Lung Cancer/breast cancer/cervical cancer/throat cancer/emphysema/heart disease bullets...cuz I'm soooo special.

reph
03-25-2006, 10:23 PM
Carole, what are you saying about wrinkles? I thought smokers got wrinkly earlier than nonsmokers. No?

MacAllister
03-25-2006, 10:29 PM
Reph--yes. Smokers do. Carole's saying that's why she wants to quit--cuz she doesn't want the crinkled up smoker's face.

writerterri
03-25-2006, 10:35 PM
No, but quit anyways.


This worked for me.

Every time I wanted a cig I would pretend to puff on one like I was really smoking (on a straw). I would deep breathe and it would take care of the psychological part of it. Then when I felt like I was done with the cigarette I would have a cold glass of water then chew or suck on the ice. That would take care of the oral part of it. And chew on sugar free gum so you don't snack and gain weight. If you feel irritated take a walk, hit a base ball, chop some wood, box with your hubby or pillow fight or scream in a pillow.

Every morning and evening I had a half a glass of OJ with a half of teaspoon of Arrowroot. This helps get the toxins from cigaretts out of your body quicker and shorten the withdraw time.

When your on the phone and at the computer remember to pretend that you're smoking on a straw or unlit cig.

good luck!

Terri

reph
03-25-2006, 10:48 PM
Reph--yes. Smokers do. Carole's saying that's why she wants to quit--cuz she doesn't want the crinkled up smoker's face.
In post #23, I thought she meant her mother had prevented wrinkles by smoking until age 30. Also something in an earlier post that I don't remember exactly.

Carole, get back here and straighten us out!

DamaNegra
03-25-2006, 10:50 PM
Ah, yes, the pretend-to-be-smoking thing. It's great unless you have a lighter nearby.

Carole
03-25-2006, 11:46 PM
Well, of course I don't want to. ~laughing~ I like to smoke! I don't like the idea of waking up one day having to hack and cough and hock up nasty stuff to be able to breathe and I don't like the idea that my lungs won't always be my friend if I keep smoking. And yes - there is the vanity thing. I don't like the idea that I will, most assuredly, be one of those old ladies with deep crevices instead of some ordinary wrinkles. Mom is 67 - almost 68 - and hardly has any lines at all. She smoked from the time she was a senior in high school until she was 30. I didn't start until I was almost 30. Smoking is enjoyable - that's why I do it in the first place. I have to find my reasons for wanting to quit rather than finding reasons why I don't enjoy smoking. That's not gonna happen.
Post #23, at your service, Reph. Mom smoked, but then quit when she was a lot younger than me = she doesn't have the crinkly face. She smoked while she was younger and her body was more resiliant. When she reached the age of 30, when most of us women start noticing that we aren't youngsters anymore, she quit. She quit before it affected her features.

In other words, since this thread is about me quitting smoking and all the negative things associated with smoking, everything you see in post 23 that has anything to do with the negative side of smoking are reasons I want to quit. The rest are reasons it will be hard.

rtilryarms
03-26-2006, 12:18 AM
Don't quit smoking.
Just stop.
Quit only one cigarette; the one you want the most. Mine was the first one in the morning. I HAD to have it. So I quit that one. The rest I stopped.

After sufficient time went by after the ONE that I quit, the others were easy.

I promised I would smoke again and I will. I think when the doctor sits me down one day and tells me the end is near, I am going to jump up and kiss him full on the lips. Then I am going to race to the closest store and get a carton.

I hope they will be like $1,000,002.38 per pack by then.

maestrowork
03-26-2006, 12:22 AM
Oh--and I started running regularly, again. I haven't gained any weight.

I think eating well and exercise could help with taking the edge off and keeping the weight down.

And good luck, Carole. Here's to a healthier lifestyle and smelling good.

MacAllister
03-26-2006, 01:44 AM
Ray is absolutely right--and bless his heart, he took the sharp side of my nic-fit tongue once or twice, too (*cough* abortion thread *cough*)--my diet has changed without me even noticing.

I've especially craved fresh fruit and veggies--I juiced about a million carrots because I couldn't get enough of the stuff. Your body will help, if you listen to it.

:)

Carole
03-26-2006, 02:09 AM
--my diet has changed without me even noticing.

I've especially craved fresh fruit and veggies--I juiced about a million carrots because I couldn't get enough of the stuff. Your body will help, if you listen to it.

:)
That will be nice. I like to think I am pretty in tune, (although I play horribly) and know what my body is telling me. Maybe that is why I am going to quit. Maybe I am telling me it's time, already.

MacAllister
03-26-2006, 02:11 AM
Picking a date (like April 23) is also a really good strategy. It lets you start mentally adjusting to the idea of change.

For me, it let me start changing habits in small ways--I stopped smoking while driving, for instance--to try and disconnect the big light-up triggers.

