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View Full Version : Help me decide if I should take this job!!!


Jaycinth
03-08-2006, 09:33 PM
I'm thinking over this job offer. The reasons to take it equal the reasons not to. 7 hour day instead of 8 hour day. But an extra 25 to 40 min of travel each way so the time saved is negated, and worse if there is a problem in the commute.

Also, there is the travel cost. I drive 4 miles each way now, and I can walk if my car dies. If I take this job, the drive would be an hour at best. Public transportation would get me there in 25 to 40 min but it would cost me $34.50 per week and the company only reimburses $60.00 a month. So I would be spending an extra $1,000. a year in commuting.) More money RIGHT NOW... but I'll get that with my next raise. Same Health insurance. The accounting department is royally messed up so I'd have a lot to post in the HOH. But do I really feel like being hateful?

I'd have the same autonomy as I have here. It is a family owned business...the same as here. The children are curently training to take over from dad...same as here...but their dad is younger than this dad.

The job is in Downtown Washington D.C. (nuff said) Right now I work in the burbs and my office window overlooks a park with animals and a stream. The woods provide a buffer from traffic noise, walking around at lunch time is pleasant. I don't know if I WANT to stroll around K street at lunch time...do you KNOW how many PEOPLE are down there?

I might meet a nice guy if I work in a larger building with more people. But why would I want to do that when I've just been stompped on?

I can wear dress jeans to work. But when my boss is out of town, I can wear dress jeans to work, as long as I don't wear sneaks and i do wear a 'business' jacket.

I have time to post on AW during breaks. Dunno about the new place, but chances are it is so messed up, no one here will 'see' me for months.
But I can always post at night. But I write at night. But I don't write every night.

I can get from work to my daughter's school in 10 min flat. I can get from work to my Dr. or dentist or optometrist in 10 min flat. I can get home in 10 min flat. That means I can run to the school, dr or whatever, on my lunch break, and still get back to work to finish the day, maybe losing an hour at most. New Job...even an 8:30 am Dr appointment will have me at work at 11:00. If daughter gets sick at school, it will take me 45 min to get there.

It IS a nice company. This IS a nice company.

The clincher is, If I quit and go, I lose 3 weeks of vacation that I NEED for sanity's sake. That means working for 17 months before I am eligible for vacation, and it would be at entry level ( i/e 1 week as opposed to 3)

So Is $7,000. more per year NOW ( actually netting the travel costs $6,000 more per year.) worth giving up any vacation except federal holidays until July of 2007, when I expect to get a $5,000. raise in January?

Also I have a lot of drama in my life now. My current boss knows this and we are working around it. How to explain to a new boss?

What should I do? I was planning on putting my resume out there right after I take my vacation, any way...but that was right after, not NOW. (If I could quit and write full time I would.)

What should I do? I'll be hiding under my desk waiting for advice.

Lyra Jean
03-08-2006, 09:44 PM
Stay at your current job. If you can tell the new place you can start working there after you come back from vacation (ya know just tell him I can start working at X date).

That's what I would do anyway. Why create more stress for yourself when you know you couldn't handle it right now. I hope everything works out for you.

mdin
03-08-2006, 09:46 PM
The job is in Downtown Washington D.C. (nuff said)

Only you know the true answer, but that alone would be enough for me to keep my current job. Are you sure about your commute time, even during rush hour?

NeuroFizz
03-08-2006, 09:47 PM
Hi, Jay

My gut reaction, based on the balance of provided information, is to stay. The way you wrote this, with the description of the scenery at the present job, the way you've described the details, seems to suggest you are leaning in this direction as well. Change for change's sake is usually not a good idea, and unless there are significant long-term advantages for the move, it doesn't seem like a clear winner.

eldragon
03-08-2006, 09:49 PM
From what you've said..........I choose stay.

Yeshanu
03-08-2006, 11:43 PM
Jaycinth,

Sometimes writing things out helps in decision-making. Re-read what you've posted, and I think you'll see clearly why we're all saying, "Stay at your current job."

The only real positives to the new job that you've listed are the pay raise (which will be cancelled out when you receive a raise at your current job) and the possibility of meeting more men.

That's cancelled out by the negatives of the new job, most notably the commute and lack of vacations. The extra $1000 you'd be netting per year (calculated after your raise at the current job, and note, that's assuming no increase in taxes due to the higher salary) ain't worth the hassle.

Fern
03-08-2006, 11:56 PM
I think you've answered your own question. I vote for stay.

AdamH
03-09-2006, 12:09 AM
I say stay. The extra benefits of the new job aren't worth the extra troubles you'll be going through (commuting, emergencies, vacation time, ect).

Also, someone told me once that if you have any doubts at all, you probably shouldn't. There's a reason for those doubts. If it was something you really wanted to do, you wouldn't even need to ask.

Maryn
03-09-2006, 12:52 AM
I made myself make a decision before I read anyone else's call.

It's unanimous.

Maryn, too easily influenced

Cheryll
03-09-2006, 01:01 AM
I think you already know the answer. ;) Good luck to you.

