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OneWriter
07-22-2010, 11:45 PM
I don't really have a question, I was just looking at this forum and thinking: Shouldn't we have a Latin thread? You know, a place where people can post Latin questions or trivia.

Fallen
07-23-2010, 12:07 AM
*polishes off Latin conjugation and declension book*

Erm...

quis es? Oh...Onewriter est.

I think this is an excellent idea, hun. Now, how do you translate that? :D Rufus, you dare -- you just dare :D :D

OneWriter
07-23-2010, 12:21 AM
Oh, yeah, let's lure Rufus in here! I mean, what kind of Latin thread would it be without Rufus? Hey, but I think the question needs to be more complicated than that, that's too easy, Fallen, pick something better!!

Rufus, tibi clamamus: veni ut cum nobis consortium in eo foro teneas!

OK, that was really lame, so here are my questions for you Rufus: how would you translate "company" (in the sense I meant above)?

SaraP
07-23-2010, 12:47 AM
Rufus quid es?

Ok, that was totally made up, but you all did get me intrigued.

Liosse de Velishaf
07-23-2010, 12:59 AM
My Latin is so rusty... :(

SaraP
07-23-2010, 01:01 AM
Don't worry Liosse, mine is a few hundred years rusty. :D

Fallen
07-23-2010, 01:03 AM
Rufus is one of our Latin supremes, SaraP:D. And if he goes all big translations on me, I'm getting my whip out again...

Hey, One, hang on, I'm still stuck on tibi clamamus *thumbs through Latin book* right, 'to you we call', ah, 'we call/ask you'?.

Right -- what was the next word...

Bloomin' useless I am. :D

Edit: LDV, i bet you're better than I am. Lol.

OneWriter
07-23-2010, 01:07 AM
*** looks over her shoulder ***

pssst, Fallen... if you catch a mistake in what I wrote let me know before Rufus gets here, ok? I mean, the Romans were my ancestors, I can't look bad on this thread, can I????

*** straddles off her merry way, looking casual ***

OneWriter
07-23-2010, 01:12 AM
My Latin is so rusty... :(

Don't worry Liosse, mine is a few hundred years rusty. :D

Well that's exactly why I started this forum: so we can all help one another refresh it as for one reason or the other we all like some Latin quotes in our WIP's, don't we? He he, whenever I can't remember a word I just go for Spanish, isn't that funny??? Thank goodness there's Wiktionary!!!

Medievalist
07-23-2010, 01:14 AM
My Latin is so rusty... :(

So is Rufus. Or at least his hair (lit. "red-haired," from L. rufus)

Fallen
07-23-2010, 01:19 AM
*whispers* ok, hun, I'll distract him. I've got a shiny new Latin book in the corner: cover's not been touched or anything, can't fail to take distract his careful eye--

*looks sharply over shoulder*

Phew *wipes brow* thought that was him then. You stay by me, hun. It's safer in groups. *shifts closer to OneW*...

OneWriter
07-23-2010, 01:22 AM
So is Rufus. Or at least his hair (lit. "red-haired," from L. rufus)

Ha, never thought of that! great catch, Med!!! ;)

PS I meant to tell you a looong time ago: even though your avatar is beautiful, I still miss the Scapigliata.... :(

Medievalist
07-23-2010, 01:27 AM
Ha, never thought of that! great catch, Med!!! ;)

PS I meant to tell you a looong time ago: even though your avatar is beautiful, I still miss the Scapigliata.... :(

Thanks--it is one of my favorite images, but this avatar has some advantages as well.

Medievalist
07-23-2010, 01:28 AM
If you need a refresher, or are new to Classical Latin, check out this:

http://www.cherryh.com/www/latin_language.htm

Fallen
07-23-2010, 01:29 AM
Hey, One, med' and Sara' are here now. *sighs relief* Maybe we can ask them to do the Uhura dance from Star Trek. You know the one on the movie, with the feathers as she dances on a distant sanddune...?

*wonders off humming some lonely desert song*

Okay, so I finally admitted I'm a Star Trek fan...

Thank you for that link, Med'. I need a serious brush up on mine. ;)

OneWriter
07-23-2010, 01:39 AM
Hey, One, med' and Sara' are here now.

I know, quite a crowd! Calls for something special!
Hey, look how talkative I've become! I feel like I'm virtually drunk!
Or as drunk as a non-drinker can get... ha, the beauty of the virtual world... *** hic-ups ***

Fallen
07-23-2010, 01:47 AM
:e2drunk:

*chuckles* I'm the one on the right.

OneWriter
07-23-2010, 01:50 AM
:e2drunk:

*chuckles* I'm the one on the right.

:roll:

that makes me the one on the left, then, huh? if I still know left from right....

Gee, I really meant this thread to be serious!!! Well, it needed a grand opening party, right?

:partyguy:

Fallen
07-23-2010, 01:57 AM
:D

Serious face. Favourite Latin quote: qui tacet consentit (a good one for the parents at my daughter's school): he who stays silent, consents.

OneWriter
07-23-2010, 02:01 AM
Yup! Chi tace acconsente.
Hold on... was I supposed to post that on the Italian thread?
*** hic! *** Nah, I'll never find my way back there...
Oh, how cute... hic is a Latin word!!! So I guess it's OK to be drunk over here!!! :D

Fallen
07-23-2010, 02:12 AM
omg, hic, haec, hoc, hi, hae, haec or something like that! I remember!!! 'This person' 'this thing' (S.) 'the latter' (pl).

*Pokes Latin teacher in the eye* and you said I'd never remember a thing. Mind you, he (later she) did make me sing it to remember!!!

Hathor
07-23-2010, 03:35 AM
Vita vinum est. Since word order makes no difference, it means both "wine is life" and "life is wine." One of my favorites quotations -- especially since I've been querying :D

Fallen
07-23-2010, 04:49 AM
Hi, Hathor! Good to meet you. Isn't there the Latin rule somewhere that relative clauses take the nominative? Vita (fem. nom) vinum (neut, nom)...Old memories going... (I'm saying you're right, hun, I just can't remember whether relative clauses get nom forms...)

:D

Bartholomew
07-23-2010, 05:26 AM
Lorem ipsum molestie scriptorem in duo, hinc dicam in vel. Erant graecis sententiae vel te, sensibus senserit cu cum. Quem erat adversarium te quo, sea tincidunt rationibus in, vim et essent repudiandae. In sit epicurei assueverit, delenit temporibus nam ea. Qui modo iriure volutpat te, his ad partem aeterno elaboraret. Ex erat sensibus sed, ad nonumy interesset pri?

Has tractatos inciderint cu, ferri probatus honestatis ex vel. Habeo meliore ut sed. Est ex solet iriure! Sea elit eleifend ut, veniam mediocrem vim ut. Ex sea patrioque hendrerit, vim dico putent at, id nonummy gubergren sea.

Docendi dissentias ei mei. Natum patrioque at cum, munere vivendum legendos nec ad, et vix iriure perfecto persecuti? An luptatum sapientem est, et vim wisi vivendo oportere. Esse putent consetetur no quo, in eam viris veniam, dico patrioque qui at. Liber omnium nominavi te est. Reque sapientem at vix, cibo invidunt aliquyam his in!

An scaevola inimicus ullamcorper per, eu conceptam reformidans per.

Bartholomew
07-23-2010, 05:27 AM
The above is what latin texts always looked like to me. :) If anyone's curious, it's a random psuedo-latin "language" meant to fill white space in web design.

OneWriter
07-23-2010, 05:33 AM
You mean it has no meaning whatsoever? What's the purpose???

Liosse de Velishaf
07-23-2010, 06:02 AM
Vita vinum est. Since word order makes no difference, it means both "wine is life" and "life is wine." One of my favorites quotations -- especially since I've been querying :D


Word order does make a difference, just not a strictly syntactic one.

Medievalist
07-23-2010, 07:17 AM
The above is what latin texts always looked like to me. :) If anyone's curious, it's a random psuedo-latin "language" meant to fill white space in web design.

The words are all legit, it's just that the syntax and context are meaningless.

Lorum Ipsum text goes back to the days of cold type, c. late 1700s. It's sample text to allow a printer to adjust spacing and layout without having to wait for content from the writer.

Bartholomew
07-23-2010, 07:34 AM
Ahah. Cool. Didn't know that. I thought it was fairly recent.


You mean it has no meaning whatsoever? What's the purpose???


It has meaning. It's really latin. I just have no idea what it says, and unless you subscribe to some sort of palabramancy, the meaning of the words together has no significance.

I use it to make a newspaper look good before I've got content for it. Since the articles are usually around 600 - 800 words, I can get the layout more or less correct BEFORE the writers' deadline smacks us all in the face.

OneWriter
07-23-2010, 08:26 AM
Fascinating! And glad I don't have to translate that!!! :D

SaraP
07-23-2010, 08:34 AM
The things I learn around this place ...

Hathor
07-23-2010, 09:48 AM
Word order does make a difference, just not a strictly syntactic one.

What would be the difference in the quotation I used? I remember it from my daughter's Latin text, where it was used to demonstrate that word order doesn't make a difference. Perhaps I shouldn't have said anything ... it's been a long time since I studied the language itself. I just love the quote ;)

Medievalist
07-23-2010, 09:51 AM
What would be the difference in the quotation I used? I remember it from my daughter's Latin text, where it was used to demonstrate that word order doesn't make a difference. Perhaps I shouldn't have said anything ... it's been a long time since I studied the language itself. I just love the quote ;)

The extent to which word order makes a difference in part depends on the era . . . .and yeah, that's one of the sententiae that was used all the way back in the sixteenth century.

Medievalist
07-23-2010, 09:53 AM
Ahah. Cool. Didn't know that. I thought it was fairly recent.

Now here's a funny thing; the practice of using dummy text, including Lorum Ipsum is called greeking (http://www.designtalkboard.com/glossary/fonts/g-glossary.php).

