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View Full Version : Romney's tone deaf, example #999


ColoradoGuy
03-29-2012, 03:19 AM
In an interview (http://www.jsonline.com/blogs/news/144683485.html) he related an oh-so-funny story about his connection with Wisconsin, where he is currently campaigning, apparently remotely by telephone:

“One of most humorous I think relates to my father. You may remember my father, George Romney, was president of an automobile company called American Motors … They had a factory in Michigan, and they had a factory in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and another one in Milwaukee, Wisconsin,” said Romney. “And as the president of the company he decided to close the factory in Michigan and move all the production to Wisconsin. Now later he decided to run for governor of Michigan and so you can imagine that having closed the factory and moved all the production to Wisconsin was a very sensitive issue to him, for his campaign.”

Romney said he recalled a parade in which the school band marching with his father’s campaign only knew the Wisconsin fight song, not the Michigan song.

“So every time they would start playing ‘On, Wisconsin, On, Wisconsin,’ my dad’s political people would jump up and down and try to get them to stop, because they didn’t want people in Michigan to be reminded that my dad had moved production to Wisconsin,” said Romney, laughing.


Whatever the business merits or not of that decision, Romney's handlers really ought to get their guy a muzzle.

blacbird
03-29-2012, 03:27 AM
What's the matter with you, Colorado? You have a problem with a guy humored about cutting lots of jobs?

caw

Alessandra Kelley
03-29-2012, 03:39 AM
Perhaps Romney thinks people don't talk to each other. Or maybe he's stuck in the early eighteenth century, when a Massachusettser would never trust a New Hampshireman. In that world, outside of Michigan nobody cares about Michiganders, and Coloradoans are complacent as long as Colorado gets jobs.

TerzaRima
03-29-2012, 03:40 AM
Weird, I actually was just coming here to post that. Yuk yuk! Hey, remember that time Dad laid off a bunch of folks so they had no livelihood? Ow, ow, my sides.

MacAllister
03-29-2012, 03:47 AM
Yeah. And the hits just keep coming.

Romney with Jay Leno talking about Health Insurance (http://www.boston.com/Boston/politicalintelligence/2012/03/mitt-romney-jay-leno-discuss-health-care-responsibilities/qU31mD6xIWAKAjxOwjn43L/index.html):
“People with preexisting conditions — as long as they’ve been insured before, they’re going to continue to have insurance,” Romney said on NBC’s “Tonight Show.”

But, Leno asked, what if they haven’t been insured?

“Well, if they’re 45 years old, and they show up, and say, I want insurance because I’ve got a heart disease, it’s like, `Hey guys, we can’t play the game like that,’” Romney answered. “You’ve got to get insurance when you’re well, and if you get ill, then you’re going to be covered.”

The exchange highlighted a challenge for Romney as seeks to capitalize on the controversy over President Obama’s health care law, which is currently before the Supreme Court. As a whole, the law is unpopular with the American public. But the component that bars health insurance companies from denying coverage to those with preexisting conditions is favored by the vast majority of Americans – 85 percent in a recent New York Times/CBS News poll.

Romney, who wants to repeal the federal health care law, has said he would replace it with a new law. Among the components of the new law, Romney says, would be not allowing insurance companies to deny coverage because of a preexisting condition. But Romney would only allow this for those who have been continuously insured for a fixed period of time. Romney has not specified the period of time someone would need to be insured in order to qualify.

Alessandra Kelley
03-29-2012, 03:50 AM
It sounds like one of those hee-hee-don't-give-the-game-away kinds of jokes the privileged tell each other in private. I can really see it.

Devil Ledbetter
03-29-2012, 03:53 AM
You may remember my father, George Romney, was president of an automobile company called American Motors … They had a factory in Michigan, and they had a factory in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and another one in Milwaukee, Wisconsin,” said Romney. “And as the president of the company he decided to close the factory in Michigan and move all the production to Wisconsin.And I'm sure everyone can relate to having a father who is president of American Motors.:tongue

Those were dogshit cars, btw.