Carole
03-26-2006, 03:38 AM
Wow. Light-up triggers. Well, I just had one of THOSE. Page load. Yep, page load time is the perfect time to light up.(I know I know...no smoking at the computer anymore. I'm working on it. ETA: EEEEWWWW I just cleaned my monitor! The screen had this icky yellow-brown film all over it)

I don't have a cigarette in the morning till I have my coffee.
Then when I put the truck in drive, heading off to work.
When I get in the truck, heading off for anywhere.
Right after eating.
Waiting for food to cool. (We actually use a cigarette as a timer. If the food is too hot, it will be perfect by the time we smoke a cigarette.)
Then of course - after...well, you know. *blush*

I actually only smoke one or maybe two during the day. It's an ordeal to go out back at work, so I actually get busy and most of the time don't think about it till I am on my way home.

MacAllister
03-26-2006, 03:59 AM
See? Just starting to really think about it is a big step. :)

Here's another thing that happened with me--when I quit, suddenly I found myself sort of sucked back in time thinking about stuff I swear to god I thought I'd completely forgotten about. Childhood stuff. Old relationships.

If that happens, you've just gotta be brave and look it in the eye til you understand why it's coming up, and how smoking helped you keep it stuffed down.

It sounds weird, I know, I can't really explain it better than that, here.

reph
03-26-2006, 04:13 AM
Here's another thing that happened with me--when I quit, suddenly I found myself sort of sucked back in time thinking about stuff I swear to god I thought I'd completely forgotten about. Childhood stuff. Old relationships....

It sounds weird, I know, I can't really explain it better than that, here.
It doesn't sound weird to me. The bodily movements in smoking resemble those in suppressing anger.

Carole
03-26-2006, 05:27 AM
Oh, I totally agree, Reph. When I am at my wits end, that is when I will smoke the most. I started smoking when ex-jerk and I were going through that NASTY divorce. It's a way to deal with stressful situations.

Carole
03-26-2006, 06:47 PM
check this out:

CHANGES IN YOUR BODY ONCE YOU QUIT SMOKING

Within 20 minutes of your last cigarette:



Blood pressure drops to normal
Pulse slows to normal rate
Temperature of hands and feet rises to normal
8 hours:



Blood oxygen level rises to normal
24 hours:



Blood carbon monoxide level drops to normal
Chance of heart attack decreases
48 hours:



Nerve endings start growing back
Abilities to smell and to taste are enhanced
72 hours:



Bronchial tubes relax, making breathing easier
Lung capacity increases
2 weeks to 3 months:



Circulation improves
Walking becomes easier
Lung function becomes easier (increases up to 30%)
1 to 9 months:



Coughing, sinus congestion, fatigue, shortness of breath decrease
Cilia grow back in lungs, increasing ability to handle mucus
Overall energy level increases
3 years:



Risk of heart attack drops to that of a non-smoker
5 years:



Lung cancer death rate for one-pack-a-day smoker decreases from 137 per 100,000 to 72 per 100,000
10 years:



Pre-cancerous cells are replaced
Risks for other cancers--such as those of the mouth, larynx, esophagus, bladder, kidney, and pancreas--decrease to the level of a non-smoker

Carole
03-26-2006, 06:51 PM
or this:

Your body's ability to mend is beauty to behold!

Within ...



20 minutes
Your blood pressure, pulse rate, and the temperature of your hands and feet will all return to normal.

8 hours
Your blood oxygen level will have increased to normal and carbon monoxide levels will have dropped to normal.

24 hours
Your risk of a heart attack will have decreased by 50%.

48 hours
Damaged nerve endings have started to regrow and your sense of smell and taste are beginning to return to normal.

72 hours
Your entire body will test 100% nicotine-free and over 90% of all nicotine metabolites will now have passed from your body via your urine. You can also expect the symptoms of chemical withdrawal to have peaked in intensity. Your bronchial tubes are beginning to relax thus making it easier to breathe. Your lung capacity has also started to increase.

10 days to 2 weeks
Your brain and body have now physically adjusted to again functioning without nicotine and the more than 3,500 chemical particles and 500 gases present in each and every puff.

3 weeks to 3 months
Your circulation has substantially improved. Walking has become easier. Your chronic cough, if any, has likely disappeared. Your overall lung function has improved up to thirty percent.

1 to 9 months
Any sinus congestion, fatigue, and shortness of breath have decreased. Cilia have regrown in your lungs thereby increasing their ability to handle mucus, keep your lungs clean, and reduce infections. Your body's overall energy has increased.

1 year
Your excess risk of coronary heart disease has dropped to less than half that of a smoker.

5 to 15 years
Your risk of stroke has declined to that of a non-smoker.

10 years
Your risk of death from lung cancer has declined by almost half if you were an average smoker (one pack per day). Your risk of cancer of the mouth, throat and esophagus is now half that of a smoker's.

15 years
Your risk of coronary heart disease is now that of a person who has never smoked. Your risk of lung cancer has decreased by 80 to 90%. Your overall risk of death has returned to near that of a person who has never smoked.

MacAllister
03-26-2006, 06:55 PM
remarkable, isn't it?

Pick a goal for yourself, too, if you're goal oriented. I'm running and I hate it, but I think I want to do a marathon, probably next year.

Carole
03-26-2006, 07:05 PM
YAY ME! I just did it. I put them into the freezer. Then I decided not to have them around at all so I broke the box and threw them away. I am done. I don't think I can wait till April 23.