Cliff Face
07-23-2010, 09:55 AM
I never even had the option of studying Latin in school...

I've always wondered what "Veni vidi vici" means. Any help?

Rufus Coppertop
07-23-2010, 01:26 PM
Oh, yeah, let's lure Rufus in here! Tractus sum! Adsum, postremo. Labor me morabatur.

I mean, what kind of Latin thread would it be without Rufus?:)

Gratias tibi do!

Hey, but I think the question needs to be more complicated than that, that's too easy, Fallen, pick something better!!

Rufus, tibi clamamus: veni ut cum nobis consortium in eo foro teneas!Okay, nice purpose clause there & neat subjunctive!

"Rufus, we call you to come that you might keep company with us in this place!"

OK, that was really lame, so here are my questions for you Rufus: how would you translate "company" (in the sense I meant above)?Non putavi id claudus esse! (I didn't think it to be lame.)

Societatem (acc) is a viable alternative.

Rufus Coppertop
07-23-2010, 01:31 PM
*polishes off Latin conjugation and declension book*

Erm...

quis es? Oh...Onewriter est.

I think this is an excellent idea, hun. Now, how do you translate that? :D Rufus, you dare -- you just dare :D :D

Oh-kaaay! Togam habeo so ....

Puto haec notionem excellentissime praeclara esse!

:evil

Rufus Coppertop
07-23-2010, 01:39 PM
Rufus is one of our Latin supremes, SaraP:D. And if he goes all big translations on me, I'm getting my whip out again...


Promise?

:e2woo:

Rufus Coppertop
07-23-2010, 01:43 PM
So is Rufus. Or at least his hair (lit. "red-haired," from L. rufus)

No. I just like the sound of it.

Rufus Coppertop
07-23-2010, 01:47 PM
If you need a refresher, or are new to Classical Latin, check out this:

http://www.cherryh.com/www/latin_language.htm

I just had a look. It's a good intro.

Rufus Coppertop
07-23-2010, 01:49 PM
*whispers* ok, hun, I'll distract him. I've got a shiny new Latin book in the corner: cover's not been touched or anything, can't fail to take distract his careful eye--

*looks sharply over shoulder*

Phew *wipes brow* thought that was him then. You stay by me, hun. It's safer in groups. *shifts closer to OneW*...

Oh bugger!

And it's all right, you're not suffering from Rufaphobia, I really was sneaking up on it.

Rufus Coppertop
07-23-2010, 01:52 PM
:e2drunk:

*chuckles* I'm the one on the right.

Hellooooo! :e2dance:

Fallen
07-23-2010, 03:25 PM
est -- Rufus!!!!!!!!!!!


:e2woo: :e2woo: :e2woo:


So good to have you back with us and talking Latin, hun!!!!

The brains on AW never fails to floor me.

Psst *whispers in ruf's ear* I didn't know that blank Latin text was called 'greeking', did you? Med knows her stuff...

Now, about 'puto haec...', :D

Rufus Coppertop
07-23-2010, 04:22 PM
est -- Rufus!!!!!!!!!!!


:e2woo: :e2woo: :e2woo:


So good to have you back with us and talking Latin, hun!!!!

The brains on AW never fails to floor me.

Psst *whispers in ruf's ear* I didn't know that blank Latin text was called 'greeking', did you? Med knows her stuff...

Now, about 'puto haec...', :D

I had no idea. The first time I saw it was a month ago because my stepfather's building an internet business which is about to launch. They had lorem ipsum up and I was scanning it and becoming annoyed and then I saw the (alleged) word "adipiscing" and I thought "id excrementum est"!

It's good to be back.

OneWriter
07-23-2010, 06:08 PM
Hey!!! Rufus' here!!! :hi:

What did I miss???

OK, hold on the Latin, I need coffee first.....

There, got my coffee. Just don't go on to the Italian forum telling them I call coffee this kind of junk. I just need it to wake up!! :D

Anyways, since we started talking about proverbiums: what's you guys' favorites in Latin?
My favorite one is up there: Ubi dudium ibi libertas. It applies nicely to everything in life and, since I'm a scientist, to work as well. I also love: Gutta cavat lapidem, non vi, sed saepe cadendo.... That's how my kids get what they want.



I've always wondered what "Veni vidi vici" means. Any help?


Veni, Vidi, Vici: I came, I saw, I won. Very modest little nugget from Caesar after he conquered Pontus. It was a short battle so that's how he bragged about it.

Fallen
07-23-2010, 06:27 PM
Hey, One, mine's a mocha choca, remember!!!

Rufus, first rule AW club -- you have no life outside of AW club. Second rule of AW club, well it involves a plastic pig, pegs and an elephant...:D you ever figure it out, let me know -- in Latin, of course!

Lol, it's just good to see posting back on here, hun. I know our One's missed you too. ;) Oh, and my kid got that tattoo :D

OneWriter
07-23-2010, 06:32 PM
What tattoo? Pig, pegs and elephants? Whoa, lady, you're going too fast....
*** gulps down rest of coffee ***

Hey, no fair, you've been up longer than me... And I haven't had my morning walk yet, so technically I'm still half asleep.... Oooh, but me loves mocha.... can't have it at home, though.... sigh....

SaraP
07-23-2010, 06:43 PM
*peeks in*

Plastic pig? Pegs? Elephant? And Rufus has appeared?

Carry on. :D

Fallen
07-23-2010, 10:56 PM
*Waves SaraP over* Coffee, hun? :D

Tatoo.... my eldest kid, One, he wanted the Latin equivalent of 'one life, live it'. Ruf helped me out!!!!

And I really need to sleep of a night. I'm seeing plastic pigs (ah, which are three wheeled cars over here, btw;)) pegs and elephants...

Bartholomew
07-24-2010, 01:20 AM
So... my name as an object in a Latin sentence would be Bartholomem? Or Bartholomewem? I kind of like Bartholomem better.

(I'm assuming the accusative case is at least similar to the object of an English sentence.)

OneWriter
07-24-2010, 03:22 AM
It depends on the root. What's your root? :)

Are you Bartolomew, Bartolomewis or are you Bartolomew, Bartolomeis ?

Bartholomew
07-24-2010, 03:54 AM
It depends on the root. What's your root? :)

Are you Bartolomew, Bartolomewis or are you Bartolomew, Bartolomeis ?

O, I get to pick?

Why is the H dropped?

Honestly, I'd probably be something like Tolus / Tolum. (A lot of my friends call me Thole.)

Medievalist
07-24-2010, 03:59 AM
Bartholomaeus

It's a pretty common medieval name, as in Bartholomaeus Angelicus

Bartholomew
07-24-2010, 04:29 AM
In the accusative case, I'd be Bartholomaeum?

OneWriter
07-24-2010, 05:03 AM
O, I get to pick?

Why is the H dropped?



sorry, typo

yeah, the original Latin name would be Bartholomaeus or later I think it became Bartholomeus too...

I was just playing with your Anglicization...

Bartholomew
07-24-2010, 05:07 AM
I think names have lee-way. :)

So... how would an Asian have modified his name, if she got lost in ancient Rome?

Say her name is Li.

Marcus Liem vinit?

Rufus Coppertop
07-24-2010, 06:55 AM
Gutta cavat lapidem, non vi, sed saepe cadendo.... That's how my kids get what they want.


Drops wear away the stone, not by force, but by often falling.

Yep! It always worked for me.

Rufus Coppertop
07-24-2010, 07:00 AM
Hey, One, mine's a mocha choca, remember!!!

Rufus, first rule AW club -- you have no life outside of AW club. Second rule of AW club, well it involves a plastic pig, pegs and an elephant...:D you ever figure it out, let me know -- in Latin, of course!

I'm working on it.


Lol, it's just good to see posting back on here, hun. I know our One's missed you too. ;) Oh, and my kid got that tattoo :D

It is nice to be back. What tattoo did he end up getting?

Rufus Coppertop
07-24-2010, 07:01 AM
In the accusative case, I'd be Bartholomaeum?

Yes.

Rufus Coppertop
07-24-2010, 07:12 AM
Quid habes si Iehovah-testem ad Angelum-Inferni iungias?

Bartholomew
07-24-2010, 08:07 AM
Who... Inferno... test... if?

Yep. I dun speak the latins.

OneWriter
07-24-2010, 08:07 AM
Hey guys!

Wasn't it Cogito ergo sum? Oh, it's a joke!!!!

:roll:

Sorry, I'm slow....

OK, I give up: :flag:Can't find iungias in my dictionary.... :( To join? Wouldn't it be iungas though?

Ah, you baffled me again...

Rufus Coppertop
07-24-2010, 10:23 AM
Hey guys!

Wasn't it Cogito ergo sum? Oh, it's a joke!!!!

:roll:

Sorry, I'm slow....

OK, I give up: :flag:Can't find iungias in my dictionary.... :( To join? Wouldn't it be iungas though?

Ah, you baffled me again...

Whoops! You're right! 3rd conj present subjunctive is definitely iungas!

Dunno what the hell I was thinking! :rant:

Placentne pedes argillae meas tibi?

Rufus Coppertop
07-24-2010, 10:33 AM
Who... Inferno... test... if?

Yep. I dun speak the latins.

Quid habes si Iehovah-testem ad Angelum-Inferni iungas?

quid habes si - what do you have if

Iehovah-testem - a Jehovah's Witness

ad angelum-inferni - to a Hell's Angel

iungas - you join.

ANSWER

aliquis qui pulsat ad portam tuam et iubet te abfutuere. - Someone who knocks at your door and tells you to fuck off!

Liosse de Velishaf
07-24-2010, 10:54 AM
I didn't know the punchline, but I'm happy I was able to understand the set-up. Maybe I'm not as rusty as I thought. :)

Bartholomew
07-24-2010, 11:31 AM
Quid habes si Iehovah-testem ad Angelum-Inferni iungas?

quid habes si - what do you have if

Iehovah-testem - a Jehovah's Witness

ad angelum-inferni - to a Hell's Angel

iungas - you join.