Cheryll

Unique
03-09-2006, 01:01 AM
Stay.

Unless you get a job offer down here....

Better the devil you know than the one you don't know.
Besides, who'll rant in the HOH if you get happy all of a sudden?

mattwaterman
03-09-2006, 01:11 AM
Better the devil you know than the one you don't know.
Besides, who'll rant in the HOH if you get happy all of a sudden?

Agree. As someone also doing some job searching (hope none of you work with me ;)) I think the absolute most important criteria is whether you will like the actual work. Assuming that you can tolerate your current place, that's better than 75% of America who despise their job...

Shadow_Ferret
03-09-2006, 01:27 AM
I hate long commutes.


I like forests and critters.


I like being close to my kids, their school, their doctor.

You won't meet any nice guys in an office building in Washington, D.C. (OK, I made that part up.)

P.H.Delarran
03-09-2006, 01:34 AM
$6K a year is only $200 a month. Is that enough to compensate for the agony of a long commute, the inconvenince of not being near enough to your daughter to run errands, planned or emergency,(don't forget to factor in the loss of pay this will induce, not to mention added stress), loss of a view, which could affect both creativity and productivity, and the stress of making such a change? What life improvement will you make with that money?
You sound happy in your current job, so you may want to ask yourself why you looked for something else in the first place. If the motivation is money, perhaps you can ask for some of that raise sooner than next January. You mentioned drama in your life, perhaps the thought of a change seems appealing as a coping factor, but wouldn't it just add additional stress, and drama, to your life?
Like others have pointed out, the wording of you post suggests that you already know what you should do.
Good luck to you no matter what the decision.

Jcomp
03-09-2006, 01:59 AM
Your current job is singing to you and it's saying...

"Babe, I love you so... and I want you to know. That I'm, gonna miss your love... the minute, you walk out that door. Please don't go... Don't goooooooo!"

And your job sings like Teddy Pendergrass in his prime....

threedogpeople
03-09-2006, 02:05 AM
As someone who has more years of human resources experience than I care to remember, I also say "stay". There are lots and lots of unknowns with ANY new job (remember, what people tell your during an interview can be much different than the reality of working day after day).

If you are going to leave a job that isn't making you miserable then make sure and find one that is your dream job or fulfills at least one of your goals for the next step of your career.

If money is the issue I suggest that you look at this from a "what the market is paying" perspective. Gather some information on what people in comparable jobs are being paid, then you have some ammunition (aka hard data) to use to speak with your boss about money. Headhunters can be a great source for this information, as can the local human resources group (SHRM).

Start a file on yourself (I called mine the "I" file) - include things "I" did well, compliments "I've" gotten from the boss, compliments "I've" gotten from my co-workers, customers, etc. When it comes time for salary reviews then you will be ready to back up your request for more money with something more substantial than "I want it", "I need it", "I think I deserve it".

Hope this gives you some ideas - if you want to chat more, send me an email.

Judy

SC Harrison
03-09-2006, 02:11 AM
$6K a year is only $200 a month.

It's actually $500 a month, before Uncle Sam takes his chunk, but it will still end up being "not enough" to justify/cover other costs. I vote to stay, but the searching should still continue, albeit covertly.

oswann
03-09-2006, 05:59 AM
Money is the worst reason to change jobs. Look at the possibility of renegociating your salary where you are and use the job offer as a premise to go to the table to get a raise. No one likes doing it, but you shouldn't hesitate.

Os.

September skies
03-09-2006, 06:53 AM
Stay at your present job. You can't put a price on being nearby for children and on the tranquility and peace your current job offers by the setting it is in.
I read your post twice and it read "STAY" over and over. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/smile.gif

Ol' Fashioned Girl
03-09-2006, 09:57 AM
Another past human resources professional weighing in here: Stay. For all the reasons above.

Unique
03-09-2006, 02:55 PM
You won't meet any nice guys in an office building in Washington, D.C. (OK, I made that part up.)

ahem. You may have been correct, shadow.

lobbyists, politicians, and lawyers - DC is full of them....unless she's looking for target practice, of course.

scfirenice
03-09-2006, 07:13 PM
I agree with most of the posters above. Stay. There is too much crap going on to switch jobs right now. PLUS you know you'd miss the cars driving on the geico building and all the deer that come to visit. Change later when things cool down. I bet you'll get an even BETTER offer if you wait.

Jaycinth
03-09-2006, 08:50 PM
I still don't know what to do. I'll be doing the same thing (accounting) no matter where I go. I just don't love accounting. But it pays the bills, people tell me I'm good at it, and many times I can put my brain on auto pilot and think creative thoughts.

Part of my 'family and friends' group keeps trying to impress on me that I should jump on the upward career track and go for more money, because 'writing' is just a 'hobby' and since I am not Dan Brown (last year I was NOT J.K. Rowling and for 3 years running before that, I was NOT Stephen King) I should forget it and tke the job and build up some savings so I can do something with it and I'll have plenty of time to write after I retire.

