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LuckyH
03-04-2010, 11:54 AM
I canít remember how old I was, but from the geography of my memory I must have been under eight, when my grandmother caught me reading a book in a meadow, rather than pick mushrooms. She thrashed me with a fallen branch which broke, and Iíve never forgiven her.

I still remember the pinched look on the librarianís face when I booked out the three books, the maximum allowed, from a small local library. She scoffed, ďYou just pretend to read those books.Ē

Only a couple of weeks ago, my partner found me reading at the back of the dark garage. She shouted, ďI thought you were supposed to be cleaning up the dog shit.Ē

This morning I discovered that Iím not the only one:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2010/mar/03/a-week-without-books

Charlee
03-04-2010, 03:11 PM
Wow I'm not alone!!!

I have an extra large handbag for carrying my books because I'm always worried I'll finish a book and not have another one handy. I read while washing up I pop the book between the wall and taps and keep a towel next to the sink to dry my hands, for turning the page. I thought I was strange.
I guess not!

hannah_92
03-04-2010, 03:34 PM
I'm not alone either! Ever since I was old enough to read I've had books. There isn't a day goes by that I don't read. I read while I eat my breakfast and when I'm watching TV. I have a hard job taking myself away from by book to actually do some work. :D

shaldna
03-04-2010, 03:37 PM
i read obsessivley.

My daughter can read and she's three. she can read around 800 words and is starting to write.

I have to admit that I have been spending alot of time teaching her this last year, but I wholeheartedly encourage kids to read.

knight_tour
03-04-2010, 04:59 PM
I have so many books on my shelves I just know I will never get through them all, especially since I keep adding more, and that makes me sad. I am proud, though, that my sons not only love reading, but have even started to write stories after observing me do so much writing. I love being a positive influence!

Alpha Echo
03-04-2010, 05:07 PM
Sounds like me too! My mother encouraged me to read as much as possible. But the elementary school Librarian thought I couldn't possibly be reading the books I took out (all above my grade reading level), nor I could be reading them so fast.

My fiance is now used to seeing me with a book in my hands all the time. He doesn't really mind, though. He's even building be beautiful bookshelves!

Alpha Echo
03-04-2010, 05:08 PM
I have so many books on my shelves I just know I will never get through them all, especially since I keep adding more, and that makes me sad. I am proud, though, that my sons not only love reading, but have even started to write stories after observing me do so much writing. I love being a positive influence!


I'm with you. I hate to give away my books and just keep adding more! Though I am swapping some now. I'm hoping I'm a positive influence on the Little One...so far, she's enjoying books (though she's only 5 - but she can read, and I'm so proud!)

shub_niggurath
03-04-2010, 05:48 PM
theres something creepy about this thread

Calla Lily
03-04-2010, 06:12 PM
When a pre-teen I once got 3 PBs in the mail on a Saturday. The only reason I didn't finish all 3 that day is because my mother ripped the third from my hands that afternoon and threw me outside to get fresh air. (I finished the book under the covers with a flashlight that night.)

Nothing's really changed. :D

CaroGirl
03-04-2010, 06:12 PM
Me too. And now my 12 yo son. I've almost had to take books away from him in punishment to get him to do chores or go to sleep before 10 at night. Almost. I've threatened but haven't done it yet.

lucidzfl
03-04-2010, 06:34 PM
Unfortunately... I am not addicted to reading. I actually have to force myself to do it. Its not that I don't like it. Its that theres ALWAYS something i'd rather be doing.

But reading is an integral part of growing as a writer, so I make time for it.

folkchick
03-04-2010, 06:50 PM
From my WIP: "I don't do drugs and alcohol . . . I do books."

I grew up in a library and knew every book on those shelves, even the dirty ones, hehe. And then I worked at a library forever, always leaving with a huge stack in my arms.

Jamesaritchie
03-04-2010, 07:34 PM
I learned to read very early, thanks to an aunt who thought reading was the most important thing any child could learn. I still remember sort of learning all at once. None of the words on the page made sense, and then, in what seemed like an instant, all those weird letters just turned into words that I could read. I couldn't read much of anything one minute, and the next I could read almost anything my aunt showed me.

It was the oddest thing. One minute not a word made sense, and the next, everything did. It actually frightened my aunt a bit.

But I've talked to several other readers who had this happen, so it can't be too uncommon. Isaac Asimov described it by saying the letters turned into ants, crawled all over the page, and when they stopped crawling, they had formed words that he could read.

They didn't crawl for me, they just sort of transformed, but it did happen almost instantly.

I still love reading, and if I had to give up writing or reading, writing would stop at once.