Chrissy
03-29-2012, 04:00 AM
Romney, who wants to repeal the federal health care law, has said he would replace it with a new law. Among the components of the new law, Romney says, would be (1) not allowing insurance companies to deny coverage because of a preexisting condition. But Romney would (2) only allow this for those who have been continuously insured for a fixed period of time. Romney has not specified the period of time someone would need to be insured in order to qualify.


What the.... am I missing something here? Doesn't (2) cancel out (1)?

What do you call that? An oxymoron, right? Or maybe just a moron.

rugcat
03-29-2012, 04:06 AM
Among the components of the new law, Romney says, would be not allowing insurance companies to deny coverage because of a preexisting condition. But Romney would only allow this for those who have been continuously insured for a fixed period of time. So they cannot deny coverage for pre existing conditions -- unless you're trying to get insurance, in which case, they can. Not sure how that works.

I guess it means they can't actually boot you to the curb if you purchase insurance while healthy and then later discover you have cancer -- you know, the reason you got the insurance in the first place.

Hell of a deal.

Alessandra Kelley
03-29-2012, 04:14 AM
What the.... am I missing something here? Doesn't (2) cancel out (1)?

What do you call that? An oxymoron, right? Or maybe just a moron.

For many people, insurance policies are renewed with new terms every year. So if someone gets very ill during the year, when renewal time comes around the insurance company throws them out for having a pre-existing condition. It's like having a very short-term lease.

You can have been faithfully insured for twenty years or more, one year at a time, and still be at risk of being cut off just when you need insurance most.

Perhaps those are the people Romney means.

Chrissy
03-29-2012, 04:27 AM
I see. Thanks for explaining. I honestly did not know that was a legal practice.

Although, now that I think about it, the same thing happened to me with homeowner's insurance. After they paid a claim, they booted me.

blacbird
03-29-2012, 06:28 AM
Oh, but wait: Just remember that your practical alternative, among Republicans, to Mitt Romney in this Presidential cycle, has now whittled down to Rick Santorum.

We're going to hear a lot more Mitt Romney humor in coming months. We ought to start collecting Mitt Romney jokes. I have one:

"Why did the chicken cross the road?"

"To look for a new job."

caw

Don
03-29-2012, 06:39 AM
"Why did the chicken cross the road?"

"She knew if Romney caught her, she'd end up in a kennel on the top of his car, flying down the highway at some gawdawful speed."

Gregg
03-29-2012, 07:38 AM
Oh, but wait: Just remember that your practical alternative, among Republicans, to Mitt Romney in this Presidential cycle, has now whittled down to Rick Santorum.

We're going to hear a lot more Mitt Romney humor in coming months. We ought to start collecting Mitt Romney jokes. I have one:

"Why did the chicken cross the road?"

"To look for a new job."

caw

Very possible that we'll have four or eight more years to make jokes about President Romney.

Nymtoc
03-29-2012, 07:42 AM
said Romney, laughing....



It's that patented laugh of his that merits analysis--
"Hah-hah-hah-hah!"
--which follows his most unfunny statements and which, I'm willing to bet, is electronically produced. ;)

Mclesh
03-29-2012, 07:43 AM
Once again, I feel so many emotions reading through this thread, I don't quite know what to say. The healthcare hits close to home, especially in Mac's quoted example of the 45 year old with no insurance.

Sometimes things aren't that simple. I lost my cousin, 45, a few months ago. He was working poor; had a full-time job but not enough to afford insurance. He relied on clinics for care. When he was ill, he was given antibiotics and sent home where he collapsed and was taken off life support the next day. I can't help but wonder if he'd still be around if he had decent medical care.

And the jobs -- well, that's just funny, isn't it? It's always fun when someone gets laid off and finds their job has traveled to another state. A real knee slapper.

blacbird
03-29-2012, 07:51 AM
Very possible that we'll have four or eight more years to make jokes about President Romney.

It's possible, sure. It's politics. External events can intrude. There's seven months to go. Your fondest wish may be granted.

