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folkchick
06-19-2011, 12:39 AM
This may not be the right place to post this, but I was just thinking how nice it would be to have an editing support thread for those of us currently in the editing-toward-publication stages.

I just sent off my first round, and I'm mixed with happy expectation and complete dread, as if I've sent off dirty laundry. Anyone else get all mixed-up like this? I'd love to hear everyone's experiences, current and past. And, yes, I'd love for this to become a place for us to come and get some stress out and compare notes. Though I don't want anyone to name an editor or agent personally unless it's complimentary. I love my editor, she's working hard to make me look good.

I just sent the edits for the first fifty pages and now have to apply my editor's notes to the rest of the book. I hope she likes what I sent so far, but I'm nervous and feel a bit sick.

MercyMe
06-19-2011, 02:52 AM
Oh, this sounds perfect for me right now. I'm expecting an editorial letter at the beginning of July and I think I'll have a fast turnaround that is freaking me out a little.

I don't know what an editorial letter looks like so I combed through old editor posts here in AW and found one lovely author who posted hers on her blog. Intimidating. But doable...?

I'm working on a third book now that I must get into solid shape by the time that letter arrives or I'll never have it finished for September.

First question: Was there anything in your ed notes that you thought "holy hell, I cannot do this?" :flag:

Mr Flibble
06-19-2011, 02:57 AM
Ah the editing letter.

the one that you read and think 'Oh crap, why didn't I see that? Doh! Why the heck did they buy this book....'

It gets better as you work through though. Although my brain feels like it's made of cottage cheese just now. The best bit is seeing how the changes strengthen the book.
Was there anything in your ed notes that you thought "holy hell, I cannot do this?"

I did have that for one, not I can;t, but do I want to? I though I'd give it a go, and holy heck, the change it made to the end! Worth it. Even the bleeding eyes. :D

blacbird
06-19-2011, 10:55 AM
I just sent the edits for the first fifty pages and now have to apply my editor's notes to the rest of the book. I hope she likes what I sent so far, but I'm nervous and feel a bit sick.

Christ, you have an acceptance and an editor, working toward a publication. Why the hell aren't you rejoicing????????????

folkchick
06-19-2011, 05:09 PM
blacbird- Per your advice, I am going to give myself a two-sencond interval of robust rejoicing. Are you ready? Yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay.

Now, back to work.

Amarie
06-19-2011, 05:19 PM
The most important thing I learned from going through the editorial process is that you don't have to follow all the suggestions exactly. Many times you can get the essence of the change in a different way. For example, in my first book, the editor wanted a different beginning chapter and made a suggestion as to the setting of it. I couldn't write it that way, but I understood why she wanted the change, so I set it a different way, still accomplishing what she was looking for.

MercyMe
06-20-2011, 05:13 AM
Amarie and IdiotsRUs, thank you for posting. It helps to have a sense of what's coming. And actually, it's kind of encouraging if it makes for a better book.

Was there anything that you thought you'd nailed and the editor kept coming back with "not yet"?

folkchick
06-20-2011, 05:52 AM
MercyMe is right, thank you for sharing your experience. It is extremely helpful to hear these things!

Amarie
06-20-2011, 03:32 PM
Amarie and IdiotsRUs, thank you for posting. It helps to have a sense of what's coming. And actually, it's kind of encouraging if it makes for a better book.

Was there anything that you thought you'd nailed and the editor kept coming back with "not yet"?


On both books the parts that took the most time were descriptions of the layout of everything in the setting. My characters have to move around a lot since they are having adventures, and while I could see the settings perfectly in my head, my editor had a hard time understanding the locations and where the characters were in relation to them. For both books I ended up drawing little maps to send to her, and then she'd work from there to see what had been confusing her.

I do want to add, if there is something you absolutely want to keep in and your editor wants to cut, make a very strong case for it and stick to it. In WR one of my characters had a beloved pair of red cowboy boots she wore all the time, and my editor kept cutting the references to those. I put them back in and finally they stayed. Those boots were tied to the character development so I needed them in the book.

folkchick
06-20-2011, 04:38 PM
Here are a few more questions: How long did it take for you to complete each round of edits? And were the edits for the full manuscript, or one section at a time?

Thank you again!