I swallowed a couple of liver function vitamins that my MIL gave me - detox stuff - and then I took a couple of Holy Basil capsules. Those are supposed to be for "centered calmness".

I am motivated and I am determined. Hopefully with that type of mindset this won't make me crazy.

maestrowork
03-26-2006, 07:10 PM
:hooray: :hooray: :hooray:

I am SO PROUD of you, Carole.

Now keep it up! I'm rooting for you. As an incentive... if you can keep the cigs off for two months, I might have a special prize for you by Memorial Day. StoryGirl knows what it is.

kikazaru
03-26-2006, 07:16 PM
Good for you Carole.

When my dad quit ( a 2 pack a day 30 year smoker) he did so cold turkey, but he also had gone to a "Stop Smoking Public Hypnotist" with about 1000 other people. The hypnotist told them that every time they had an urge for a cigarette, to drink a tall glass of cold water. "and that glass of water would be the most delicious thing they would ever drink." They were told to savour it, to roll it about in their mouths and to really think about how much they enjoy the water. I guess the suggestion was to substitute something readily available and very healthful for their old habit.

It worked for him - 15 years non smoker.

MacAllister
03-26-2006, 07:16 PM
Just give yourself something else to play with. :) Get a superball to squeeze and bounce and distract yourself...anything. :)

WTG, Carole!

Carole
03-26-2006, 07:19 PM
THANK you, THANK you THANK you!!!

Ray, you tease. Now I have to stick to it. I love surprises!!!

DamaNegra
03-26-2006, 07:20 PM
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/emoticonbanana.gif yaaay!! Way to go Carole!! Keep it up!!

maestrowork
03-26-2006, 07:52 PM
Just give yourself something else to play with. :) Get a superball to squeeze and bounce and distract yourself...anything. :)


Maybe that's why men have a better time quiting. ;) You know... pants have pockets...

maestrowork
03-26-2006, 07:53 PM
THANK you, THANK you THANK you!!!

Ray, you tease. Now I have to stick to it. I love surprises!!!

You'd better.

Carole
03-26-2006, 08:00 PM
Today I am cleaning. I was already cleaning anyway, so I am just adding in a lot of laundry. All the stuff that is already clean smells like cigarette smoke, so no time like the present to get rid of it, right? The one thing that bugs the hell out of me is my REALLY cool vintage ashtrays. I have some of the neatest, OLD vintage, artsy ashtrays. I guess one way of looking at it is that the former owners are probably all sick, beyond sick or at least in pretty bad shape.

MacAllister
03-26-2006, 08:06 PM
Run 'em through the dishwasher and think of some cool way to display 'em that doesn't involve actual ashes. :)

There are going to be weird little things like that--for me, I didn't want to give up my zippo.

So I still carry it. I just don't keep it filled, any more.

rtilryarms
03-26-2006, 08:30 PM
Then of course - after...well, you know. *blush*




Oh yes, i forgot that I still smoke after that to help ease the blush. It's another effective strategy that has helped me to be cig free for 16 years.

I may not smoke again until divorce.

Jean Marie
03-26-2006, 08:39 PM
Alright, Carole http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/biggrin.gif I quit 14 years ago--super ball works great--bouncing it off the wall, that is. Drink lots of water and just wait, you'll begin to crave citrus very soon.

Stay w/ it and go for lots of walks. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/smilehooray.gif

Carole
03-26-2006, 09:25 PM
Alright, Carole http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/biggrin.gif I quit 14 years ago--super ball works great--bouncing it off the wall, that is. Drink lots of water and just wait, you'll begin to crave citrus very soon.

Stay w/ it and go for lots of walks. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/smilehooray.gif
OMG, that is SO weird! I just went to the grocery store and bought a bunch of fruit and fresh veggies and I also picked up a spray can of Febreze air freshener. (That stuff is awesome - not the fabric refresher kind, but the stuff just for the air) Anyhoo, I bought....CITRUS. I never buy citrus scented anything, but for some reason I bought that. How ODD!

Oh. And I have been munching on grapes. I found a lonely little piece of nicotine gum in a drawer from the last time hubby tried to quit. I set it on the table by the remote in case later on tonight I am DYING for a cigarette.

Does anyone know how the success rates for those going cold turkey stack up to those who use the gum or patch or some other nicotine replacement therapy? I am going to try my best to do this cold turkey if I can.

MacAllister
03-26-2006, 09:34 PM
You can. The really important thing to remember is that you don't quit quitting. If you screw up and bum a smoke off a coworker...okay. So you did. You're still quitting. You don't go buy a pack and just smoke, again. :)

I don't know about the relative success rates--but the people I know that it sticks with best are the cold turkey quitters.

maestrowork
03-26-2006, 09:36 PM
My uncle smoked his entire life, and he quit cold turkey and it worked for him... Unfortunately, he quit too late (he was in his 60s) and he died of lung cancer a few years later.

Perks
03-26-2006, 09:37 PM
Hey Carole, I forgot about something. There is an herb called Lobelia. I have heard wonderful things about it (it even helped my sister and she's pathetically addicted to smoking) and the theory is it binds up on the cellular level with the same receptors that would normally take up the nicotine, so the cravings are markedly reduced. It's the key ingredient to a lot of those "stop smoking" remedies but cheaper if you just buy it on its own. Try it! May help.