The current situation:

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/epolls/2012/president/us/general_election_romney_vs_obama-1171.html

To quote former major league pitcher Joaquin Andujar, a minor rival of Yogi Berra for wonderful utterances, when interviewed after a game in which a very weird thing happened that allowed his team (St. Louis Cardinals) to eke out a miraculous win:

"You can sum up baseball in one word: You never know."

caw

ColoradoGuy
03-29-2012, 07:52 AM
Those were dogshit cars, btw.

My friend had a Gremlin. Now those were odd cars.

MacAllister
03-29-2012, 07:52 AM
I was just talking with a friend the other day about the Pike Place Market, where we've both worked in the past, and have a lot of mutual acquaintances.

It's been a really hard year at the Market, and a number of long-term vendors we both know have died this year, or been diagnosed with terminal illnesses. What do these folks have in common? They're all freelancers, artists, without regular healthcare. Without a primary physician. Without insurance. So when they get a heart disease or a stage 4 brain cancer diagnosis, it's because they finally collapsed somewhere and got rushed to the ER.

They were also, with a single exception, all under 60 years of age.

And under Romney's stated plan, we're all uninsurable.

Manuel Royal
03-29-2012, 07:53 AM
Sometimes things aren't that simple. I lost my cousin, 45, a few months ago. He was working poor; had a full-time job but not enough to afford insurance. He relied on clinics for care. When he was ill, he was given antibiotics and sent home where he collapsed and was taken off life support the next day. I can't help but wonder if he'd still be around if he had decent medical care.I'm sorry about your cousin. And hoping the same thing doesn't happen to me: a 51-year-old diabetic with no job and no insurance.

Until the relevant provision of Obamacare takes effect, nobody will sell me a policy even if I somehow had money for it. And under Richie R. Romney's plan, they'd still be able to turn me away because I wasn't continuously covered. (How the hell does he think he can sell that as a fair idea?)

Don't expect anything better from Santorum. But he will pray for you.

blacbird
03-29-2012, 08:02 AM
And I'm sure everyone can relate to having a father who is president of American Motors.:tongue

Those were dogshit cars, btw.

I had a Gremlin bck in the late 1970s/early 1980s. Before which, I had a Pacer.

They were what I could AFFORD. A word Mitt Romney has to look up in the OED.

Actually, now that I think about it, how much actual driving of a car has Mitt Romney actually done in his whole goram actual life? Assuming he has such a thing.

caw

clintl
03-29-2012, 08:10 AM
My friend had a Gremlin. Now those were odd cars.

I worked as a student engineer for a local utility that had bought a fleet of them when I was in college. They were so awful that people were trying to get them to break down so they'd get replaced with something decent. One of them stranded me on the freeway when I was on an errand downtown.

muravyets
03-29-2012, 08:19 AM
Very possible that we'll have four or eight more years to make jokes about President Romney.
He'll stop being funny long before then.

SirOtter
03-29-2012, 08:48 AM
And I'm sure everyone can relate to having a father who is president of American Motors.:tongue

Those were dogshit cars, btw.

Yep. I owned a Hornet. I will gladly testify that what Mitt's dad did to a fairly competent carmaker, Rambler, when he turned it into AMC is about what we could expect Mitt to do to the USA if and when he gets his, er, mitts on it.

I had a dream about Mitt the other night. He was selling name-brand, high quality refrigerators. The price was terrific, but he wouldn't deliver, and the deal was strictly cash-and-carry. What was I supposed to do, put the top down on my Mustang and drive the damn thing home sticking up over my trunk, held in by the seat belts? Again, typical of what we would go through under a Romney administration, methinks. A great deal that turns out to be the old bait-and-switch. Once again I am reluctantly condemned to voting Democrat.

muravyets
03-29-2012, 09:03 AM
Yep. I owned a Hornet. I will gladly testify that what Mitt's dad did to a fairly competent carmaker, Rambler, when he turned it into AMC is about what we could expect Mitt to do to the USA if and when he gets his, er, mitts on it.