I did not go out and look for this job! Nope! This is one of those job leads I got from a friend who wants me to do it, because she thinks I am organized and bright, and having me there will make her job 1,000 times easier. ( we've worked together before.) I feel like I'll let her down if I don't go in and say yes. She's talked me up to her boss.

I was planning to look for something else beginning in August, anyway, after I'd taken my vacation.

The money IS a nice thought. It dances in my brain! My daughter is capable of starting dinner on her own, and until he transfers to another University, my son is home 3 days of the week when she gets home from school.

The cat don't care, as long as he can climb on my shoulder when I get home, he's PURRRRRfect with anything!

So I'm making this decision based on if I want to stand in a crowded subway car 80 min a day ( chances of a seat are slimmy slim slim so there go the chances for reading and writing) and on if $134.62 a week BEFORE taxes is worth giving up vacation leave....Hmmm more figures If I go, I make $134 more a week. But if I go, for the first year, everytime I take off a day unpaid I lose $200.00, so for every day I take off for mental health (writing), I have to work 2 weeks to make it up.

So I guess the question is 'Money or my Soul'?

threedogpeople
03-09-2006, 09:14 PM
I didn't answer one of your questions earlier - I successfully negotiated for more vacation time before I took my last 4 jobs.

If they say that they can't do that then you can counter with - How about a sign-on bonus, payable half at 6 months and the other half at 12 months and the 3rd week of vacation "unpaid".

When faced with having to continue a candidate search, many companies are very flexible.

Judy

P.H.Delarran
03-09-2006, 09:19 PM
It's actually $500 a month, before Uncle Sam takes his chunk, but it will still end up being "not enough" to justify/cover other costs. I vote to stay, but the searching should still continue, albeit covertly.

oh man..where was my head?? so much for that argument!

Shadow_Ferret
03-09-2006, 09:30 PM
Money or soul?

Have you mentioned to your present boss that you have this other offer to see if he counter-offers?

Vanessa
03-09-2006, 09:35 PM
I'm gonna go with the majority here. I'd stay with the current job.

Unique
03-09-2006, 11:10 PM
since it will only make her job easier...
and your life harder.

Commuting sucks.

Yeshanu
03-12-2006, 06:06 AM
I still don't know what to do. I'll be doing the same thing (accounting) no matter where I go. I just don't love accounting. But it pays the bills, people tell me I'm good at it, and many times I can put my brain on auto pilot and think creative thoughts.

Part of my 'family and friends' group keeps trying to impress on me that I should jump on the upward career track and go for more money, because 'writing' is just a 'hobby' and since I am not Dan Brown (last year I was NOT J.K. Rowling and for 3 years running before that, I was NOT Stephen King) I should forget it and tke the job and build up some savings so I can do something with it and I'll have plenty of time to write after I retire.

I did not go out and look for this job! Nope! This is one of those job leads I got from a friend who wants me to do it, because she thinks I am organized and bright, and having me there will make her job 1,000 times easier. ( we've worked together before.) I feel like I'll let her down if I don't go in and say yes. She's talked me up to her boss.


Jaycinth,

You should never, ever do something as important as quit one job to start another because someone else wants you to do it. Nor should you feel that you've let your friend down if you refuse the job. If you decide in the end you don't want the job, just tell her that you're very grateful that she has such confidence in your skills, but that the positives of working for her company weren't outweighing the negatives of lack of vacation and increased travel time.

As for the writing: If that's what you eventually see yourself doing, then go for it! All the more, then, I'd say stay, because eighty minutes a day spent standing on a subway train is eighty minutes a day not spent writing. (Big Parenting Secret: Your daughter can still learn to start the supper on her own, even if you're home. ;) )

Tell those relative-type people to butt out of your life. (Nicely, of course.) No, of course you're not Dan Brown, but then neither is JK Rowling or Stephen King. You're Jaycinth, and you'll find your own way to the top of the writing jungle.

Why were you planning to look for another job after your vacation? If it's because you're bored where you are, then chances are another job in the same field will only leave you bored again, once you get used to the new environment. And the extra travel time will leave you feeling stressed.

Whatever you do, don't spend most of your life doing something you dislike simply to pay the bills, thinking that you'll be able to do it after you retire. My FIL and MIL had big plans for retirement, and he was even going to retire five years early, at age sixty. He died of pneumonia contracted in a work environment, aged fifty-nine.

Forget the money. There isn't enough money in the world to replace the time and the hapiness you'd lose by doing something you dislike for most of your waking hours.

kikazaru
03-12-2006, 07:06 AM
There doesn't seem like there are enough positives in the position your friend wants you to take, to override the many negatives you've outlined.

Imo the job would have to be really wonderful and a unique opportunity, with a huge increase in salary to outweigh the enormous drawback of commuting. This job sounds like it would at most, be a lateral move, rather than a step up, which in the scheme of things is rather unnecessary, given the fact that you don't dislike your current position.

In addition, taking a job to please a friend is just a recipe for unhappiness and almost certainly to cause a rift in your friendship. If there is nothing much to wow you about this position then it seems pointless to go for it imo.

Anya Smith
03-12-2006, 07:10 AM
IMHO, stay where you are.

Anya