ANSWER

aliquis qui pulsat ad portam tuam et iubet te abfutuere. - Someone who knocks at your door and tells you to fuck off!

Niiiice.

OneWriter
07-24-2010, 05:52 PM
aliquis qui pulsat ad portam tuam et iubet te abfutuere. - Someone who knocks at your door and tells you to fuck off!

Aliquis qui ad portam meam pulsat aut pecuniam aut animam meam salvam vult. Ego iubeo ipsum abfutuere!

OR

Si quis qui ad portam meam pulsat, aut pecuniam aut animam meam querit. Ego iubeo ipsum abfutuere!

Rufus Coppertop
07-24-2010, 06:26 PM
Aliquis qui pulsat ad portam meam aut pecuniam aut animam meam salvam volt. Ego iubeo ipsem abfuetere!

:roll:

Wants to save either your money or your soul?

Oh my! Yes!

Bonus est ut dicas istos nothos abfutuere!

That's just gorgeous!

OneWriter
07-24-2010, 06:45 PM
:roll:

Wants to save your money and your soul?

Oh my! Yes!

Bonus est ut dicas istum nothum abfutuere!

That's just gorgeous!

:evil

BTW, I'm glad you got to the post-coffee version.... The ante-coffee was pretty bad... I had completely forgotten the third person of volo is volt (or vult)... Man, I'm rusty!

Fallen
07-24-2010, 08:45 PM
I think names have lee-way. :)

So... how would an Asian have modified his name, if she got lost in ancient Rome?

Say her name is Li.

Marcus Liem vinit?

If it's a 'she'... then you maybe need 1st fem singular declension...?

nom: lia,
acc: liam,
gen: liae,
dat: liae,
abl: lia

Perhaps...? :D

*runs away very quickly in case it's wrong*

Fallen
07-24-2010, 08:51 PM
What tattoo did he end up getting?

Oh... one life, live it *covers face* and you're gonna ask me to say it in Latin -- and he ain't here for me to cheat!!!

He had the tattoo from elbow to wrist, looks really good!!!

OneWriter
07-24-2010, 11:43 PM
abfutuere

That is just precious! Why were we never taught these things in school??
Here's a bit more (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_profanity) on how much we missed in school.
Also, I suspect that if the verb was used in the same way as we use it today in Italy, it would be used in the passive tense, as in "i ut fututa/o sit"... Or would it be "i fututa/o esse"? (when you want to be offensive, as in "go get f...")

OK, I hope my Latin profanities won't get me banned....

Anyways, thanks, Rufus!!! Now I know that Catullus was just as bad-mouthed as me!!!! :D

Fallen
07-25-2010, 01:58 AM
:Jaw: Well, Miss One, they never taught me THAT at school :D

Psst, which one's the swear word, just purely for, erm, research purposes? I mean, it's not like I want to use it for when my in-laws come round so I can stop with the forced expletive deleted language, or anything -- honest :D

Rufus Coppertop
07-25-2010, 05:28 AM
If it's a 'she'... then you maybe need 1st fem singular declension...?

nom: lia,
acc: liam,
gen: liae,
dat: liae,
abl: lia

Perhaps...? :D

*runs away very quickly in case it's wrong*

Sarve, Ria sum et subdorum consirium habeo.

Rufus Coppertop
07-25-2010, 05:53 AM
That is just precious! Why were we never taught these things in school??
Here's a bit more (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_profanity) on how much we missed in school.
Also, I suspect that if the verb was used in the same way as we use it today in Italy, it would be used in the passive tense, as in "i ut fututa/o sit"... Or would it be "i fututa/o esse"? (when you want to be offensive, as in "go get f...")

OK, I hope my Latin profanities won't get me banned....

Anyways, thanks, Rufus!!! Now I know that Catullus was just as bad-mouthed as me!!!! :D

Catullus rocked.

Fututo as in, the future imperative? You had me going for a minute, I was thinking in terms of the perfect passive participle and wondering what the hell the 'o' was doing in there! :)

'futuaris' would also work in a purpose clause because it's 2nd person present passive subjunctive.

Rufus Coppertop
07-25-2010, 05:56 AM
:Jaw: Well, Miss One, they never taught me THAT at school :D

Psst, which one's the swear word, just purely for, erm, research purposes? I mean, it's not like I want to use it for when my in-laws come round so I can stop with the forced expletive deleted language, or anything -- honest :D

And we believe you too.

Seriously.

No, I mean it!

It's true, I swear.

Nah, really.

pssst - futuo. futuere. futui. fututum.

Spring
07-25-2010, 08:09 PM
Waving hello to all the Romans.
:)

I'm a Latin teacher. Nice to meet you all.

OneWriter
07-25-2010, 08:22 PM
Catullus rocked.

Fututo as in, the future imperative? You had me going for a minute, I was thinking in terms of the perfect passive participle and wondering what the hell the 'o' was doing in there! :)



You're right, sorry, it's me being dumb again, I'm so rusty I keep thinking in Spanish instead of Italian -- sorry. It happened to me in France too, I kept WANTING to speak French and all it came out was Spanish.

Anyways, my mistake: I'm trying to translate from the Italian "vai a farti fottere"... --which basically means go get laid, but that's how we say fuck off, which now I know Catullus used too, so it's not such a bad thing to say.... :)

So what would it be: i ut fututus/fututa sis ? Or es/esto fututus? (imperative of sum)... Or i fututus esse ?

Rufus Coppertop
07-25-2010, 08:23 PM
Waving hello to all the Romans.
:)

I'm a Latin teacher. Nice to meet you all.

Salve. Tu gratus hic est. Ludum habeamus.

BTW - if you notice any holes in my grammar or syntax, please feel free to point them out.

OneWriter
07-25-2010, 08:23 PM
Waving hello to all the Romans.
:)

I'm a Latin teacher. Nice to meet you all.

Hi there! :hi:

Welcome, and never mind teh conversation we're having right now... It's rated R for the school!!! :D

Rufus Coppertop
07-25-2010, 08:39 PM
You're right, sorry, it's me being dumb again, I'm so rusty I keep thinking in Spanish instead of Italian -- sorry. It happened to me in France too, I kept WANTING to speak French and all it came out was Spanish.

Anyways, my mistake: I'm trying to translate from the Italian "vai a farti fottere"... --which basically means go get laid, but that's how we say fuck off, which now I know Catullus used too, so it's not such a bad thing to say.... :)

So what would it be: i ut fututus/fututa sis ? Or es/esto fututus? (imperative of sum)...

Well actually, I didn't think you were being dumb. I sort of took it as a purpose clause with a future imperative but all of a sudden, puto fortasse paulo stultus eram. I don't think imperatives work in a purpose clause.

So, i ut futuaris. Go, that you might be fucked. Present subjunctive passive with imperative 'i'.

second person present passive forms in the singular, can also look just like the infinitive, so 'i futuere' is another possibility which seems deliciously informal.

Anyway, I need to have a ciggy and go to bed. I might not be back for a couple of days. Labor cras mihi clamat.

OneWriter
07-25-2010, 08:49 PM
Brilliant, thanks! I was stuck in thinking that ut wanted the subjunctive...
Bonum tempus (OR horam bonam?) in labore habeas (?). Si quis te irritatum agit, ipsum abfutuere iube!!! :D

OK, sorry, I'm sure that's a ton of mistakes... Have a good time, see you when you come back! :hi:

ETA: found first of ton of mistakes...

Rufus Coppertop
07-25-2010, 09:02 PM
Brilliant, thanks! I was stuck in thinking that ut wanted the subjunctive...
Bonus tempus in labore habeas (?). Si quis te irritatum agit, ipsum abfutuere iube!!! :D

OK, sorry, I'm sure that's a ton of mistakes... Have a good time, see you when you come back! :hi:

:D
Id prorsus iubebo.

Fallen
07-26-2010, 12:27 AM
Waving hello to all the Romans.
:)

I'm a Latin teacher. Nice to meet you all.

Good to meet you, Spring!!!!

Chase
07-27-2010, 04:23 AM
I'm old enough to remember being an altar boy when masses were said in Latin. Deaf now, I recall loving the sounds but sadly only learned a few words.

I scanned this thread and couldn't find "Illigitimi non carborundum" or "Nur illigitimus carborundum." I'm sure I butchered both spelling and wording, but a favorite old monsignor used to say it, though he never told us it meant "Don't let the bastards grind you down."

Anyway, pay me no mind. I'm just hanging out here to impress an Italian chick I know who lives somewhere on the New Mexican high desert.

OneWriter
07-27-2010, 09:12 AM
I'm old enough to remember being an altar boy when masses were said in Latin. Deaf now, I recall loving the sounds but sadly only learned a few words.

I scanned this thread and couldn't find "Illigitimi non carborundum" or "Nur illigitimus carborundum." I'm sure I butchered both spelling and wording, but a favorite old monsignor used to say it, though he never told us it meant "Don't the bastards grind you down."

Anyway, pay me no mind. I'm just hanging out here to impress an Italian chick I know who lives somewhere on the New Mexican high desert.


:Hug2:

Oooh.... I LOVE it! I just wrote it down along with Rufus' instructional posts!!
This thread is getting deliciously mischievous!!!
The Latin I never learned and I always wanted to! :D

SaraP
07-27-2010, 09:17 AM
*giggles*

OneWriter
07-27-2010, 09:19 AM
Eeeek! :scared: Sara's here!!!
*** runs back to chat room ***

SaraP
07-27-2010, 09:28 AM
:D

I think this thread is a LOT of fun.

Rufus Coppertop
07-27-2010, 06:46 PM
Is anyone using Latin in their WIP's?

OneWriter
07-27-2010, 07:30 PM
Hey there, you're back!

I have a "geeky" doctor patronizing people in Latin. :)
That's why for a while I researched Latin proverbs. There's a wealth on Wikipedia.

You?