I had a dream about Mitt the other night. He was selling name-brand, high quality refrigerators. The price was terrific, but he wouldn't deliver, and the deal was strictly cash-and-carry. What was I supposed to do, put the top down on my Mustang and drive the damn thing home sticking up over my trunk, held in by the seat belts? Again, typical of what we would go through under a Romney administration, methinks. A great deal that turns out to be the old bait-and-switch. Once again I am reluctantly condemned to voting Democrat.
Hopefully, if the GOP lose the general election soundly enough, the extremists will get mad and go form their own party, and then the Republicans can take their party back.

I remember when I used to vote a mixed ticket. It seems like another world.

Mclesh
03-29-2012, 09:03 AM
I'm sorry about your cousin. And hoping the same thing doesn't happen to me: a 51-year-old diabetic with no job and no insurance.

Until the relevant provision of Obamacare takes effect, nobody will sell me a policy even if I somehow had money for it. And under Richie R. Romney's plan, they'd still be able to turn me away because I wasn't continuously covered. (How the hell does he think he can sell that as a fair idea?)

Don't expect anything better from Santorum. But he will pray for you.

Man, I feel for you. I really do. I have a pre-existing condition, first diagnosed with breast cancer 12 years ago. I've been afraid of dropping or changing insurance since I knew I'd have a very difficult, if not impossible, time finding someone to insure me if I did. Luckily I've managed to squeak by (being self-employed all these years). Now, with a double mastectomy/reconstruction coming up in a few weeks, I'm covered and can't imagine what would have happened to me if I'd let my insurance lapse. My recurrence most likely wouldn't have been caught until it was at a much later stage.

This is an issue that people don't seem to really get unless they've experienced it themselves. Take care of yourself, Manuel.

rugcat
03-29-2012, 09:18 AM
This is an issue that people don't seem to really get unless they've experienced it themselves. Take care of yourself, Manuel.That sucks. I'm so sorry.

But this is what it comes down to: while men in suits argue before men (and women) in robes about the applicability of the commerce clause, and the importance of freedom, people all over the country are suffering and sometimes dying.

The amount of time, passion, money, and sheer effort that has gone into blocking health care for those who need it is simply astounding.

muravyets
03-29-2012, 09:22 AM
This is the part of the health care debate that depresses me - the blindness of those who fight over this issue to the reality of lives affected by it.

regdog
03-29-2012, 03:39 PM
Whatever the business merits or not of that decision, Romney's handlers really ought to get their guy a muzzle.


Well, given what his handlers have been known to say, Etch a Sketch (http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/election-2012/post/romney-adviser-campaign-is-like-an-etch-a-sketch/2012/03/21/gIQAcQ8pRS_blog.html). They might not be the best judges of what should and shouldn't be said.

RichardGarfinkle
03-29-2012, 03:44 PM
Romney strikes me as the kind of CEO mentality that cannot conceive of being wrong.

He talks like a tone deaf salesman and assumes that everyone will go along with him because his sales pitch can fool anyone.

He probably doesn't listen to his advisors.

MarkEsq
03-29-2012, 05:50 PM
This is the part of the health care debate that depresses me - the blindness of those who fight over this issue to the reality of lives affected by it.

And all of them are insured by the federal government. No irony there.

Monkey
03-29-2012, 06:41 PM
My father owned his own business. A computer repair shop in East Texas, in the same building as my mom's business, which was a pet store.

Because they were self-employed, their insurance was ridiculously expensive and covered little. Doctor's visits were only covered after a massive deductible.

As such, my dad didn't go to the doctor. Hell, he didn't like doctors much anyway.

I mentioned here on AW a few times that their businesses were getting broken into on a regular basis and the cops in their town weren't doing a damned thing about it. I wanted them to move here.

They did.

Unfortunately, getting their businesses up and running took longer than they planned. They dropped their expensive and nearly useless insurance. But then dad got sick...really sick. He finally agreed to let us take him in to the doctor.

