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blacbird
07-22-2011, 08:22 AM
Vintage base ball:

http://local.msn.com/boys-of-vintage-summer?GT1=24000

I could have posted this in the sports writing forum, but it struck me as having such genuine overall interest, I put it here. A modular person can move it if desired.

caw

Xelebes
07-22-2011, 08:28 AM
The link won't work for me.

thothguard51
07-22-2011, 08:41 AM
Very interesting article...

blacbird
07-22-2011, 08:41 AM
Can't help ya there, X. It works fine for me. I just checked it again.

But, for further explanation, it's an article about a growing organization devoted to playing "base ball" the way it was played back in the 19th Century, and the organization behind it claims something like 200 teams across the nation are doing this. It just sounds incredibly cool . . . uhhh . . . nifty . . . uhhhhhmmm . . . swell . . . .

What the hell slang for "really good" would they have used in those days?

Gnarly. Let's say gnarly.

caw

sailor
07-22-2011, 08:47 AM
The first thing that struck me when I began to read the article was that Ty Cobb was many things but gentleman wasn't one of them. It seemed one of the people interviewed thought the same thing. Sportsmanship and gentlemanly play isn't passe either. There was an incident that got wide play outside of the sports realm that occured in Apr/2008. Women's college softball, Western Oregon University hosting Central Washington University. A young woman hit her first homerun and missed the first base bag. She turned to touch it and collapsed with a knee injury. The first baseman and shortstop for the opposing team picked her up and carried her around the bases, letting her touch each with her good leg. And knocked themselves out of the tournament.

Unbelievable Sportsmanship in Softball Game (http://nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/24392612/)

blacbird
07-22-2011, 08:57 AM
The first thing that struck me when I began to read the article was that Ty Cobb was many things but gentleman wasn't one of them.

Ty Cobb also didn't play "vintage base ball". His career was entirely in the 20th century, after the creation of the American League in 1903 or thereabouts. "Base ball" had already become "baseball", a big deal, and the first World Series had already been played.

Ty Cobb was probably the most reprehensible human being ever to play a significant on-field role in any professional sport in human history. Just plain a miserable sonofabitch, by all accounts. He makes Pete Rose, who broke his hit record, look like Albert Schweitzer. Next to Cobb, Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens wear halos.

caw

Kitty Pryde
07-22-2011, 09:00 AM
A more gentlemanly era? The 1860s? ORLY? Back in the glorious part of history when slavery was legal, and you had to be white, wealthy, and male to vote. Ahh, the good ole days. How I miss them! Are people of color permitted to play on these base ball teams? It seems ungentlemanly.

thothguard51
07-22-2011, 09:19 AM
As I recall, the TV western, Have Gun, Will Travel had an episode where the Palladin was hired to umpire a game between two rival towns in the west. I remember a guy running for first base and a person in the crowd watching shot him in the leg before he got to first base. The call, he was out...

billythrilly7th
07-22-2011, 10:37 AM
A more gentlemanly era? The 1860s? ORLY? Back in the glorious part of history when slavery was legal, and you had to be white, wealthy, and male to vote. Ahh, the good ole days. How I miss them! Are people of color permitted to play on these base ball teams? It seems ungentlemanly.

Ohhhh Jesus.

SirOtter
07-22-2011, 11:28 AM
Ty Cobb was probably the most reprehensible human being ever to play a significant on-field role in any professional sport in human history. Just plain a miserable sonofabitch, by all accounts. He makes Pete Rose, who broke his hit record, look like Albert Schweitzer. Next to Cobb, Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens wear halos.

caw

Cobb once climbed into the stands and beat up a heckler who had no arms. He probably bet on games, but that craven jackal Judge Landis didn't ban him because he was scared to death of him. Shoeless Joe was at least as good, but he wasn't apt to hunt the commissioner of baseball down like a dog and shoot him. Cobb had already killed one man - what's one more? Jackson got tossed out, Cobb stayed in and was the first man elected into the Hall of Fame. C'est la vie.

Not that all the pre-modern era players were such great 'gentlemen', either. King Kelly drank himself to death, and Big Ed Delahanty died under mysterious circumstances after being put off a train crossing the International Bridge between Ontario and Buffalo, New York while jumping teams in 1903, at the end of a great career.

Still, this looks like fun. Of all the major sports, only baseball has such a wonderfully developed sense of its own history. That's one of the things I love about the game.

blacbird
07-22-2011, 11:40 AM
Cobb once climbed into the stands and beat up a heckler who had no arms. He probably bet on games, but that craven jackal Judge Landis didn't ban him because he was scared to death of him. Shoeless Joe was at least as good, but he wasn't apt to hunt the commissioner of baseball down like a dog and shoot him. Cobb had already killed one man - what's one more?

Have we mentioned yet that he was a virulent racist and anti-semite?

Yeah, Ty Cobb, the Georgia Peach. Real peachy, ol' Ty was.

caw

poetinahat
07-22-2011, 12:07 PM
Ohhhh Jesus.
If you build it, they will come.

The straw men, that is.

SirOtter
07-22-2011, 12:33 PM
Ty Cobb also didn't play "vintage base ball". His career was entirely in the 20th century, after the creation of the American League in 1903 or thereabouts.

1901. The first modern era World Series between the NL and the AL was 1903.

Zoombie
07-22-2011, 01:22 PM
A more gentlemanly era? The 1860s? ORLY? Back in the glorious part of history when slavery was legal, and you had to be white, wealthy, and male to vote. Ahh, the good ole days. How I miss them! Are people of color permitted to play on these base ball teams? It seems ungentlemanly.

As fun as it is to enjoy the old timy games, we should all be thankful that these base ball players don't go "100%" in their historical accuracy.

But, hey, I think it's more than awesome that people are taking good parts of bad history and bringing it back. There was nice stuff even in the worst of times, and I don't see any reason why we can't treasure it.

Now, personally, I'm not so good at baseball and I don't enjoy it very much, but I can understand how other people would enjoy it.

So, good on these peeps.

Bartholomew
07-22-2011, 02:14 PM
I'm not so good at base ball

fixed.

Diana Hignutt
07-22-2011, 04:03 PM
It's 80's retro night at Citizens Bank Park tonight! The Phils will be wearing their baby blues and the Padres are wearing brown, I think. Hammels to crush the opposition.

I have grown to love base ball, but it is still just a game. A game that many take too seriously, and that takes itself too seriously. Sometimes the commentators talk about a player's acheivements, and I'm like...acheivements? They play a game for a living?

Michael Wolfe
07-22-2011, 05:52 PM
Thanks for posting this, B-bird. I enjoyed reading it.

Gretad08
07-22-2011, 06:03 PM
BB, I thought you were posting this story: http://www.yardbarker.com/mlb/articles/msn/video_young_fan_seflessly_returns_ball_thrown_into _stands_to_even_younger_fan/5647294

I had just read this one, when I saw your thread. Very cool idea to bring back some of the good qualities of the old game.

PorterStarrByrd
07-22-2011, 06:07 PM
Love the game and its history. As a former umpire who has done some major league spring training games and a former SABR member who is writing a book about the 69 redstockings, I enjoyed the article
The game had a lot of non-gentlemen though. The Redstockings were the first team to ADMIT they had a professional roster. They went on a national tour, went undefeated, and came home a couple of bucks (literally) in the black, proving the viability of pro-baseball.
From then til now is a damned interesting library of stories (visit Cooperstown)
Thanks for the link.