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LoveAshley
11-18-2011, 08:05 PM
I came with a list of my own inspirational quotes and I would like to post them to my blog, but I want to protect them. I don't mind if people use them as long as my name is credited or they aren't claiming it is their own creation.

Is there any free way to do that?

Parametric
11-18-2011, 08:14 PM
You don't want to trademark them - trademarks are designed to protect the reputation of a business. What you want is copyright. Anything you write is copyright as soon as you write it down, so that's nice and simple.

As you'd like people to reuse your work, you might want to look into a Creative Commons licence (http://creativecommons.org/). It's a free system that helps you give people permission to use your work under the conditions you choose - for example, you can create a licence to allow people to repost your work as long as they give you credit.

You can never be 100% sure that nobody will rip off your work, but it's pretty unlikely, so I wouldn't worry too much.

edit: Here's a sample Creative Commons licence under which the reader is free to share and/or remix the work as long as they credit the author (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

LoveAshley
11-18-2011, 08:35 PM
Thank you! That is helpful.

thothguard51
11-18-2011, 08:39 PM
Ashley,

Are you sure no one else has every uttered those quotes you came up with before?

LoveAshley
11-18-2011, 08:47 PM
Ashley,

Are you sure no one else has every uttered those quotes you came up with before?

I have done google searches to find out and so far I have found nothing. The only thing I am unsure of is a shorter quote I came up with that was inspired by the quote "Be fabulous. Live fabulously" Same format, but I chose another word where the fabulous(ly) is. I haven't found my exact quote anywhere else, but I think it might still be a little short to consider a copyright for it.

seun
11-18-2011, 08:59 PM
I think you're worrying about a non-issue. People use famous quotes all the time. If I say a famous line from a film or a book in conversation, am I supposed to pay the writer?

LoveAshley
11-18-2011, 09:23 PM
I don't want to be paid. I just want my name tagged the end of the quote.

dangerousbill
11-18-2011, 10:41 PM
I don't want to be paid. I just want my name tagged the end of the quote.

You can Google your quotes from time to time and see if anyone's picked them up. If they have, you can inform them of the requirement for an attribution notice. Most people will comply.

LoveAshley
11-18-2011, 10:52 PM
You can Google your quotes from time to time and see if anyone's picked them up. If they have, you can inform them of the requirement for an attribution notice. Most people will comply.

That's true. So could I post them without having to do the creative commons or should I do that still?

bonitakale
11-19-2011, 12:55 AM
Wasn't there something about bumper stickers' not being copyrightable?

LoveAshley
11-19-2011, 01:23 AM
Wasn't there something about bumper stickers' not being copyrightable?

As I am looking into this right now, I think you might be right.

Torgo
11-19-2011, 01:36 AM
Hmm (http://www.wisegeek.com/can-i-copyright-a-phrase.htm).

As one commenter linked above says, the short answer seems to be no, but the long answer seems to be 'yes, but it's not worth it.'

LoveAshley
11-19-2011, 01:49 AM
Hmm (http://www.wisegeek.com/can-i-copyright-a-phrase.htm).

As one commenter linked above says, the short answer seems to be no, but the long answer seems to be 'yes, but it's not worth it.'

"Some people may want to copyright a phrase intended for use as a bumper sticker slogan or other for-profit venture. The current copyright laws in the United States would automatically assign a copyright to a phrase or title or other unique or original expression. There would be no need to submit the short phrase to the official copyright office, but some people may want to establish the creation date of a short phrase in order to protect themselves from copycats."

So from what I gathered from that and some of these replies is that basically I don't need to go through the trouble of having them copyright and I can go ahead and post them as long as there is a fixed date associated with them in the post and a note that they are originally by me, and a request that if anyone uses them to tag my name to it...even though I can't guarantee someone else will try to take credit, however it is unlikely that someone will do that anyway.

Torgo
11-19-2011, 02:00 AM
"Some people may want to copyright a phrase intended for use as a bumper sticker slogan or other for-profit venture. The current copyright laws in the United States would automatically assign a copyright to a phrase or title or other unique or original expression. There would be no need to submit the short phrase to the official copyright office, but some people may want to establish the creation date of a short phrase in order to protect themselves from copycats."

So from what I gathered from that and some of these replies is that basically I don't need to go through the trouble of having them copyright and I can go ahead and post them as long as there is a fixed date associated with them in the post and a note that they are originally by me, and a request that if anyone uses them to tag my name to it...even though I can't guarantee someone else will try to take credit, however it is unlikely that someone will do that anyway.

You never need to 'copyright' anything - anything you write is automatically copyright (c) You the second you've created it. Registering the copyright is just one of the little ways you can leave a paper trail - should you ever get into a dispute about whose words are whose you would need to be able to prove you wrote them first, somehow. So yes, posting them helps establish your authorship.

However, and I'm not a lawyer, it also seems that things you write may need to meet certain standards before they can be called 'works' that would be protected by copyright - slogans just might not be substantial enough, individually, to be works. On the other hand, a collection of sayings would be. So I guess you might only be able to protect your work if a big enough chunk of it is stolen. And then there's the trademarking issue: it looks like you might be able to trademark, say, advertising slogans, if they're distinctive enough.

If you're mostly interested in recognition, not winning court cases, I think the only surefire way to be credited for any individual aphorism you come up with is just for people to want to credit you. Why do we give Oscar Wilde credit for his witty sayings, instead of passing them off as our own? There's no legal reason. I think it's because he said so many witty things that he acquires authority as a wit. If you genuinely inspire people with the things you come up with, they'll start citing you.

LoveAshley
11-19-2011, 02:05 AM
You never need to 'copyright' anything - anything you write is automatically copyright (c) You the second you've created it. Registering the copyright is just one of the little ways you can leave a paper trail - should you ever get into a dispute about whose words are whose you would need to be able to prove you wrote them first, somehow. So yes, posting them helps establish your authorship.

However, and I'm not a lawyer, it also seems that things you write may need to meet certain standards before they can be called 'works' that would be protected by copyright - slogans just might not be substantial enough, individually, to be works. On the other hand, a collection of sayings would be. So I guess you might only be able to protect your work if a big enough chunk of it is stolen. And then there's the trademarking issue: it looks like you might be able to trademark, say, advertising slogans, if they're distinctive enough.

If you're mostly interested in recognition, not winning court cases, I think the only surefire way to be credited for any individual aphorism you come up with is just for people to want to credit you. Why do we give Oscar Wilde credit for his witty sayings, instead of passing them off as our own? There's no legal reason. I think it's because he said so many witty things that he acquires authority as a wit. If you genuinely inspire people with the things you come up with, they'll start citing you.

Ah ok. That clears things up a bit, thank ya!

dangerousbill
11-19-2011, 04:13 AM
Wasn't there something about bumper stickers' not being copyrightable?

Probably, but the average person will poop themselves if they're told that they've violated someone's copyright. In any case, a quote by itself may or may not be copyrightable, but if it's posted as part of a larger work, any use of it falls into the 'fair use' category, which is always fuzzy and negotiable.

A demand for an attribution is reasonable, and most folks will comply.

Jamesaritchie
11-19-2011, 06:18 AM
Copyright protection is not always this simple. Copyright does not protect names, titles, slogans, or short phrases. How short is open to question.


But I wouldn't worry about it. Most people will give you attribution, and others will not. Even on this forum, I see quotations routinely that have no attribution, but what can you do?