CaroGirl
03-04-2010, 07:44 PM
I learned to read very early, thanks to an aunt who thought reading was the most important thing any child could learn. I still remember sort of learning all at once. None of the words on the page made sense, and then, in what seemed like an instant, all those weird letters just turned into words that I could read. I couldn't read much of anything one minute, and the next I could read almost anything my aunt showed me.

It was the oddest thing. One minute not a word made sense, and the next, everything did. It actually frightened my aunt a bit.

But I've talked to several other readers who had this happen, so it can't be too uncommon. Isaac Asimov described it by saying the letters turned into ants, crawled all over the page, and when they stopped crawling, they had formed words that he could read.

They didn't crawl for me, they just sort of transformed, but it did happen almost instantly.

I still love reading, and if I had to give up writing or reading, writing would stop at once.
I learned to read so early I have no memory of not knowing how. It would be interesting to remember that moment, though.

lucidzfl
03-04-2010, 07:47 PM
From my WIP: "I don't do drugs and alcohol . . . I do books."

I like to think there's time for all three!

knight_tour
03-04-2010, 07:49 PM
I still remember sort of learning all at once. None of the words on the page made sense, and then, in what seemed like an instant, all those weird letters just turned into words that I could read. I couldn't read much of anything one minute, and the next I could read almost anything my aunt showed me.

It was the oddest thing. One minute not a word made sense, and the next, everything did. It actually frightened my aunt a bit.


This is just what happened to me! I was four and it happened with a book called something like 'Biddy and the Ducks'. One minute I was just listening to my mom read and the next I realized that I could actually read the words on the pages. I just started reading on my own after that.

Shadow_Ferret
03-04-2010, 07:53 PM
I was once addicted to reading. I spent my entire time in high school reading rather than learning.

I still enjoy it, a lot, but I have a family--wife, kids, dogs--and they all demand my attention and I find reading the same paragraph over and over again just isn't very satisfying. :D

Jamesaritchie
03-04-2010, 08:17 PM
I was once addicted to reading. I spent my entire time in high school reading rather than learning.

I still enjoy it, a lot, but I have a family--wife, kids, dogs--and they all demand my attention and I find reading the same paragraph over and over again just isn't very satisfying. :D


Huh, and here I thought reading was learning! I have a family, too. A wife, kids, grandkids, pets, etc., but there always time for reading, just as there's always time for writing.

Shadow_Ferret
03-04-2010, 08:19 PM
I didn't say I didn't read. I have to pick my moments. When they're busy on the X-Box, I can read (but then the dogs want out). Mostly I read and write after everyone has gone to bed.

And reading Edgar Rice Burroughs or Fritz Leiber may be learning, but it's not getting you a passing grade in physics. :)

Jamesaritchie
03-04-2010, 08:36 PM
I learned to read so early I have no memory of not knowing how. It would be interesting to remember that moment, though.


Ray Bradbury claims he remembers being born. My memories don't go back quite that far, but for good or ill, I still remember learning how to walk when I was still a couple of months short of my first birthday. I have several strong memories of things that happened long before I turned one, and hundreds of vivid memories from the next two years.

Shakesbear
03-04-2010, 09:21 PM
I always cook food that only needs a fork or spoon to eat it - the other hand is used for turning pages. I have lost count of how many books I have - but need to give some away as I have almost run out of room for new ones.

I was told by a teacher that if you do not remember learning to read it was easy for you to learn. I have no recollection of learning only of the pleasure of reading.

Does anyone keep a record of the books they have read?

CaroGirl
03-04-2010, 09:33 PM
Ray Bradbury claims he remembers being born. My memories don't go back quite that far, but for good or ill, I still remember learning how to walk when I was still a couple of months short of my first birthday. I have several strong memories of things that happened long before I turned one, and hundreds of vivid memories from the next two years.
It's weird. I have memories from the crib and remember being toilet trained (which was completed before I was 18 mos). But I don't remember not being able to read. I learned when I was just shy of three years old.

I do remember my first day of nursery school when the teacher asked who could read and I raised my hand. She must not have believed me because she had me read to her out of a book I hadn't seen before. The surprise on her face told me not too many other kids my age could read. I just recall being offended she didn't believe me.

MumblingSage
03-04-2010, 10:07 PM
I found out I wasn't alone when I read the church bulletin and one of the parish school kids wrote that he would "give up reading when I'm not supposed to" during Lent. Apparantly some of my grade school teachers told my mom they felt a little worried, since I was reading when I should be doing work, but if they told me not to they feared I would stop reading alltogether...

And now I still read when I should be working. That or I lurk on AW.

