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View Full Version : Call me clueless, but WHY would one ocean rise faster than another ocean?


Plot Device
09-06-2010, 02:25 AM
Scientists in India believe that the Indian Ocean is experiencing sea level rise at a faster rate than other oceans of the world. (They took measurements, etc.)

But how can that be? My 5th grade science teacher taught us that water always sinks to its own level. Shouldn't ALL the oceans of the world be rising at the same rate?

(BTW, I am NOT an opponent/denier of the idea of sea-level rise. The doomster in me won't let me deny it.)

http://www.asianage.com/india/indian-ocean-rising-faster-others-394



Indian Ocean rising faster than others

Sep 05th, 2010 - Rashme Sehgal (http://www.asianage.com/category/author/rashme-sehgal)

Newly detected rising sea levels in parts of the Indian Ocean have led Indian scientists to conclude that the Indian Ocean is rising faster than other oceans.

Dr Satheesh C. Shenoi, director, Indian National Centre for Ocean Infor-mation Services, speaking at a workshop on “Coasts, Coastal Populations and their Concerns”

Organised by the Centre for Science and Environment, warned that sea surface measurements and satellite observations confirm that an anthropogenic climate warming is amplifying regional sea rise changes in the Indian Ocean .

This would have far-reaching impacts on the climate of vulnerable nations, including the coastlines on the Bay of Bengal, the Arabian Sea, Sri Lanka and parts of Indonesia as a result of human-induced increases in atmospheric greenhouse gases....


[snip]

Plot Device
09-06-2010, 02:27 AM
Sudden brain storm just hit Plot Device!!!

Could it be that the Indian Tectonic Plate (http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/infopage/tectonic.gif)is .... sinking???

Zoombie
09-06-2010, 02:33 AM
It could be for any number of reasons, really.

I think we should study this and find out more.

TerzaRima
09-06-2010, 03:59 AM
WHY would one ocean rise faster than another ocean?

Because there are giant fanged subterranean monsters pushing against this ocean floor. The CIA has tried to keep this quiet, but that's also happening under all the great bodies of water and soon they will rise from the sea and kill us all dead, dead, dead.

blacbird
09-06-2010, 04:06 AM
All coasts are active in one way or another. Some are subsiding due to sediment loading (Louisiana), some rising due to tectonic forces (California). A place like the Ganges-Brahmaputra delta would have serious and continuing subsidence problems, although the sedimentation right now would appear to be exceeding the subsidence rate. But I'd guess this is more an issue of coastal interaction with the sea.

TerzaRima
09-06-2010, 04:11 AM
No, no, no. Secret monsters. Death to everyone.

Jessianodel
09-06-2010, 04:25 AM
Relax Terza everyone can still die

Kaiser-Kun
09-06-2010, 04:36 AM
http://img.applesfera.com/2008/09/CTHULHU-cielo.jpg

defcon6000
09-06-2010, 04:52 AM
I blame Godzilla.

billythrilly7th
09-06-2010, 05:07 AM
I blame Godzilla.

Yep. And too bad Aquaman was killed in the BP oil explosion or he may have been able to do something about it.

Damn you to hell, British Petroleum!

jvc
09-06-2010, 05:14 AM
My sister was swimming in the ocean when those measurements were taken. That probably did something to throw the results off.

thothguard51
09-06-2010, 05:44 AM
My sister was swimming in the ocean when those measurements were taken. That probably did something to throw the results off.

I'm gonna tell, I'm gonna tell...

thothguard51
09-06-2010, 05:54 AM
I once read that the US was considering building another Panama Canal to help accomodate larger vessels. They were considering a system without locks, but the problem is, there is a 8 foot difference in sea level from one end of the Panama Canal to the other end. They also feared species migration from the Atlantic to the Pacific could distrupt the balance of certain species.

jvc
09-06-2010, 06:04 AM
I once read that the US was considering building another Panama Canal to help accomodate larger vessels. They were considering a system without locks, but the problem is, there is a 8 foot difference in sea level from one end of the Panama Canal to the other end. They also feared species migration from the Atalantic to the Pacific could distrupt the balance of certain species.
Yep, they were going to widen it to accomadate my sister. However, 8 foot wasn't enough. And it was too much trouble to widen it another 34 feet.

thothguard51
09-06-2010, 06:10 AM
I repeat...I'm gonna tell, I'm gonna tell...

Plot Device
09-06-2010, 06:19 AM
I once read that the US was considering building another Panama Canal to help accomodate larger vessels. They were considering a system without locks, but the problem is, there is a 8 foot difference in sea level from one end of the Panama Canal to the other end. They also feared species migration from the Atalantic to the Pacific could distrupt the balance of certain species.


Hmmm.

Lemmie do some Googling ....





Ah.


http://geography.about.com/library/faq/blqzpanamaocean.htm


What is the difference in the sea level of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans at the Panama Canal?

At the Panama Canal, the difference between the average sea level of the Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean is about eight inches higher on the Pacific side.

Cecil Adams addressed this issue (http://geography.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a5%5F046.html) in one of his 'Straight Dope' columns.





and ....



http://www.czbrats.com/Articles/oceans.htm




NO, THE ATLANTIC and Pacific oceans are NOT level with each other.