Jean Marie
03-26-2006, 09:43 PM
I did it cold turkey, Carole. How'd I know I was making a prediction http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/biggrin.gif
That's funny. Most of the people I'm aware of who quit did it cold turkey. And like Mac said, if you have 1, so what, you've still quit. Stay quit.

As long as you don't buy any. At all. Eventually, friends, co-workers, aren't going to give them to you. You've quit, remember.

jenngreenleaf
03-26-2006, 10:47 PM
I quit cold turkey May 1, 1998 -- when I decided I want to have children. I figured, I really should decontaminate my body if it's going to have a baby in there. It was HARD and I only smoked for eleven years prior. To this day, I still crave now and again. I think that's the stumbling point for a lot of people -- they fail to realize the cravings really don't go away 100% . . . so, as soon as they crave, they feel like they've got to pick up again. Not so. Just come to grips with that reality and it makes thing so much easier.

Carole
03-26-2006, 11:25 PM
It's getting a little rougher as the day goes on, but I'll live through it I guess. I had to stop eating the grapes. One thing that amazes me is the reference you made. Normally you hear about how hard it is to quit after 15 years or more smoking. I have smoked for about 8-9 years and it's a real monster to kick. I guess it doesn't matter how long you've been a smoker when you quit. If you are addicted, you are addicted, right?

jenngreenleaf
03-26-2006, 11:33 PM
If you are addicted, you are addicted, right?

YES!!!!!!!!

You're doing great, by the way!!!! :Hug2:

OneTeam OneDream
03-26-2006, 11:35 PM
It's getting a little rougher as the day goes on, but I'll live through it I guess. I had to stop eating the grapes. One thing that amazes me is the reference you made. Normally you hear about how hard it is to quit after 15 years or more smoking. I have smoked for about 8-9 years and it's a real monster to kick. I guess it doesn't matter how long you've been a smoker when you quit. If you are addicted, you are addicted, right?

I quit twice and started back twice. I am not going to give you any advice, because obviously I can't stick with it. I've considered quitting again, simply for the cost, but until I can convince myself it is worth it, I just can't do it. The toughest part would be the drive to and from work. It is a total round trip of three hours with 45 minutes lacking cell service, so its not like I can call someone to take my mind off of it.

Jeez Carole, I really feel for ya right now. You are a stronger person than I am.

MacAllister
03-26-2006, 11:41 PM
Get out of the house, if you need to. Run around the block, til you're panting.

the first 24 hours are the worst.

You make it 3 days, you've got it beat--it's a mental game after that.

Kida Adelyne
03-27-2006, 01:35 AM
Remember- No matter how crazy it drives you, we will be here for you, to give you smilies for your good days and hugs for your bad days.

:hooray::hooray::hooray:

-Ally

Carole
03-27-2006, 01:50 AM
welllll. I saw this pitiful little cigarette in an ashtray in the bedroom just now. Apparently I laid it down withut smoking it. I lit it up. *sigh*

BUT

I took a coupla puffs and got dizzy as all get out. How is that possible? I mean, I only threw my pack out this morning. Good thing is that I put it out after a coupla puffs because it made my head spin.

That is too weird.

MacAllister
03-27-2006, 01:56 AM
yeah. You're just ready to quit. Good. And good on ya for just putting it out. :)

Jean Marie
03-27-2006, 03:22 AM
It made you dizzy, Carole, 'cause the nicotine is leaving your body http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/smile.gif and you reintroduced it. Pretty scary that it happens that fast, huh? As Mac said, good for you to put it out http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/biggrin.gif That's huge--you've quit smoking, yay!!

Carole
03-27-2006, 05:19 AM
BOY did I learn a lot today. First off, there are many many supplements out there that can help, for different reasons. I should be taking twice the dose of vitamin c because smokers who are quitting use twice as much. Hence the cravings for citrus! The grapes make sense because supposedly the sugars send a similar signal to the brain. Also, many smokers have an underlying hypoglycemic condition that they are unaware of, caused by smoking. Smoking and sugar affect the brain in similar ways, so you don't notice the hypoglycemia until you quit. Thankfully, then it may be reversible. (They're still researching this) There is another supplement that my MIL told me about today...forget the name of it right now, but it has an unusually deep penetrating ability in the lungs and speeds the repair of the cilia.

ALSO..and this one is a biggie for me - nicotine replacement therapy absolutely helps prevent weight gain. YAY! They're not entirely sure why right now, but they do see significantly different results (regarding weight gain) in people who use the patch, an inhaler or gum than those who use nothing. So maybe I'll get that gum after all. I wanted to avoid it because I thought it was nothing but a crutch.

dahmnait
03-27-2006, 05:36 AM
The one thing that bugs the hell out of me is my REALLY cool vintage ashtrays. I have some of the neatest, OLD vintage, artsy ashtrays.
I used my nicer ashtrays for candleholders. I bought pillar candles (scented) that look so cool in their holders, I no longer think of them as ashtrays.