Rufus Coppertop
07-28-2010, 06:04 AM
Hey there, you're back!

I have a "geeky" doctor patronizing people in Latin. :)
That's why for a while I researched Latin proverbs. There's a wealth on Wikipedia.

You?

I have an inscription on the plinth of a statue of Boadicea V (empress of Rome) and a wanker lawyer telling a werewolf that diplomatic immunity will indeed protect him from prosecution ob mingentem in locum publicum dum transfiguratum in formam lupinam.

OneWriter
07-28-2010, 09:40 AM
Intellexi illum versipellem esse, nec postea cum illo panem gustare potui, non si me occidisses. (Petronius - Satyricon LXII)

Sorry, you got me curious and I googled "werewolf" and "Latin".

C.bronco
07-28-2010, 09:42 AM
Agriculi?

matdonna
07-28-2010, 09:48 AM
My Latin is very rusty. But as my daughter is studying it, her father-in-law sent her this little ditty the other day. Try reading with a bit of a Cockney accent. :-)

Brutus et erat forte
Ceasar ad sum jam
Brutus sic in omnibus
Ceasar sic in tram

C.bronco
07-28-2010, 09:52 AM
We used to do fake translations of Latin poetry. it was a lot of fun.

Rufus Coppertop
07-29-2010, 01:41 PM
Intellexi illum versipellem esse, nec postea cum illo panem gustare potui, non si me occidisses. (Petronius - Satyricon LXII)

Sorry, you got me curious and I googled "werewolf" and "Latin".



I came up with virlupinus. I like versipellis more.

Come here, Sugarchops! Kissy kissy! :Hug2:

OneWriter
07-29-2010, 05:24 PM
:roll:


OK, seriously now: what about that 400K novel of mine you promised to beta read in return????

:D

Fallen
07-29-2010, 07:47 PM
Is anyone using Latin in their WIP's?

Kind of...my main mc not having been home for a few thousand years (hey, it happens), he's forgotten the majority of his Latin-based tongue. But for anyone close to him, (girlfriend etc) he has an unconscious habit of slipping in the odd declension into his English sentences. Not sure whether it works or not yet...

Fallen
07-30-2010, 03:24 AM
I'm old enough to remember being an altar boy when masses were said in Latin. Deaf now, I recall loving the sounds but sadly only learned a few words.

I scanned this thread and couldn't find "Illigitimi non carborundum" or "Nur illigitimus carborundum." I'm sure I butchered both spelling and wording, but a favorite old monsignor used to say it, though he never told us it meant "Don't let the bastards grind you down."

Anyway, pay me no mind. I'm just hanging out here to impress an Italian chick I know who lives somewhere on the New Mexican high desert.

Hey, Chase hun, is there any chance that's the proper spelling up there? I'd like to store it for future use! ;)

Ruf, anyone...? Is it right?

OneWriter
07-30-2010, 03:53 AM
Hey, Chase hun, is there any chance that's the proper spelling up there? I'd like to store it for future use! ;)

Ruf, anyone...? Is it right?


Here's what I found:

Illegitimi non carborundum (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illegitimi_non_carborundum)

Ha, you wanna use it too, huh???? ;)

Fallen
07-30-2010, 04:28 AM
:e2file: Huh? Wanna fight for it, huh - huh :box: :box:


:e2flowers: thank you, hun!!! I think it's a fantastic quote. I'm gonna put it over the door when the in-laws come. You've not met them yet, have you, hun? Oh, here they come... :mob:


Edit: It would make a great one for the rejection thread too!!! Lol

Chase
07-30-2010, 05:21 AM
Thanks, One (and only) Writer. I was hoping a Latin scholar would school us.

Fallen
07-30-2010, 05:26 AM
Looks like you were pretty spot-on, Chase! Our One's a smart little lass.

OneWriter
07-30-2010, 05:47 AM
Looks like you were pretty spot-on, Chase! Our One's a smart little lass.

:Jaw:

oooh..... *** blinks numerous times ***

oooh..... sorry, my dyslexia.... I thought you wrote I was a smart little ass... *** turns around and checks ***

well, it's not big for sure....

OneWriter
07-30-2010, 05:51 AM
Thanks, One (and only) Writer. I was hoping a Latin scholar would school us.

Troppo buono, Mr. Chase.... :Sun:

So, where's the scholar? :e2writer:

Fallen
07-30-2010, 06:36 AM
:Jaw:

oooh..... *** blinks numerous times ***

oooh..... sorry, my dyslexia.... I thought you wrote I was a smart little ass... *** turns around and checks ***

well, it's not big for sure....


:roll:

Rufus Coppertop
07-30-2010, 02:54 PM
Non permitte anos trahere te deorsum!

Non trahi deorsum ab culis!

OneWriter
07-30-2010, 06:20 PM
Non permitte anos trahere te deorsum!

Non trahi deorsum ab culis!

Rufus, tua scientia magna est. Ubi hunc modum dicendi reperisti?

Rufus Coppertop
07-31-2010, 06:38 PM
Rufus, tua scientia magna est. Ubi hunc modum dicendi reperisti?

Gratias tibi do quamvis augeas fortasse peritiam meam. Egi trios annos in academia et continuo studere ad domi pro voluptatem.

Actually, noli trahi deorsum ab culis is probably better than non trahi.

OneWriter
07-31-2010, 07:50 PM
So, you made it up or did you find it used somewhere? It is a modus dicendi, isn't it?
If you found it somewhere, do you remember the quote?

Tuam peritiam non augeo: look at your beautiful use of quamvis! :)

Rufus Coppertop
08-01-2010, 05:30 AM
So, you made it up or did you find it used somewhere? It is a modus dicendi, isn't it?
If you found it somewhere, do you remember the quote?

Tuam peritiam non augeo: look at your beautiful use of quamvis! :)

Thanks for that! :D

As for the "don't be brought down by arseholes," thing, I made that one up as well as the great old Aussie classic, futu me ad mortem.

Oh my gawds! Did I really write pro voluptatem?

Pro takes ablative. I should have said pro voluptate!

Fallen? Where's that whip of yours?

OneWriter
08-05-2010, 05:48 AM
I'm back, because this thread is a lot of fun and it's too bad to leave it dormant. And since the fun has been looking at the Latin we (or at least I) have never learned in school, I have a new tidbit to talk about: the word prostitute. So, in Latin they used to say "meretrix" which comes from the verb "mereo" = to earn. Now, even though today in Italian we do have the word "meretrice", it's not that popular and in fact it is highly formal. For bitch, we say puttana, in Spanish puta. And here's where it gets interesting (yeah, Fallen, I can see you snickering back there... true, I still need a better day job, you're right!!!): it's an oxymoron! Well, not that it was intended to be, but puta and puttana come from putus, puta, putum which means pure. In the old days puta was used for girl in general.... Ha. Funny how words can change their meanings like that.

Anyways, sorry, I guess I just turned the "fun" thread into a very boring lesson... ** yawns ** Well, it is a dead language, isn't it?

Fallen
08-05-2010, 06:21 AM
Completely strange but true here, One. We were having our heating system fixed a few months ago and this lovely young chap starts tinkering with our wiring. I'm sitting there reading my books and he peers over and sez, 'Latin, is it?'

I nodded. He tapped my work sheet and said 'you've got that declension wrong.' I look up and he starts reciting 1st fem, 2nd m etc, and then comes out with a few lines of Latin.

After trying to bribe him to sit my Latin exam (thought he'd look good in my stockings and suspenders), I was left, well, :Jaw: .

Just knocked me for six a bit... I didn't expect to hear it spoken in my kitchen.

Fallen
08-05-2010, 06:29 AM
Fallen? Where's that whip of yours?

Oooooooooooh, he just has to ask...:D

:e2moon: :whip:

Chase
08-05-2010, 06:33 PM
Just a Latin learner checking in. I have a terrific critique partner who loves to leave a PS: postscriptum. We use Latin every day and seldom notice it, don't we?

Fallen
08-05-2010, 07:07 PM
Too true, Chase. Look at 'am', 'pm' (anti/post meridem (and, yep, spelling is more than likely wrong there)), then you have 'video' (I see) 'exit' (he/she leaves), i.e. (is that id est...? That is...) so, so many... :D

OneWriter
08-06-2010, 05:56 AM
Just a Latin learner checking in. I have a terrific critique partner who loves to leave a PS: postscriptum. We use Latin every day and seldom notice it, don't we?

My beta (whose absolutely awesome and don't ask me who he is because I'm NOT sharing!!!) loves the phrase mea culpa. 'Course, I have no idea where he gets that from!!! ;)

ETA: I wanna add another one just because I see it misspelled so many times it makes me cringe: ad nauseAM
not ad nauseUM, nausea is feminine!!!

Oh, and isn't it weird that conundrum has nothing to do with Latin? Shouldn't we just add it to the Latin vocabulary just because it should be there??? (apparently it's pseudo-Latin.... )

Rufus Coppertop
08-06-2010, 05:59 AM
I love the idea of an electrician who studied/studies Latin.

It makes me optimistic about the world and humanity's future.

Rufus Coppertop
08-06-2010, 06:00 AM
Oooooooooooh, he just has to ask...:D

:e2moon: :whip:

:Hug2:

OneWriter
08-06-2010, 06:05 AM
:Hug2:

Wait a sec.... Rufus, she whips you and you hug her???
Mannnn, here's what you need:


:box: :flamethrower :mob :e2fight:

PS for Fallen: Me luvz ya!!! :e2flowers

OneWriter
08-06-2010, 08:36 AM
Aliquando et insanire iucundum est.

mscelina
08-06-2010, 08:53 AM
I'm back, because this thread is a lot of fun and it's too bad to leave it dormant. And since the fun has been looking at the Latin we (or at least I) have never learned in school, I have a new tidbit to talk about: the word prostitute. So, in Latin they used to say "meretrix" which comes from the verb "mereo" = to earn. Now, even though today in Italian we do have the word "meretrice", it's not that popular and in fact it is highly formal. For bitch, we say puttana, in Spanish puta. And here's where it gets interesting (yeah, Fallen, I can see you snickering back there... true, I still need a better day job, you're right!!!): it's an oxymoron! Well, not that it was intended to be, but puta and puttana come from putus, puta, putum which means pure. In the old days puta was used for girl in general.... Ha. Funny how words can change their meanings like that.