Who recommended tests.

Who recommended a specialist.

Who had him admitted to the hospital when he came in for his results.

At the hospital, we learned that dad was suffering from what appeared to be stage 4 lung cancer...but it wasn't just in his lungs.

More tests. Expensive ones. And we learned that dad had a major mass and many smaller nodes in each lung. Cancer was in his kidneys, his liver, the lining of his stomach and his brain. It had started in the lungs, though, and that was bad news...not a lot they could do about it.

Nothing, really. Dad said that he hated being in the hospital. It was hell. He wanted to see his mother one last time. Mom started applications for hospice care.

Nothing.

Dad is dying at home, now. I'm spending my evenings--and late into the night--sitting at his bedside, making sure he doesn't try to get up without help. He's confused. Hallucinating. At times, he's angry and lashes out at us. At other times, he's terrified and begging us to help him. He's been vomiting large amounts of fresh blood...which, as I've learned, is one thing to hear and quite another to see. He can't eat and is skin and bones...he looks like a starving ninety-year-old man rather than a previously robust sixty-two-year-old (and gods, that was just a few weeks ago.)

My mother and brother and I have to take shifts sitting at his side, but my shifts are short because I have to tend to my children. I go in the evenings, when my husband is at home, and into the night while everyone sleeps. But it's not enough. Mom and my brother are suffering from severe emotional distress and sleep deprivation.

There are times when I think, "This isn't working. We have to take him back to the hospital." Dad doesn't want that...but when he's puking blood or taking swings at mom, I don't care. But the truth is, with no insurance, taking him back to the hospital would saddle mom with bills she'd never be able to repay on top of the ones she already has. She has waived those worries off, with tears in her eyes, saying, "We'll do what we have to. Whatever he wants." But I don't pressure her to take him to the hospital because of my worries about the money. And dad's wishes, too, but damn. This really is becoming too much to bear.

Sorry for the rant. And sorry, too, if I've been snippier than usual, lately. Thanks for putting up with me.

But this is what the health care debate means to me now.

Bubastes
03-29-2012, 06:47 PM
This is the part of the health care debate that depresses me - the blindness of those who fight over this issue to the reality of lives affected by it.

This drives me bonkers. Is it really that difficult for people to put themselves into someone else's shoes? Are they unable to understand something until they've experienced it firsthand? My mind can't wrap around the utter lack of empathy some people have. Ugh, they need to read more fiction.

Alessandra Kelley
03-29-2012, 06:48 PM
My father owned his own business. A computer repair shop in East Texas, in the same building as my mom's business, which was a pet store.

Because they were self-employed, their insurance was ridiculously expensive and covered little. Doctor's visits were only covered after a massive deductible.

As such, my dad didn't go to the doctor. Hell, he didn't like doctors much anyway.

I mentioned here on AW a few times that their businesses were getting broken into on a regular basis and the cops in their town weren't doing a damned thing about it. I wanted them to move here.

They did.

Unfortunately, getting their businesses up and running took longer than they planned. They dropped their expensive and nearly useless insurance. But then dad got sick...really sick. He finally agreed to let us take him in to the doctor.

Who recommended tests.

Who recommended a specialist.

Who had him admitted to the hospital when he came in for his results.

At the hospital, we learned that dad was suffering from what appeared to be stage 4 lung cancer...but it wasn't just in his lungs.

More tests. Expensive ones. And we learned that dad had a major mass and many smaller nodes in each lung. Cancer was in his kidneys, his liver, the lining of his stomach and his brain. It had started in the lungs, though, and that was bad news...not a lot they could do about it.

Nothing, really. Dad said that he hated being in the hospital. It was hell. He wanted to see his mother one last time. Mom started applications for hospice care.

Nothing.