Carole
03-27-2006, 05:37 AM
now that's a neat idea!

jdkiggins
03-27-2006, 06:19 AM
I've been trying to avoid this thread because I quit smoking cold turkey on March 1. Carole, you can do it. Stick with it. It's been 26 days for me, yes I'm counting the days, and I still crave a cigarette every morning and after every meal.

I wasn't too worried about gaining weight because I could stand to add on a few pounds. But even after eating several pounds of cashews, a few boxes of the new Hostess caramel HoHo's and a bag of the delightful little Kissables, I still haven't gained any weight. Of course, I'm walking up and down two flights of 13 stairs about 40 times a day, so that might explain it.

One thing I found that worked for me was stocking the refrigerator full of fruit. I sliced apples, peeled oranges and separated the slices, cut melons and honeydew into squares, sliced strawberries, plucked the grapes off the stems and put all of them in a big bowl. Everytime I wanted a cigarette, I ate a piece of fruit. It's a lot healthier than all the junk in the paragraph above. :D

Hang in there, you can do this!

louisgodwin
03-27-2006, 06:25 AM
Zyban worked great for me about 5 years ago. But when I was on it, sometimes I would lie down in bed to go to sleep and my heart would just start racing for no damn reason. It took away the cravings though.

Shwebb
03-27-2006, 10:06 PM
Carole,

Way to go! :e2cheer:

My mom just quit about three weeks ago for the second time in her life. She had started smoking as a teenager, and didn't smoke when she was pregnant, but took it back up after we were each born. About fifteen years ago she quit, but she started smoking again after she quit her job and went on disability for her nervous mental state. She's been using the patch, and she says it makes a big difference.

The first time she quit, she found that she craved her cigarettes any time she drank her coffee in the mornings--she had to stop drinking coffee for a while.

(When I'm waiting for a page to load on the computer, I play Solitaire.)

When my MIL has tried to quit, she is like Dawno--she has to go cold turkey because she can't tolerate the patch, the gum, or the lozenges; she can't even take Welbutrin! But she becomes such a b!itch her family has almost begged her to start smoking again. She smokes 1-2 packs per day, and I think she's resigned herself to it by now. I hate going to their house sometimes because after only fifteen minutes, I feel like I've been dipped into an ashtray.

Anyhoo, Carole, I know it's hard, but I know you can do it. Go, CarOLE!

Jaycinth
03-27-2006, 11:55 PM
go Ahead and quit. Yell at me if you need to. I've never smoked... (tobbaco)i

I don't know if I can even spell it...but a lot of my friends have and are quitting and I'se the designated Bi***ee.
Brenda says St. John's wort tea and capsuels help.

Way to go, you'll do it. Hey I'm looking for a diet partner...wanna start a thread?

Sarita
03-28-2006, 12:52 AM
Carole- I ate loads of celery and carrot sticks to avoid the weight issue. I also pushed my jogging routine up a little more every day. (This was more than 10 years ago when I was running track in high school.) It felt so good to be able to take a deep breath.

Keep up the good work, Girly!

Carole
03-28-2006, 02:22 AM
go Ahead and quit. Yell at me if you need to. I've never smoked...(tobbaco)

heh heh heh

Hey I'm looking for a diet partner...wanna start a thread?
Yes Ma'am!! I'll let you start that one. I am having the most insanely ridiculously terrific results with the Future Gym program. Unreal.

Billytwice
03-28-2006, 03:00 AM
?

Kida Adelyne
03-28-2006, 03:06 AM
Think I'll give you a big star for day two!

:Sun::Sun:

Way to go!

Carole
03-29-2006, 02:48 AM
Holy CARP. Well, I haven't killed anyone yet. AND I have only cheated...well, a couple times.

This is way harder than I thought. But I am drinking a LOT of water. I find that I am getting really nervous sometimes. That sucks.

Perks
03-29-2006, 02:57 AM
Go Carole! I've heard these first few days are the worst. Great job!

trumancoyote
03-29-2006, 03:03 AM
You should start smoking, Perks.

You'd be a cute smoker.

Perks
03-29-2006, 03:08 AM
That's not one I've ever heard before. You just want to corrupt me.

poetinahat
03-29-2006, 03:13 AM
You should start smoking, Perks.

You'd be a cute smoker.
Wrong thread, man! There's people here jonesing!
You're not wrong. But there's a queue, mate. Wait your turn!

Bloody Jeremy Irons in Brideshead Revisited is to blame for my habit. To quit, I had to admit I wasn't Jeremy Irons, and I didn't live in Brideshead. It was a sad, sad day.

trumancoyote
03-29-2006, 03:16 AM
That's not one I've ever heard before. You just want to corrupt me.

That, and it would complete the femme fatale image that I'm building up around you.

You'll need a whip as well.

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y141/miagikun/CatwomanMe.jpg

Perks
03-29-2006, 03:43 AM
What are you doing, Zach? No one's going to buy me wielding a whip with a cigarette hanging in the corner of my mouth.

trumancoyote
03-29-2006, 04:08 AM
I'm playing Catwoman with kelp on the beach.

And I'll buy it. No one else matters :)

Perks
03-29-2006, 04:12 AM
Wait... is that just you that matters? Or you and me?