Anyways, sorry, I guess I just turned the "fun" thread into a very boring lesson... ** yawns ** Well, it is a dead language, isn't it?

Funny, too--at every Latin convention there's always some poor girl whose mother thought that yellow cotton would make a wonderful tunic, completely unuaware that she will doom her daughter to the title 'meretrix' throughout the rest of her JCL career.

Not that I would know of course. What can I say? I turned my mad Latin skills to all sorts of mischief in the day.

And in France Anne Boleyn was referred to as 'la putaine' just to add in more useless trivia.

There you go.

OneWriter
08-06-2010, 06:40 PM
Aliquando et insanire iucundum est.

Hey, Rufus, here's another one for you: why is there an "et" in there? What for? I mean, I know the above is correct because it's a famous phrase (was it Seneca?), but shouldn't it be "aliquando insanire icundum est"?

Rufus Coppertop
08-06-2010, 06:41 PM
Aliquando et insanire iucundum est.

Cogito ut fere omnium nostrum hic latratus insanus simus! Sic iocum ludosque habemus.

Chasing the Horizon
08-06-2010, 07:16 PM
mscelina, you're echoing. ;)

I want to learn to read and write Latin and thought you guys could recommend some books to get me started. I want something that concentrates on teaching vocabulary and reading comprehension, not grammar to begin with. That's the order in which I learned English and it seems to have worked out well (plus learning new words and reading sentences is more interesting that studying grammar and makes you feel like you're making better progress).

Also, where can I get some books (preferably mythology) written in Latin? That's how I learned to read English, by looking at the books until they made sense.

If anyone's curious, the reason I chose Latin (instead of some more useful 'living' language) is because after experimenting with learning snippets of a dozen different languages the Latin came easiest, probably because it's the root of English. And the only reason I want to learn a foreign language is to prove I can (and for fun :D ).

Rufus Coppertop
08-06-2010, 07:44 PM
Hey, Rufus, here's another one for you: why is there an "et" in there? What for? I mean, I know the above is correct because it's a famous phrase (was it Seneca?), but shouldn't it be "aliquando insanire icundum est"?

Indicium non habeo. I was actually going to ask you the same thing, but assumed you'd made it up and the 'et' was a typo!

Et can mean also or even. Maybe a good translation would be, sometimes it is even pleasant to be mad.

OneWriter
08-06-2010, 07:51 PM
That makes perfect sense! Amicus, you're good! :)

Tu auges peritiam meam: omnia quae scio iam scripta aut dicta fuit.
(Unless it's wrong in which case I take full copyrights!!!)

Rufus Coppertop
08-06-2010, 07:52 PM
I want something that concentrates on teaching vocabulary and reading comprehension, not grammar to begin with.

The trouble is, you'll need grammar to comprehend the vocabulary.

If you know that ama is to do with love, you'll still need to know the forms it takes in the six tenses of the indicative, the four of the subjunctive, the imperative forms, the infinitives in their active perfect, present and future tenses plus the same in the passive tenses.

You'll need to know your grammar to know whether a noun is the subject, direct object or indirect object of the sentence.


Also, where can I get some books (preferably mythology) written in Latin?

Ovid is good. You'll need to be good at Latin though and that includes grammar.


If anyone's curious, the reason I chose Latin (instead of some more useful 'living' language) is because after experimenting with learning snippets of a dozen different languages the Latin came easiest, probably because it's the root of English. And the only reason I want to learn a foreign language is to prove I can (and for fun :D ).

Latin is fun. Learn the grammar. Potes id agere!

OneWriter
08-06-2010, 07:56 PM
I want something that concentrates on teaching vocabulary and reading comprehension, not grammar to begin with. That's the order in which I learned English and it seems to have worked out well (plus learning new words and reading sentences is more interesting that studying grammar and makes you feel like you're making better progress).



English grammar is non-existent compared to Latin. Plus, English is a "live" language, which means you can hear people speak it and learn. With Latin, you have to read it and if you don't know the grammar you can't understand it. So listen to Rufus: get a good grammar book, start with first declension and first conjugation and keep going. And come over here and tell us about the progress... We'll make it more fun and less boring for you!!! :D

Fallen
08-07-2010, 12:45 AM
I agree with Rufus and One, ChasingTH. Learning Grammar, vocab...it should all go hand in hand where Latin is concerned:) English is my one and only tongue, (I know Latin from the course I took but I'm far, far, far, FAR, from fluent). Learning English and Latin...one is not like the other.

When was taught the little I know, it started with the very basics, 1st and 2nd declension, and present conjugation. I'd have a Latin text that focusd on those hose basics and we'd be asked to translate. But you had to know the declension and conjugation of the nouns and verbs in oreder to translate.

I've still got my text books. I'll pass on the course reader names when I get home. :)

But it's a beautiful language and a good choice. ;)

OneWriter
08-07-2010, 07:42 PM
So, do you guys know what labor limae means? Chase?
It's what I'm doing right now to my ms. :(

Rufus Coppertop
08-07-2010, 09:29 PM
Tu auges peritiam meam: omnia quae scio iam scripta aut dicta fuit.

Noli vendere te curtum. Nonne composuisti hoc?

Rufus Coppertop
08-07-2010, 09:36 PM
So, do you guys know what labor limae means? Chase?
It's what I'm doing right now to my ms. :(

You're revising. Well done!

Debeo extrahere digitum e culum meum ut laborem limae quoque agat.

OneWriter
08-07-2010, 09:42 PM
Debeo extrahere digitum e culum meum ut laborem limae quoque agat.

:roll:

It's not bad. It's just the feeling of being done but not quite finished yet... Sort of like Penelope's shroud...

Is labor limae used in every day English, do you know? Like modus operandi and ad nauseam and and all those common phrases? You hear it a lot in Italian.

Rufus Coppertop
08-07-2010, 09:50 PM
:roll:

It's not bad. It's just the feeling of being done but not quite finished yet... Sort of like Penelope's shroud...

Is labor limae used in every day English, do you know? Like modus operandi and ad nauseam and and all those common phrases? You hear it a lot in Italian.

I've never come across it before.

Rufus Coppertop
08-07-2010, 09:51 PM
:roll:

:evil

OneWriter
08-07-2010, 09:52 PM
OOOHHHH! Look at your shiny new avatar!!! Wicked!!!!

So, labor limae comes after revising, technically... It's more like "perfecting" and smoothing all the odd angles and all that sort of stuff... That's why it feels like Penelope's shroud... We have a saying in Tuscany, that from a wooden plank you end up making a door knob.... !!! :D (and then you have to start over!)

Rufus Coppertop
08-07-2010, 09:56 PM
OOOHHHH! Look at your shiny new avatar!!! Wicked!!!!

Thought you'd like it!:)

SaraP
08-07-2010, 09:56 PM
OOOHHHH! Look at your shiny new avatar!!! Wicked!!!!

And here I was expecting a comment on Rufus' new avatar in latin. Tsk tsk.

Rufus Coppertop
08-07-2010, 09:59 PM
And here I was expecting a comment on Rufus' new avatar in latin. Tsk tsk.

It'll come!

Rufus Coppertop
08-07-2010, 10:01 PM
Any minute now ....

OneWriter
08-07-2010, 10:07 PM
And here I was expecting a comment on Rufus' new avatar in latin. Tsk tsk.

Ow, Sara!!! How the heck do I say avatar in Latin??? Mhm, that's challenging... Imago simulata? :idea:

SIGNUM!!! Rufus, novum signum tuum pulchrum est!

OK, now I expect an applause... and a flood of rep points to say the least. :e2file:

Rufus Coppertop
08-07-2010, 10:17 PM
:hooray::Clap::e2dance:

OneWriter
08-07-2010, 10:24 PM
:D Oh, and I love your quote too!! Very cool. So, what would you have come up with for avatar???

Rufus Coppertop
08-07-2010, 10:29 PM
:D Oh, and I love the quote too!! Very cool. So, what would you have come up with for avatar???

Legatulus might work. Legatus for "deputy", "ambassador" and ulus as the diminutive suffix.

Quasi Legatulus, signulum?

Actually, I think signum is just fine.

I'm having too much fun to go to bed, but it is three in the morning here.

Somnia pulchra omnibus. I'll be back tomorrow.

OneWriter
08-07-2010, 11:03 PM
I would have never thought of legatulus.
Altum intellectum habes!

Three?? Wow, between you and Fallen I'm surrounded by insomniacs!!!
Well, somnia pulchra to you then!!

Fallen
08-07-2010, 11:22 PM
Oh, habes, you have -- and I didn't have to look it up. Intellectum speaks for itself, Altum...gotta be a modifier of some sorts, but what?

Honestly, my Latin hated me too... :D

Insommnia... *chuckles* What time is it Ruf's end? And in Latin, I know there's a declension of qui in there somewhere, 'est' 'timeo' is I fear, so I can't cheat with that...

I'm useless at this... :)

OneWriter
08-07-2010, 11:25 PM
At least you have the insomnia as an excuse... By the time I get here I've had plenty of sleep and coffee!!! :D

Rufus Coppertop
08-08-2010, 07:02 AM
At least you have the insomnia as an excuse... By the time I get here I've had plenty of sleep and coffee!!! :D

I can at least blame tiredness for e culum meum.

"e culo meo!" it should have been.

Which part of ex/e takes ablative didn't I understand?

And I didn't end up sleeping well. Damn!

GeorgeK
08-08-2010, 07:41 AM
I never even had the option of studying Latin in school...

I've always wondered what "Veni vidi vici" means. Any help?