Dad is dying at home, now. I'm spending my evenings--and late into the night--sitting at his bedside, making sure he doesn't try to get up without help. He's confused. Hallucinating. At times, he's angry and lashes out at us. At other times, he's terrified and begging us to help him. He's been vomiting large amounts of fresh blood...which, as I've learned, is one thing to hear and quite another to see. He can't eat and is skin and bones...he looks like a starving ninety-year-old man rather than a previously robust sixty-two-year-old (and gods, that was just a few weeks ago.)

My mother and brother and I have to take shifts sitting at his side, but my shifts are short because I have to tend to my children. I go in the evenings, when my husband is at home, and into the night while everyone sleeps. But it's not enough. Mom and my brother are suffering from severe emotional distress and sleep deprivation.

There are times when I think, "This isn't working. We have to take him back to the hospital." Dad doesn't want that...but when he's puking blood or taking swings at mom, I don't care. But the truth is, with no insurance, taking him back to the hospital would saddle mom with bills she'd never be able to repay on top of the ones she already has. She has waived those worries off, with tears in her eyes, saying, "We'll do what we have to. Whatever he wants." But I don't pressure her to take him to the hospital because of my worries about the money. And dad's wishes, too, but damn. This really is becoming too much to bear.

Sorry for the rant. And sorry, too, if I've been snippier than usual, lately. Thanks for putting up with me.

But this is what the health care debate means to me now.

Oh gods, Monkey, I'm so sorry.

I haven't noticed you being snippy. Your posts are always thoughtful.

Please take care.

Manuel Royal
03-29-2012, 07:08 PM
Monkey, I'm so sorry. No one should have to go through that.

What I hope is that the current SCOTUS hearings, and the mishigas about providing insurance that includes birth control, will make it so clear that the employer-paid-private-insurance system is an unworkable mess, that we'll finally, finally try something else, like national health care. (Which the head of the National Health Service proposed in 1912, a hundred years ago.)

Snowstorm
03-29-2012, 07:22 PM
Oh, Monkey, I am so sorry. :Hug2: to you and your folks.

And the jobs -- well, that's just funny, isn't it? It's always fun when someone gets laid off and finds their job has traveled to another state. A real knee slapper.

Best quote of the thread to me. This really sums up Romney's character to me: can't find funny with both hands, and completely out of touch.

Anaquana
03-29-2012, 07:39 PM
:Hug2:
Monkey, I'm sitting over here and my nose just got all stuffed up and my eyes are watering. It must be allergies, I tell ya.

I will keep your family in my prayers.

Monkey
03-29-2012, 07:56 PM
Thank you to everyone who has offered condolences...I really did hesitate to bring this up on the open forums. But there are so many things that could have gone differently in Dad's story. I really feel the cost of healthcare has been, and continues to be, one of the main reasons that all this has been so rough. And it makes me furious to know that Romney would find it perfectly acceptable to see someone like Dad refused health insurance even if he'd gotten it as soon as he moved here...or dropped as soon as the cancer was discovered because he hadn't been on the same plan long. Whereas if "Obamacare" were already in effect--as opposed to being challenged in the Supreme Court--he'd be covered.

RichardGarfinkle
03-29-2012, 08:04 PM
Thank you to everyone who has offered condolences...I really did hesitate to bring this up on the open forums. But there are so many things that could have gone differently in Dad's story. I really feel the cost of healthcare has been, and continues to be, one of the main reasons that all this has been so rough. And it makes me furious to know that Romney would find it perfectly acceptable to see someone like Dad refused health insurance even if he'd gotten it as soon as he moved here...or dropped as soon as the cancer was discovered because he hadn't been on the same plan long. Whereas if "Obamacare" were already in effect--as opposed to being challenged in the Supreme Court--he'd be covered.

I know this was hard for you to bring up, but it really does help to show the human lives affected.

The most dangerous thing in discussions like this is that they get too abstract and theoretical. The human costs of health care policies must be brought up if people are to understand the importance.

Just as the policies that lead to the loss of lives and homes in the Irish Potato Famine, the Okies losing their homes after the Dust Bowl, and all the other tales of human suffering needed human faces before the errors of policy could be exposed.