(We need to give them back their thread - you troublemaker.)

trumancoyote
03-29-2006, 04:17 AM
Why, you and me, of course.

I'm sorry for hijackin'. I just wanted to give Carole something to read and giggle at instead of indulging in another scrumptious, oh-so-satisfactory and life-giving, love-of-my-life, god I love cigarettes, cigarette.

Carole
03-29-2006, 04:40 AM
Sweet Thing, you are EVIL. And you must be destroyed!

Perks
03-29-2006, 04:45 AM
God, Zach. You are gonna burn. Carole, pay no attention to his majesty. He's dropped his basket.

Carole
03-29-2006, 04:55 AM
~laughing~

We only keep him around for the nifty entertainment value, anyway.

By the way, oh cigarette king - if you keep playing mean, *I* won't talk magick with you. So THERE! http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/tongue.gif

JennaGlatzer
03-29-2006, 08:54 AM
Way to go, Carole! Now cut out the cheating.

I've been good since Jan. 15th. I used the patch for about 2 weeks-- but I "started" on step 3. I had used the patch once before and had heart racing symptoms, so I used the mildest dose this time. I think it helped me with the suckiest part, though it still sucked. It's easier now, though it's not over yet.

I've gained a few pounds, but I deserved to gain them-- I've eaten about a pool-full of cashews, along with several boxes of chocolatey goodness, including Boston Market brownies, cookies, Kit Kats, etc. Didn't kill anyone.

writerterri
03-29-2006, 09:00 AM
Jenna- that's evil food!


Send the left overs my way?



Wait until you get pregnant. Food never tasted so good.

Carole
03-29-2006, 03:09 PM
I've eaten about a pool-full of cashews, along with several boxes of chocolatey goodness, including Boston Market brownies, cookies, Kit Kats, etc. Didn't kill anyone.
*Homer Simpson-esque drooooool*

jenngreenleaf
03-29-2006, 06:00 PM
This thread is turning into SUCH a GREAT resource!!

:hooray::hooray::hooray::hooray::hooray:

Congratulations on everything! This is such a hard thing to accomplish and you're doing SO well!!

:hooray::hooray::hooray::hooray::hooray:

writerterri
03-29-2006, 08:11 PM
*sending fresh air to Carole today*

Jean Marie
03-29-2006, 10:57 PM
Jenna, here's a shortcut--get some chocolate covered cashews http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/smile.gif Yummy! Want me to send you some? My 2 favorite foods. Look at this way, at least you're not smoking. Right? Right.

Carole--quit cheatin', will ya http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/tongue.gif Hey, congratulations! You're correct, quitting smoking is the hardest thing to do. Ever. Even though it's been 14 years, every once in a while, I still think it would be cool to have one. Granted, the thought only lasts for a nano-second. Besides, I can't stand the smell, so it's a moot point anyway.

OneTeam OneDream
04-23-2006, 03:32 AM
So Carole, how's the quitting going?

StoryG27
04-23-2006, 04:59 AM
Carole, I wish you the best of luck.

As you know, I quit...but what you don't know is that I started again. I went cold turkey, no cheating, not one single drag of a cigarette for just over three months, but the stress got too high (plus I gained weight) and I started again. Be stronger than me, please. I can't say I regret starting again because I picked a really stupid time to try to quit, otherwise I do think I'd be disappointed in myself. I dunno, as for now, I've kind of resigned myself to being a smoker, and trust me, that's not what you really want, right? Just do the best you can and you'll get to that 'non-smoker' status eventually.

Carole
04-23-2006, 03:45 PM
Ok, time for me to fess up too. I started again. Please, no throwing tomatoes. I really do want to quit. I guess I just don't want it bad enough. Plus, with Daniel and Seth's step-momster and all that is going on, it was pretty easy to pick them back up to help deal with the stress.

Good Word
04-23-2006, 10:44 PM
I used to smoke and still crave it sometimes--usually only if I have had more than one alcoholic drink--otherwise I can't stand the smell on my fingers, my clothes, etc. I have had one cigarette this year, and it was lousy.

I wish my best friend's father would have quit some time ago. Even when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer he didn't quit. And he was lucky to bounce back.

But he's in surgery right now, as I write this. A biopsy on his lung didn't go well because his lungs are so damaged from smoking that they couldn't handle the little prick of the biopsy needle and they had to go in and stop it up. He wouldn't have needed the biopsy at all, most likely if he wasn't such a heavy smoker for so long. Smoking is killing him while his family gets to watch.

I hope I quit in time for any permanent damage. I figure I've smoked about 2-3 packs total since I was 38. I'm 41 now.

SpookyWriter
04-23-2006, 10:53 PM
Ok, time for me to fess up too. I started again. Please, no throwing tomatoes. I really do want to quit. I guess I just don't want it bad enough. Plus, with Daniel and Seth's step-momster and all that is going on, it was pretty easy to pick them back up to help deal with the stress.Well I never like to quit, so until they pull my left lung out I will probably continue to smoke. Besides, doesn't my pic say it all?

Carole
12-06-2006, 04:36 AM
Guess what. I'm trying again. This time, with ammunition.