I slid on the scene, laid my orbs on em and done em the big hurt...I'm quoting the guy in the loud shirt who sat behind me in the 70's. It's actually rather colorful if you consider the character that Hairy was.

GeorgeK
08-08-2010, 07:54 AM
Quid habes si Iehovah-testem ad Angelum-Inferni iungas?

quid habes si - what do you have if

Iehovah-testem - a Jehovah's Witness

ad angelum-inferni - to a Hell's Angel

iungas - you join.

ANSWER

aliquis qui pulsat ad portam tuam et iubet te abfutuere. - Someone who knocks at your door and tells you to fuck off!


I was trying to translate this to my son ut explain why I was laughing because I'd assumed a much more litteral definition of testem, and in the process of explaining it he quipped, "If a Hell's Angel had one of God's testicles, he'd probably do more than that."

and shouldn't it be Iehovahi, or something like that?

OneWriter
08-08-2010, 08:21 AM
I can at least blame tiredness for e culum meum.

"e culo meo!" it should have been.

Which part of ex/e takes ablative didn't I understand?

And I didn't end up sleeping well. Damn!

'Course not... You had that little thing nagging at you, going, "hey, Ruf, pssst, hey! It's e culo, pssst....!!!!"

.... here, flowers to you too: :e2flowers

BTW, I'm just curious: is it Monday morning there or Sunday morning?

Rufus Coppertop
08-08-2010, 10:42 AM
'Course not... You had that little thing nagging at you, going, "hey, Ruf, pssst, hey! It's e culo, pssst....!!!!"

.... here, flowers to you too: :e2flowers

Danke beaucoups senora. :e2kissy:


BTW, I'm just curious: is it Monday morning there or Sunday morning?Sunday.

Rufus Coppertop
08-08-2010, 11:04 AM
I was trying to translate this to my son ut explain why I was laughing because I'd assumed a much more litteral definition of testem, and in the process of explaining it he quipped, "If a Hell's Angel had one of God's testicles, he'd probably do more than that."

and shouldn't it be Iehovahi, or something like that?

I'm sorry you asked. My ecclesiastical dictionary just doesn't have it which is why I decided to go with an appositional phrase (which is possibly not legit in this instance).

What to do?

I rang up a presbytery where they do the tridentine rite and left a message for the priests. Hopefully they'll ring up soon and tell me whether "Iehovah" is indeclinable or whether we can put it in the third declension.

Rufus Coppertop
08-08-2010, 03:20 PM
and shouldn't it be Iehovahi, or something like that?

Being a corruption of a Hebrew word YHVH, it's indeclinable in Latin. That's according to a priest who does the tridentine mass.

That means an appositional phrase is it unless anyone else has ideas.

GeorgeK
08-08-2010, 05:20 PM
Thanks, I was wondering if the Hebrew would throw it off, but it's been so long.

Clio
08-08-2010, 05:40 PM
SIGNUM!!! Rufus, novum signum tuum pulchrum est!

OK, now I expect an applause... and a flood of rep points to say the least. :e2file:

Shock horror! Rufe, novum signum tuum pulchrum est! ;) As you're addressing him...ahem... :D

Fallen
08-08-2010, 06:16 PM
Ahhh, ye old vocatives... et tu, Brute?

What would the vocative to Jacky be in Latin? (was 'y' part of the Latin alphabet? I know 'v' is pronouned as 'w' so veni vidi vici, would be spoken as 'weni, widi, wici'... hmmm)

Rufus Coppertop
08-08-2010, 06:27 PM
Ahhh, ye old vocatives... et tu, Brute?

What would the vocative to Jacky be in Latin? (was 'y' part of the Latin alphabet? I know 'v' is pronouned as 'w' so veni vidi vici, would be spoken as 'weni, widi, wici'... hmmm)

Iackia if feminine - first declension vocative is the same as nominative.

Iacke if masculine - second declension vocative substitutes an e for the us.

OneWriter
08-08-2010, 07:48 PM
Shock horror! Rufe, novum signum tuum pulchrum est! ;) As you're addressing him...ahem... :D

Thanks.... If you get shocked so easily don't go through the whole thread... I decline any responsibility and claim immunity based on.... on.... The fact that it's a dead language!! There. ;)

OneWriter
08-08-2010, 09:42 PM
Danke beaucoups senora.

What a beautiful language medley!
Que mezcla di lingue pulchra et tres jolie, mein Freund....

Clio
08-08-2010, 10:39 PM
Non dimenticare la lingua piu bella, Scrivatore :D

Sorry my keyboard won't do the accent over that 'u'.

What a lovely thread....

OneWriter
08-08-2010, 10:43 PM
Non dimenticare la lingua piu bella, Scrivatore :D



psst.... Scrittore.... o Scrittrice, in my case....

... says the one who wrote Rufus instead of Rufe... Heh, it's these damn keyboards, ya know?? Everything's right before it gets to the keyboard!!!! :D

ETA: a parte quello, sono ovviamente d'accordo che sia la lingua piu' bella!!! Abbiamo perfezionato il Latino, he he he...

Fallen
08-09-2010, 06:09 AM
Iackia if feminine - first declension vocative is the same as nominative.

Iacke if masculine - second declension vocative substitutes an e for the us.

The fem looks a hell of a lot better than the English (Jacky). Thank you for looking at that, hun. ;)

OneWriter
08-10-2010, 04:43 AM
Oh, there's such a sweet Latin proverb I wanna share: I was down today and my sweetie sent me an email: SURSUM CORDA!! So cute.... So, if you guys are a bit down too, SURSUM CORDA everyone!!!!

SaraP
08-10-2010, 04:53 AM
Hey, I know that from somewhere ... what's it mean?

OneWriter
08-10-2010, 05:02 AM
From church, most likely... It means "lift up your heart"... It's cute, isn't it? If you've gone to church all your life chances are you've lost the sense of it, but I haven't been going in a while so it rings new and heart-lifting to me!!! :)

Rufus Coppertop
08-12-2010, 06:28 AM
Sursum corda rocks.

Chase
08-13-2010, 04:38 AM
For post number 1,000 (M, to this bunch), I changed avatar.

My sister and I used to crack up at this old sign by Montana School for the Deaf. She'd point to me, and I'd point to her.

For the Latin saying, I put two phrases together I recall from long ago when I could hear. They're in sore need of correction, I'm sure. It's supposed to say "If silence is gold(en), I'm rich."

OneWriter
08-13-2010, 04:53 AM
Hi Chase!! Woo-hoo, congratulations on the 1,000 post!!! :partyguy:

OK, let's check out your Latin up there... Mhm... Wow, beautiful, my friend!
Ha, and I thought uber was German!!! :D

OneWriter
08-13-2010, 06:16 PM
Hey Chase, you didn't comment on my Latin phrase "labor limae"... I put it up for you, isn't that your job?? :D

Chase
08-13-2010, 09:03 PM
Hey Chase, you didn't comment on my Latin phrase "labor limae"... I put it up for you, isn't that your job?? :D

Sorry. I even went back a page and couldn't find the comment in any context. My Latin is so bad that I can only come up with: "to sink a file" or "to file a sink," none of which are in my job description. So do I have to go sit in the corner and wear the pointy hat?


I slid on the scene, laid my orbs on 'em, and done 'em the big hurt.

Best translation I've ever heard of "Veni vidi vici."

OneWriter
08-13-2010, 10:17 PM
So do I have to go sit in the corner and wear the pointy hat?


'Course not!!! I was just curious as to whether it is used at all here....
Friend, you've been raised too rigidly!!! Tsk, tsk, that tough Catholic education... ;)

Anyways, literally it means "file labor", which is what one does when they go back and meticulously re-edit a manuscript... That's why I thought of you!

:e2flowers

Chase
08-14-2010, 05:35 AM
Went to the VA clinic this Friday the thirteenth. I fear I-5, so I sneaked into Eugene on old highway 99.

Still, the big-city traffic was almost too much for this farm boy. Imagine my gratitude when I saw some kind souls knew I’d be lost and erected a big sign with my name on it to lead the way:

http://i523.photobucket.com/albums/w355/chasenott/001.jpg

To stay in theme, "Chase" in Latin is "Fugo."

OneWriter
08-15-2010, 08:00 PM
Went to the VA clinic this Friday the thirteenth. I fear I-5, so I sneaked into Eugene on old highway 99.

Still, the big-city traffic was almost too much for this farm boy. Imagine my gratitude when I saw some kind souls knew I’d be lost and erected a big sign with my name on it to lead the way:

To stay in theme, "Chase" in Latin is "Fugo."

Chase -- how funny. You do have a famous name!! In fact, I get not one, but two letters from you every month. And you're always asking for money... And if I don't pay I get in real trouble... Man, what a demanding friend!!!! ;)

OneWriter
08-18-2010, 08:14 AM
I just thought of another Latin word we often use in Italian: lapsus. I am a lapsus queen. I make them all the time. I had a teacher in high school who used to say lapis instead, which is hilarious because lapis actually means pencil. It was a lapsus linguae within a lapsus linguae. Sort of Chinese boxes or Russian dolls...

SaraP
08-18-2010, 03:25 PM
We say lapis instead of lapso, as a joke, ALL the time in my family. :D

OneWriter
08-18-2010, 06:37 PM
You know, come to think of it, maybe she was joking. But she knew so little Latin (even though that's what she was teaching), that we laughed out loud every time she said lapis. So you guys say "lapso"?

SaraP
08-18-2010, 07:57 PM
Lapso is a misundertanding/oversight/error/etc. Lapis (or rather lápis) is a pencil.