This is the show in the show don't tell of politics.
But unlike in fiction, showing human lives is painful.
Thank you again and take our best wishes.

AncientEagle
03-29-2012, 08:16 PM
Monkey, if words could help, I would heap masses of them on you. Suffice it to say that I join all the others in offering sympathy and a degree of understanding, though not to the depth of what you are experiencing. I have sat by the bedside of someone I loved and watched them approach death. In my case, the situation reversed, but I had a taste of the despair and unbearable grief.

I just wish your shifts at bedside could be shared by those who think a sensible national health care program is unacceptable because it's "socialism." (And because they, personally, don't have to worry about it.)

You and yours are in my prayers.

Monkey
03-29-2012, 08:23 PM
Thanks again. It is really appreciated. But I'd be more comfortable with letting the thread get back on track than making this all about dad.

AW is the best online community I've ever found. You guys are great.

icerose
03-29-2012, 10:31 PM
This drives me bonkers. Is it really that difficult for people to put themselves into someone else's shoes? Are they unable to understand something until they've experienced it firsthand? My mind can't wrap around the utter lack of empathy some people have. Ugh, they need to read more fiction.

One thing I've learned through my social work classes that has shocked me but explained so much is that the most difficult barrier to cross is the class barrier, and that it's almost impossible for upper classes to understand lower classes, which is why you see such ridiculousness and double standards in congress and their ilk. They don't get it. They really don't and they never will. They don't know about struggle or sacrifice and so they have zero empathy or understanding towards it. It's why the current elite political system fails 80% of the country 99% of the time.

Mclesh
03-29-2012, 10:38 PM
And all of them are insured by the federal government. No irony there.

I've heard that the members of Congress have great health coverage. I think there is irony there. ;)

regdog
03-30-2012, 12:09 AM
Best wishes to you and your family, Monkey

muravyets
03-30-2012, 03:47 AM
Monkey, my heart goes out to you and your family.

And yeah, that's what it's all about, for real. Not all this bullshit about socialism and enterprise and whatever-the-frig-else.

Mclesh
03-30-2012, 04:31 AM
Monkey, my heart goes out to you and your family.

And yeah, that's what it's all about, for real. Not all this bullshit about socialism and enterprise and whatever-the-frig-else.

QFT.

Alessandra Kelley
03-30-2012, 04:35 AM
One thing I've learned through my social work classes that has shocked me but explained so much is that the most difficult barrier to cross is the class barrier, and that it's almost impossible for upper classes to understand lower classes, which is why you see such ridiculousness and double standards in congress and their ilk. They don't get it. They really don't and they never will. They don't know about struggle or sacrifice and so they have zero empathy or understanding towards it. It's why the current elite political system fails 80% of the country 99% of the time.

My sister and a friend of hers got their Masters Degrees in Education from a prestigious university. They were embarrassed more than once when lecturers told the students, very gravely, that many of the people they were teaching would be of the lower socioeconomic classes.

My siblings and I grew up in pretty dire poverty, and my sister's friend was the child of two janitors.

It was excruciating to hear solemn revelations to the (yes, mostly very privileged upper class) students about the shocking practices of the lower classes which they might encounter, such as turning the children out as soon as they turned eighteen, not being familiar with books, and not doing their laundry regularly.

I suspect the professors were actually trying to be sensitive and give their students an idea of what they might soon have to deal with. But it was obviously from a clinical, outsider's perspective and they obviously gave not the slightest thought to whether any of their students might themselves be from a nonprivileged background.

Gregg
03-30-2012, 07:42 AM
He'll stop being funny long before then.

He's not funny now, but the jokes won't stop.

muravyets
03-30-2012, 08:40 AM
He's not funny now, but the jokes won't stop.
If we don't laugh, we'll cry from thinking about him as president.

blacbird
03-30-2012, 11:29 AM
He's not funny now, but the jokes won't stop.

His "jokes", or the ones others tell about him?

I can hardly wait until Mitt tells a fall-on-the-floor one about welfare mothers, or homeless people.

caw