I went to the doctor this morning. I've had a weird "thing" on my neck for about a year. After hearing about a girl who does contract work for my office who is dying of cancer, I bit the bullet and went to the doctor. I was going to go Friday, but I decided that if I waited that long I'd lose my nerve.

So I visited the nice lady doctor. She said the words I hoped she would. It's a lipoma. Almost positive. She's sending me to an ear, nose & throat doc for confirmation, but she also said that if she had any real doubt, she would have sent me directly to an oncologist. I'm spooked about sounding so confident before the other doctor examines me, but supposedly it is not sympomatic of the "C" word.

My lungs are clear. Amazing. Shocking, really. The thing on my neck is very small. I had to show her where it was. So now what do I do?

I decided that if I got a clean bill of health, this would be a changing point. I decided that I wouldn't say to myself, "Whew! That was close! I can keep what I'm doing and not die!" Nope. I decided that it's time for a change.

I never wanted to be all wrinkly before my time and have a voice like Selma on the Simpsons anyway :)

So now I have a prescription for Wellbutrin. Supposedly weight loss is a side effect. Oh darn.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
12-06-2006, 04:48 AM
I never wanted to be all wrinkly before my time and have a voice like Selma on the Simpsons anyway :)

I think I've said this before, but my best girlfriend for the last 30 or so years died of lung cancer when she was 47. Had never been so thin in her life.

Good luck, Carole. I'm glad you're trying again before you lose weight the way Beth did.

CBeasy
12-06-2006, 05:30 AM
Good luck on your second try Carole! I'm wishing you luck despite the fact that it was somehow reassuring to meet another pagan smoker. For some reason, every non-pagan I know thinks that it's somehow hypocritical to be pagan and a smoker, though I don't really see the connection. I haven't really been smoking that long, I starting smoking during what I like to call my "Partying Years" because it's a really fun thing to do socially, especially when you're already intoxicated. Now I smoke generally for a distraction or as you said earlier, something to cheer me up when I'm unhappy or angry. I think it'd be really hard for me to quit because I do it so much at work. The amount of cigarettes I smoke is directly proportional to the amount of hours I'm working. Cigarettes are something for me to look forward to at work. Whenever I think to myself "I really wish I was at home" I just have a cigarette and think "Well, I least I can smoke a nice cigarette!". As for the idea if sitting and contemplating the cigarette, that wouldn't help me either. See, I actually do that sometimes, because I love smoking so much that I enjoy focusing on smoking. Plus, I have an addictive personality. I basically become addicted to anything I really enjoy, even if it's something that's not physically addictive. If it actually is, I'm totally screwed. Still, I don't think it's a lost cause, I've quit far worse things then nicotine. I hope the best for you Carole. It's going to be hard, but you can do it.

TsukiRyoko
12-06-2006, 06:39 AM
Gaining weight after you quit smoking is purely a psychological phenomena, started as a promotional tactic back in the 40's and 50's. "Smoke and you'll lose weight!" They'd say, giving off the impression that quiiting smoking would do the opposite. None of it's true, it's all psychological.

Now, as for the tearing someone's head off.... Erm, that one is not quite as psychological. Sure, there are things to do to help prevent it. keep yourself busy, take up hobbies, go see a movie, anything. But, you'll still feel irritable at times. Luckily, the urges only last a few minutes, so if you can hold on through that, you should be good. :D Good luck!

kikazaru
12-06-2006, 06:44 AM
My husband quit smoking about a month and a half ago. He didn't use patches, gum or prescriptions, he read a book I bought him called "The Easy Way to Quit Smoking" by Allan Carr. He said it was very odd because it just made so much sense to him that it was not difficult for him to quit (he's tried before and never made it past 3 days because he was a hard core smoker - sitting outside in -45 for his nic fix). There are a lot of reviews on Amazon if you want to read what people said.

In any case I congratulate you Carole for taking care of yourself. The best of luck to you.

Mom'sWrite
12-06-2006, 07:14 AM
Good luck Carole! You can do it this time. I was at a carton a week habit until I woke up one morning hung over in the worst way from too much drinking AND smoking. The taste in my mouth could not be described in gentle terms. I quit right then. Never had another cigarette. Not one, not ever. That feeling, that taste, that moment was all the leverage I needed to leave it forever.

Get your leverage and use it. Leverage doesn't make you fat, it just makes you powerful.

kristie911
12-06-2006, 07:14 AM
I quit smoking 2 weeks ago. The first day was the worst...all I could think of was cigarettes. By the third day I was doing much better. Now they barely cross my mind. I did chew the gum for the first 5 days, but only a couple pieces a day, just so I didn't kill someone. I did get a little bitchy from time to time.

And even if you do gain a couple of pounds, just think how much more enjoyable working out will be once you can breathe again! :D

Good luck, Carole! You can do it!

Bmwhtly
12-06-2006, 01:35 PM
Is is possible to quit smoking and NOT get fat...and NOT kill everyone you know?*shrugs* I guess you could. Why would you want to.

truelyana
12-06-2006, 03:38 PM
Anything is possible, afterall its all down to you. Thats the beauty of choice. :) Have you ever thought of stepping back, from the overall picture and looking at it from the thought process of it instead? ... cause if you think about it, smoking is not really part of you. You just get into it out of habit, and its like a thought loop continouing ever so, until you realise it.

illiterwrite
12-06-2006, 04:30 PM
Gaining weight after you quit smoking is purely a psychological phenomena, started as a promotional tactic back in the 40's and 50's. "Smoke and you'll lose weight!" They'd say, giving off the impression that quiiting smoking would do the opposite. None of it's true, it's all psychological.