We love to play with words. My hubby is particularly fond of saying something was a tauromachyc experience (get it? traumatic?). :D

Fallen
08-19-2010, 09:45 PM
Hey, Chase, you'd love it round my area. We live in Cannock Chase, where we have Cannock Chase high school, Cannock Chase hospital, Chase school of motoring; you even get Chase stickers, mugs and hats!!! :D

OneWriter
08-19-2010, 10:03 PM
Hey, Chase, you'd love it round my area. We live in Cannock Chase, where we have Cannock Chase high school, Cannock Chase hospital, Chase school of motoring; you even get Chase stickers, mugs and hats!!! :D

How funny! Chase HAS to come visit you Fallen. Chase, you have to take a pic of you with a Chase hat, holding a Chase mug, underneath the Cannock Chase sign -- how's THAT for an avatar? :D

Chase
08-20-2010, 12:35 AM
We live in Cannock Chase . . .

Fallen, thanks so much. Your area of England sounds terrific. The paranormal sightings are most interesting: ghosts, werewolves, devils, sabertooths, UFOs -- all of my interests. Ha ha ha, "dogging" sounds interesting, too.

My last name is that of a well-known English city, and it also has a chase (hunt club).

Chase, a transplanted Brit

Fallen
08-20-2010, 02:27 AM
The paranormal sightings are most interesting: ghosts, werewolves, devils, sabertooths, UFOs

Well, I have to let my kids out SOMETIME, can I help it if they keep making the headlines :D

We even get have gigs in the park too, so y'all have to come on over. We have a lovely place known as Castle Ring that dates back to the Romans (phew, I had to bring in Latin link somewhere).

Dogging... oh yeah, :D Nowt like local yocal stuff to drive you nuts.

Chase
08-20-2010, 05:09 AM
Love your sense of humor, Fallen. Mine is supposed to come from my British ancestors.

My avatar line was too cluttered, so I shortened it.

Chase Snot Enge Ham (smart people's home)

Chase
09-06-2010, 03:41 AM
I was the last poster? Time to bump this up with Latin trivia:

Just discovered what everybody else already knew. Rx, the symbol we used to see on drug stores, is the Latin abbreviation for recipere -- recipe to us Englishers.

MJNL
01-24-2011, 11:10 PM
I've got a translation question!

I'm looking to translate one of the inscriptions on the entrance to the Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. It reads: Spes illorum immortalitate plena est.


I've looked at several on-line translators and Google-Translate is the only thing that's given me something that makes sense: Their hope is full of immortality.


Sounds good to me, but I want to make sure it's correct before using the translation in my WIP.


Thanks so much!

OneWriter
01-24-2011, 11:21 PM
Your translation looks correct to me. I'll let others weigh in too. :)

Of course, the above is a literal translation; you may consider rendering it in better English in your WIP, or not, depending on your specific needs.

ETA: it looks like it's from the Book of Wisdom?

MJNL
01-25-2011, 01:13 AM
Thank you!

Rufus Coppertop
01-25-2011, 08:42 PM
It's weird though because immortalitate is ablative, not genitive. You'd think it would mean "with immortality" rather than "of immortality" but the Dhouay Rheims translates it as a genitive and the DR is supposedly the most accurate translation of the Vulgate.

OneWriter
01-25-2011, 09:02 PM
Hey, Rufus! I've been wondering when you'd show up!! ;)
I was puzzled at first too, but then I checked it: plenus can be used with the ablative, too, it appears, with the same meaning. I found a few examples, like "ingenio et lumine plenus"...

Rufus Coppertop
01-26-2011, 04:40 AM
Ah haa! That never occurred to me!

Gratias tibi do. :Hug2:

Rufus Coppertop
01-26-2011, 12:02 PM
Fallen,

You never told me there were ghosts, werewolves and devils and stuff getting about your district! :rant: Man, I really must renew my passport!

rockinhorseman
02-19-2011, 07:48 PM
My curiosity about relationships, inspiration’ships, endeavor’ships, has been distilled enough over time to render a simply put question. I have been trying for a very long time to “know”, as to realize- insight, as well as to fathom the implications of the “ships” thing in regards to late 19th century poets, painters, musicians, and illusionists-illustrators. What was it that brought the men and woman of that “life and times” together in weaving the tapestry of Edwardian/Elizabethian English court cultural expressionism(s)- art, music, and literature. What about what they were doing was consistently expressed by all of them? The common thread. This AW thread “Latin”, (Onewriter, et al.) may have helped me in to find an answer to that question, as well as to some derivative questions and answers. ie. Tennyson, Kipling … goes to Leighton, Waterhouse, Alma Tadema. They spoke the King’s English. Yes. The language card seemed too weak a supposition. Yet, I was close, but just not satisfied. English is not all that good at structuring thought when trying to render it artistically. Spanish is a lot better- at least for me. Sexier colors. Everyone, artists, had to do a thing-sojourn in Italy to learn their colors, ie. Reubens. The right vector- English, Spanish, German, language and communication, but it seems the wrong, wronger Language.

Then someone way up on this Thread list did the “LATIN” thing. WOW. Who would of thought…

The way Latin is structured… most of those very late romantic “minds” probably went to Eaton- or equal, later Cambridge, etc. Their entire curriculum was in Latin. Idle conversations had to be in Latin. They ordered lunch in the cafeteria in Latin. Diplomas were written in Latin. They had to think in Latin… not English. They had to use Latin structure to communicate. .. and may have influenced how “To do art, music, literature”. Sounds like a graduate thesis coming on. I now have to re-read my Thomas Hardy books all over again.

Maybe not. Well, I will anyway... good story telling reviewed.

Amazing. Amazing. Latin structure and its relevance to …

Thanks to all who have gone before at AW.

I am really rocking on that horse.

WOW!

rockinhorseman
02-19-2011, 08:02 PM
[QUOTE=OneWriter;5249982]I just thought of another Latin word we often use in Italian: lapsus. I am a lapsus queen.
----


Lapis lazuli sometimes abbreviated to lapis is a relatively rare semi-precious stone that has been prized since antiquity for its intense blue color. ...

hence... Latin used in Art. Hmm

OneWriter
02-19-2011, 08:05 PM
They ordered lunch in the cafeteria in Latin.


Not quite. They'd order prandium et vinum at the taberna. :D

rockinhorseman
02-19-2011, 08:13 PM
Not quite. They'd order prandium et vinum at the taberna. :D
---
Tears in my eyes (oracles)... laughing so hard. Need air!!!!

rockinhorseman
02-19-2011, 08:27 PM
Not quite. They'd order prandium et vinum at the taberna. :D

----

To the baths with the venum we will go! LOL

Medievalist
02-19-2011, 09:37 PM
The way Latin is structured… most of those very late romantic “minds” probably went to Eaton- or equal, later Cambridge, etc. Their entire curriculum was in Latin. Idle conversations had to be in Latin. They ordered lunch in the cafeteria in Latin.

Woah . . . slow down. You're covering about 400 years of language and poetry here.

By the time of the eighteenth century, Latin was still taught, but not as a language of daily use; schoolboys at Eaton did not use it outside of the classroom. Dons at Cambridge and Oxford, yes--and they still do.

Not so much by the time of the Romantics--and that would only have been mostly men.

Of the romantic poets that are well known, Keats had the most Latin, (Medical texts were often still in Latin) competing with Byron and Shelley. Wordsworth, not so much--and for the lushness of much of his language, look to the diaries of his sister Dorothy, which Wordsworth "borrowed" from heavily.

Byron was quite capable of writing quality poetry in, I think, four languages, and did, and genuinely was obscenely over educated.

I would suggest you look at not only the influence of Italian but closer at English itself--and the English landscape, and remember that there was a giant divide by the seventeenth century in terms of education of men and women.

rockinhorseman
02-20-2011, 01:31 AM
Structure. How the bi-cameral brain structures and sequences thoughts, feelings, and associated responses- may be a “thread” . We can be inspired. We can be provoked. We can hope, love, and be loved. Associated biochemical pathways in process… is part of the picture. How and why does the last pages in Mayor of Casterbridge evoke such tearful moments, enough of which can inspire an artist to paint a very saddened portrait of a fallen man, or another writer to write-a-writ of rebuttal- ending it happily.

Tennyson’s Idylls of the King, Malory’s Le Morte d'Arthur did inspire a whole flock of post pre-Raphaelite artists to render their sympathy and empathy in expressions of condolence to their plight of woes… so to speak.

Casa blanca. The house is first verbally constructed, then the color is applied. The house is first artistically drawn, then painted white. Sequencing? Latin? Neither am I a linguist, obviously, nor a literary critique. Just a guy playing with discovery… inspired by an AW thread-thought: Latin. Hopefully, that is what threads can be about.

Rufus Coppertop
02-23-2011, 09:37 AM
Eheu! Fiamus tacitum hic, non ita est?

OneWriter
02-23-2011, 10:14 PM
Fortuna caeca est.

De fumo in flammam.

Ubi maior minor cessat.

.... :D ....

Rufus Coppertop
02-24-2011, 05:28 AM
Flamma exaequatrix magna maioris minorisque est. :evil:

OneWriter
02-24-2011, 05:40 AM
Flamma exaequatrix magna maioris minorisque est. :evil:

Ooh... nice! That's an awesome plot device, too!!!! :evil

Okay, let's see...

:idea:

Veni, vidi, vici!!! :D

OneWriter
02-24-2011, 05:44 AM
Oh, just thought of another one:

Amor vincit omnia. :heart: :kiss: :heart:

Rufus Coppertop
02-24-2011, 08:04 AM
Oh, just thought of another one:

Amor vincit omnia. :heart: :kiss: :heart:

Cum amplexibus pro omnibus conviviaque laetitiosa.:Hug2::Sun::e2dance::e2drunk:

DamaNegra
02-24-2011, 08:44 AM
Uh... I barely started learning latin about a month ago...

The best I can do is Ubi sunt?

Rufus Coppertop
02-24-2011, 09:00 AM
Salve! Hic sunt. - Greetings! We are here.

Debemus convivium habere. We should have a party. Or more literally, Debemus = we ought which takes the infinitive habere as its object which in turn takes convivium (accusative neuter) as its object.