Not along the coasts of the Isthmus.

If fact, it's possible that the level of the Pacific could be nearly 12 feet above the level of the Atlantic at the the same time.

The difference in level averages only 9.2 inches, however, records of Panama Canal Chief Hydrographer W. H. Esslinger show.

Many Isthmians find it important to keep track of the tides. Bathers want to know whether they'll find good swimming or mudflats at a certain point. Fishermen say they affect the catch.

Where marine ways are not available for hauling out small craft, the practice is to beach them at high tide, then work fast to slap on a coat of paint or make repairs before they're seaborne again on the next high tide.

Balboa has a regular tide with two highs and two lows every lunar day, with an average range from high to low tide of 12.758 feet and a maximum range of 22.7 feet.

Cristobal has an irregular tide varying from two highs and two lows to one high and one low each lunar day - with all possible intermediate variations. But the average range from high to low tide is only .858 feet and the maximum range is 3.05 feet.







and ...........




http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermohaline_circulation

This Wiki article basically says the Pacific has more water, blah blah blah, and also there's something about the temperature of the water, blah blah blah, and there's the added issue with the volume of the the salt, blah, blah, blah, so the water in one ocean is more dense than the water in the other ocean, and that's why the one ocean (the Pacific) is HIGHER than the other (the Atlantic).

Here's one section of the Wiki article which explains all that AND which also includes significant mention of the Indian Ocean in the whole thermohaline cycle thingy.


[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Thermohaline_circulation&action=edit&section=3)] Movement of thermohaline circulation

Formation and movement of the deep water masses at the North Atlantic Ocean, creates sinking water masses that fill the basin and flows very slowly into the deep abyssal plains of the Atlantic. This high latitude cooling and the low latitude heating drives the movement of the deep water in a polar southward flow. The deep water flows through the Antarctic Ocean (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antarctic_Ocean) Basin around South Africa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Africa) where it is split into two routes: one into the Indian Ocean (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Ocean) and one past Australia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia) into the Pacific.
At the Indian Ocean, some of the cold and salty water from Atlantic — drawn by the flow of warmer and fresher upper ocean water from the tropical Pacific — causes a vertical exchange of dense, sinking water with lighter water above. It is known as overturning. In the Pacific Ocean, the rest of the cold and salty water from the Atlantic undergoes Haline forcing (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Haline_forcing&action=edit&redlink=1) and slowly becomes warmer and fresher.

The out-flowing undersea of cold and salty water makes the sea level of the Atlantic slightly lower than the Pacific and salinity or halinity of water at the Atlantic higher than the Pacific. This generates a large but slow flow of warmer and fresher upper ocean water from the tropical Pacific to the Indian Ocean (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Ocean) through the Indonesian Archipelago (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indonesian_Archipelago) to replace the cold and salty Antarctic Bottom Water (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antarctic_Bottom_Water). This is also known as Haline forcing (net high latitude freshwater gain and low latitude evaporation). This warmer, fresher water from the Pacific flows up through the South Atlantic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Atlantic) to Greenland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenland), where it cools off and undergoes evaporative cooling (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evaporative_cooling) and sinks to the ocean floor, providing a continuous thermohaline circulation[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermohaline_circulation#cite_note-1).

Hence, a recent and popular name for the thermohaline circulation, emphasizing the vertical nature and pole-to-pole character of this kind of ocean circulation, is the meridional overturning circulation.



So ..... looks like thothguard51 solved today's mystery! :)

thothguard51
09-06-2010, 06:34 AM
Do I get cookies or special snuggles? I prefer the snuggles. Unless they are from JVC's sister...

jvc
09-06-2010, 08:41 PM
Do I get cookies or special snuggles? I prefer the snuggles. Unless they are from JVC's sister...
I'm gonna tell, I'm gonna tell :e2tongue:

Williebee
09-06-2010, 09:43 PM
I am SO tempted to close this thread, right here.

Just to preserve the timing of the joke.

:)

GeorgeK
09-08-2010, 01:32 AM
But how can that be? My 5th grade science teacher taught us that water always sinks to its own level.

Obviously your 5th grade science teacher was wrong....again....everything they taught us was wrong. It's a conspiracy.

Norman D Gutter
09-08-2010, 04:08 AM
Maybe the Coriolis Effect has a little bit to do with it. At least that's what Dr. Higby said in Earth Science class 39 years ago.

clintl
09-08-2010, 06:40 AM
They also feared species migration from the Atlantic to the Pacific could distrupt the balance of certain species.

Change that "could" to "would."

thothguard51
09-08-2010, 06:49 AM
Would it is...

From what I remember, the article suggested most species of fish in the Pacific are a bit more predatory and aggressive than those found in the Atlantic... Unsure why that would be...temperature maybe?

Williebee
09-08-2010, 06:54 AM
It's odd. I remember learning about how the Panama Canal works, and about the difference in sea level from one side to the other, but it never occurred to me, while looking at a globe and think "huh?"

thothguard51
09-08-2010, 06:57 AM
Imagine if the tides come in at the same time - from either side?

Surfs up dude...