It's not psychological. Sure, not everyone gains weight. But a lot of smokers (not all, but a lot) replace the act of smoking with some other oral activity (yeah, I know, no smart ass comments please). Eating keeps your hands and mouth occupied.

Good luck, Carole. It's so tough. I've tried every method, and the only thing that worked for me was getting pregnant. Even then, I quit for almost two years and then started again after one innocent patio lunch with some wine.

Just remember that the cravings don't last forever, and they get less frequent as time passes. Drink lots of water. The actual nicotine is out of your system within 3 days, and the rest is then just staying quit (the hardest part).

TsukiRyoko
12-06-2006, 04:40 PM
It's not psychological. Sure, not everyone gains weight. But a lot of smokers (not all, but a lot) replace the act of smoking with some other oral activity (yeah, I know, no smart ass comments please). Eating keeps your hands and mouth occupied.

Good luck, Carole. It's so tough. I've tried every method, and the only thing that worked for me was getting pregnant. Even then, I quit for almost two years and then started again after one innocent patio lunch with some wine.

Just remember that the cravings don't last forever, and they get less frequent as time passes. Drink lots of water. The actual nicotine is out of your system within 3 days, and the rest is then just staying quit (the hardest part).

Yes, people trying to quit smoking need some sort of oral fixation, which can conclude that they eat more. But it still counts as psychological. You could replace the fixation with food, but you can also replace it with chewing gum, biting fingernails, chewing your tongue, gnawing a pen, or absolutely nothing at all.

Yes, Carole drink lots of water and take lots of showers. I'm not entirely sure why it works (maybe the nicotine comes out of your skin, or the fluids wash it out or something? not entirely sure) but it does. I quit smoking for about 7 months, then started up again. Illiterwrite is correct, resisting the temptation to smoke is the hardest part, so tell all your smoking friends to buzz off for a while.

C.bronco
12-06-2006, 05:46 PM
Start jogging when you quit smoking. If you really want to quit, you'll do it. The patch helps a bit, but your motivation is what matters most. I quit to get pregnant -huge motivator and more at stake than me.
Stay away from sharp objects. I came close to strangling a friend with a bungee chord, so avoid those too. Keep yourself very busy and you'll be allright.

Rane
12-07-2006, 05:30 AM
Good luck! I quit smoking 3 months ago. I allowed myself to gain 10 pounds and then I went on a diet. My food addiction was worse than the nicotine. I was crabby because I was hungry, and that took my mind off of smoking.

As far as the smoking went, the worst part for me was when I drove my car because that's where I mostly smoked. So when I quit, I bought Bubble Yum and would cram two pieces in my mouth right before I got in my car. My mouth was so full with the gum on the ride home that I didn't even think about smoking.

I hope it goes well for you. :)

WerenCole
12-07-2006, 05:50 AM
I have a prescription for a nicotine inhibitor if I ever choose to use it. . . it does cost quite a bit but I am told it works well.

If you choose that route, let me know how it goes.

Also. . .Ms. Ryoko, from what I have heard, cigarettes are an appetite suppressant and from experience I know this to be true. I have lived for weeks on little else but cigarettes and water. . . the cigs keep the appetite down while I fill up on water so as to not feel hungry. Pathetic yes, but what else can a starving young bachelor do in times of trouble?

Write_At_1st_Light
12-07-2006, 05:52 AM
You could think in reverse.

Set everything else on fire, while you stay in the shower. Then build a new house, move in and you'll be cured of the smokerinos!

Carole
12-10-2006, 01:25 AM
Today is day-one taking Wellbutrin. So far, so good. It was a little bit of a fiasco at first. I took the Rx to Walgreens and the girl told me that my co-pay was $50. That made me mad.

I took the Rx back to the doctor and asked for something I could get in generic. They gave me a totally different prescription, one I had never heard of before. I took it back to Walgreens and she told me it would make me sleepy. Back to the doctor. I asked for my original Rx back again, thinking I would suck it up and pay the $50, but they wrote me one for a different kind of Wellbutrin instead. I seems that you can't get generic in the 24 hour release, but you CAN get generic in the 12 hour release. So off I went again with another Wellbutrin Rx. My co-pay was only $10 on that one. MUCH better.

I took the first dose as son as I got home. So far, all I am noticing is that my mind is extremely calm. Usually I am thinking about cleaning the kitchen, doing some laundry, making the beds, scrubbing the bathtub, vacuuming, walking the dog, and so on, constantly. My body just can't keep up with my brain and i end up jittery. Right now I am in an upbeat mood, but I am not wacked out trying to do a million things at once.

The other thing I am noticing is that I have no appetite. None at all. I've had a couple of cups of coffee today, but I have no interest in anything to eat.

Carole
12-10-2006, 06:56 PM
Day two - same, same.