By the way, after a month you've just gotta know that Latin is FUN! It's a lot of work obviously, but it's seriously good fun.

Have you met the third declension yet? It can be a bit of a bastard.

DamaNegra
02-24-2011, 10:27 AM
I was just introduced to it yesterday... my head is still reeling O.o might explain why I haven't been functioning properly...

Rufus Coppertop
02-24-2011, 07:57 PM
Never mind, the pluperfect passive subjunctive will make everything better. :evil:

DamaNegra
02-25-2011, 09:31 AM
The plus buh buh wha?!?! :Wha:

Rufus Coppertop
02-27-2011, 06:33 AM
It's an evil Latin grammar monster with Cicero Rocks tattooed between its horns. It likes to devour beginning Latin students and descendents of Mark Antony.

Shhhh! I think it's getting closer. :chair

OneWriter
02-27-2011, 09:47 AM
Ah, the plus perfect... because you see, the perfect alone just wasn't enough.
Melius abundare quam deficiere! ;)

Rufus Coppertop
02-27-2011, 03:13 PM
Amplius maior est, nisi id est alicuius quid vere sugit.

:evil:

DamaNegra
02-28-2011, 07:00 AM
:scared:

Rufus Coppertop
03-19-2011, 08:17 PM
:chair Ieritne adhuc?

DamaNegra
03-19-2011, 09:14 PM
No, I'm still struggling with the third declension haha

Tepelus
03-19-2011, 09:15 PM
Okay all you Latin smarties, how would you translate "You will be mine". A female vampire whispers this into my MC's (male) ear, if that helps.

Rufus Coppertop
03-19-2011, 09:33 PM
Okay all you Latin smarties, how would you translate "You will be mine". A female vampire whispers this into my MC's (male) ear, if that helps.

Eris mihi!

Rufus Coppertop
03-19-2011, 09:35 PM
No, I'm still struggling with the third declension haha

It's the hardest of the lot. There are sets of nominative endings that generally tell you the gender but as always, there are exceptions. One lecturer I had recommended that we just make sure we memorize the gender along with the noun.

If you pair the nouns up with pronouns according to gender, that could help.

Tepelus
03-19-2011, 09:48 PM
Thanks Rufus! :)

DamaNegra
03-19-2011, 09:55 PM
It's the hardest of the lot. There are sets of nominative endings that generally tell you the gender but as always, there are exceptions. One lecturer I had recommended that we just make sure we memorize the gender along with the noun.

If you pair the nouns up with pronouns according to gender, that could help.

Funnily, my biggest problem is with number rather than gender. I always mix up singular and plural!

Maybe because gender is kind of intuitive if you know Spanish?

SaraP
03-19-2011, 10:05 PM
I would think so, DamaNegra. All the english-speakers I've met that are learning portuguese struggle with gender.

DamaNegra
03-19-2011, 10:22 PM
I would think so, DamaNegra. All the english-speakers I've met that are learning portuguese struggle with gender.

Yes, that's always one of the sore spots with Spanish as well. Plusquamperfect in Spanish is also a headache for non-natives :D

Rufus Coppertop
03-20-2011, 12:34 AM
Yes, that's always one of the sore spots with Spanish as well. Plusquamperfect in Spanish is also a headache for non-natives :D

Is that the same as the pluperfect in Latin?

DamaNegra
03-20-2011, 12:37 AM
Well, it must be derived. What's the pluperfect in Latin?

Rufus Coppertop
03-20-2011, 12:49 AM
Thanks Rufus! :)

No worries. I thought of another one too.

Eris meus.

Eris=you will be
meus = masculine possessive pronoun. It's a bloke she's saying it to so eris meus works.

Personally, I prefer eris mihi but that's just me.

Tepelus
03-20-2011, 12:56 AM
I'll use the one you prefer.

DamaNegra
03-20-2011, 01:26 AM
Yes, listen to him :D Rufus doctus est (<-- and that, ladies and gentlemen, is the whole extent of my latin knowledge).

Rufus Coppertop
03-20-2011, 01:31 AM
You two are sweet.

:e2grouphu

Rufus Coppertop
03-20-2011, 01:37 AM
Well, it must be derived. What's the pluperfect in Latin?

Perfect tense - We sat in the senate house.

Pluperfect - We had been sitting in the senate house.

Pluperfect followed by perfect - We had been sitting in the senate house for a while when Cato the Censor started raving on about Carthage needing to be destroyed.

DamaNegra
03-20-2011, 01:41 AM
Yes, it's pretty much the same in Spanish, then. The past tenses are the most difficult to learn, since we actually have two different ways of expressing past action-- perfect and "copretérito" which I'm not sure can even be translated to English.

SaraP
03-20-2011, 01:53 AM
Just to see if it's the same in Portuguese, can you give examples?

DamaNegra
03-20-2011, 02:17 AM
Just to see if it's the same in Portuguese, can you give examples?

I second the motion! I want to see Latin plusquamperfect at work! :D

SaraP
03-20-2011, 02:40 AM
Erm... actually I meant you, in Spanish, the two different past tenses. ;) :D

DamaNegra
03-20-2011, 02:44 AM
Erm... actually I meant you, in Spanish, the two different past tenses. ;) :D

Ooops. :D

Well, here goes:

Pretérito: Fui al cine y me encontré a Juan.

Copretérito: Iba al cine y me encontré a Juan.

Both of those sentences have a very different meaning. The first means that I met Juan at the movie, and the second that I met him on my way to the movies. It's very subtle.

Rufus Coppertop
03-20-2011, 08:31 AM
Copreterito?

Is that about something happening at roughly the same time or STILL HAPPENING at the time you're speaking of?

Tepelus
03-20-2011, 05:15 PM
You two are sweet.

:e2grouphu


Awwww! :Hug2:

SaraP
03-20-2011, 06:30 PM
Ooops. :D

Well, here goes:

Pretérito: Fui al cine y me encontré a Juan.

Copretérito: Iba al cine y me encontré a Juan.

Both of those sentences have a very different meaning. The first means that I met Juan at the movie, and the second that I met him on my way to the movies. It's very subtle.

Yeah, it's similar here:

Fui ao cinema e encontrei o João.

Ia ao cinema e encontrei o João.

Actually, we could also do:

Estava a ir para o cinema quando encontrei o João. (I was going to the theater when I found John.)

Tinha ido ao cinema quando encontrei o João. (I had been to the theater when I found John.)

I suppose it would help some to the discussion if I knew anything about grammar, which I don't. At all (I basically never learned it). :(

Rufus Coppertop
03-20-2011, 07:36 PM
Lawks! :scared:

Quando means "when"?

Fui means "I was"?

SaraP
03-20-2011, 09:16 PM
Quando means when, yes.

Fui can be both I went and I was:

Fui ao médico. = I went to the doctor.

Fui um médico. = I was a doctor.

DamaNegra
03-21-2011, 04:04 AM
Copreterito?

Is that about something happening at roughly the same time or STILL HAPPENING at the time you're speaking of?

No, it is about an action that happened in the past during a certain amount of time. The key thing about copreterito is the duration. It's kind of hard to explain. Is there nothing like it in Latin?

Rufus Coppertop
03-21-2011, 06:40 AM
No, it is about an action that happened in the past during a certain amount of time. The key thing about copreterito is the duration. It's kind of hard to explain. Is there nothing like it in Latin?

Unless it's equivalent to Latin's Imperfect Tense, which has the sense of a thing still happening in the past at the time being spoken of, I can't think of an equivalent.

Latin (in the Indicative Mood) has present, future, imperfect, perfect, future-perfect & pluperfect.

And Sarah, that's interesting the way the verb itself changes like that.

DamaNegra
03-21-2011, 06:55 AM
Unless it's equivalent to Latin's Imperfect Tense, which has the sense of a thing still happening in the past at the time being spoken of, I can't think of an equivalent.

Latin (in the Indicative Mood) has present, future, imperfect, perfect, future-perfect & pluperfect.

Yep, I think it's the same thing. Whew! One less thing to worry about, Latin and Spanish have the same verbal conjugations :) Now I only have to worry about the declensions.

Rufus Coppertop
03-21-2011, 07:52 AM
Yep, I think it's the same thing. Whew! One less thing to worry about, Latin and Spanish have the same verbal conjugations :) Now I only have to worry about the declensions.

Have you met hic, haec, hoc yet? Or ille, illa, illud?

DamaNegra
03-21-2011, 08:14 AM
Have you met hic, haec, hoc yet? Or ille, illa, illud?

No, should I start trembling?

SaraP
03-21-2011, 08:18 AM
Have you met hic, haec, hoc yet?

This always makes me think of someone being drunk. :roll:

Rufus Coppertop
03-21-2011, 09:08 AM
No, should I start trembling?

Gosh no!

Celebrate the fact that you have something to look forward to. Pronouns!

hic, haec, hoc, as well being something an experimentally inclined drunkard might come out with (Gratias tibi do, Sarah!) ... are a convenient way to help with gender in the third declension.

Three ways of saying "this" in the nominative case.

hic = masc
haec=fem
hoc=neuter

So instead of memorizing "tempus. temporis = time" and then a month later, wondering if it's neuter or feminine, memorize it as "hoc tempus".

Then you'll know that tempus is a neuter noun because hoc is the neuter nominative form of the agreeing pronoun.

hoc tempus, hoc flumen, haec muliere, hic vir, = this time, this river, this woman, this man

Or use adjectives if you like. It doesn't have to be pronouns. The thing to do is play with it when you're learning it. Play and enjoy.

DamaNegra
03-22-2011, 05:23 AM
So as a bit of "light" reading where I can acquire vocabulary and learn latin, what do you recommend? (preferrably something I can get at gutenberg.org)

Rufus Coppertop
03-22-2011, 07:43 AM
So as a bit of "light" reading where I can acquire vocabulary and learn latin, what do you recommend? (preferrably something I can get at gutenberg.org)

Are you studying by yourself or are you at school or uni? What textbooks are you using?