Collectonian
03-04-2010, 10:10 PM
I can't remember a time not reading. I used to hit our public library every week, checking out the maximum books (3 for us too). I vaguely remember when I hit 13 and had no limit, and immediately checked out 30 books (that my poor dad had to carry home LOL).

I logged every book I read in 2008, and I read well over 400. Should be fun when see this year's logs. :D

Jamesaritchie
03-04-2010, 10:54 PM
It's weird. I have memories from the crib and remember being toilet trained (which was completed before I was 18 mos). But I don't remember not being able to read. I learned when I was just shy of three years old.

I do remember my first day of nursery school when the teacher asked who could read and I raised my hand. She must not have believed me because she had me read to her out of a book I hadn't seen before. The surprise on her face told me not too many other kids my age could read. I just recall being offended she didn't believe me.


I remember the same thing happening several times. It was always annoying. I thought all kids could read. Then I started school, and learned on the first day that most kids couldn't read anything, and couldn't write. My aunt also taught me to write cursive before I learned to print, and that, too, made me a weird first grader. I had to prove both things to the teacher, of course.

Being able to read well and write cursive did allow me to skip the first couple of grades of school. Unfortunately, I wasn't quite as good with math, and my school started teaching the "advanced" kids algegra in the fourth grade, so I couldn't jump all the way to my reading level.

LuckyH
03-04-2010, 11:00 PM
Another thing that interested me when I read the article this morning, was the authorís mention that severe tension in a book she was reading made her feel tense too, Daft as it sounds, and not something I readily like to admit to; the same thing happens to me, sometimes.

I regard it as an authorís ability to grab the reader, but it doesnít happen with every book I read, and Iím struggling to think of a ready example. This is a tame one, but when the main character in Misery got hobbled, Stephen King made me feel his pain and helplessness.

Albannach
03-04-2010, 11:00 PM
I learned to read so early I have no memory of not knowing how. It would be interesting to remember that moment, though.
I also can not remember NOT being able to read.

Satori1977
03-04-2010, 11:12 PM
So glad I am not the only one...though after spending so much time on these boards, I doubted it. I have always been a huge reader. I don't really recall learning to read, but I know when I learned, I never stopped. And I would rarely let my parents read to me when I was little, I always wanted to read to them. In elementary school we had seperate reading groups, and I would be in the highest one. I used to read a book a day (two if they were short) and I don't have the time to do that anymore. Not with my kids especially, and two crazy dogs. And of course, my hubby :-). But I read every day without fail. Usually I am reading several books at a time. I keep one by the bed, one downstairs for when I am doing laundry, cooking or eating, and one in the bathroom (and I find myself staying in there much longer than I have to because I don't want to put the book down, lol). I bring one in my car when I go pick up my oldest from school, and usually I will leave early so I have a few minutes of peace to read. I don't know what it is, but there is something about books that just calm and relax me. If I am in a bad mood or stressed, I had over the kids to their dad and take off for a bookstore or library. Just being around all those books puts me in a better mood. If I never became a published writer, my dream job would either be a librarian or to own a little bookstore. Nothing against my wonderful family, but I am happiest when surrounded by books.

timewaster
03-05-2010, 12:06 AM
[QUOTE=LuckyH;4702467]I canít remember how old I was, but from the geography of my memory I must have been under eight, when my grandmother caught me reading a book in a meadow, rather than pick mushrooms. She thrashed me with a fallen branch which broke, and Iíve never forgiven her.



This morning I discovered that Iím not the only one:

Me too - an old blog post on just that subject:

http://awfullybigblogadventure.blogspot.com/2009/11/playing-devilss-advocate.html

aadams73
03-05-2010, 12:24 AM
I began reading on my own when I was three. I haven't stopped since. If I'm eating and there's nothing to read, I'll read the condiment bottles.

lucidzfl
03-05-2010, 12:38 AM
I began reading on my own when I was three. I haven't stopped since. If I'm eating and there's nothing to read, I'll read the condiment bottles.

I always watch TV while I eat. Unless I'm at work. Then I post on AW.

aadams73
03-05-2010, 12:44 AM
I don't watch TV.

friendlyhobo
03-05-2010, 01:02 AM
Most of my childhood consisted of going to the library with my mom, who reads like nobody's business. She still checks out like, 15 books every week. So she never got mad at me when I kept getting in trouble for having a book open in my lap in math class (which my best friend did to such a degree he was banned from his school library).

Oddly though, my dad hates fiction. All fiction. He didn't discourage me from reading, I just don't understand how my parents ever got along (oh wait...), and our fiction vs. non fiction debate happens biannually. If I hear anyone say "truth is stranger than fiction" I have like nine well rehearsed arguments to refute it.

Charlee
03-05-2010, 02:53 PM
Another thing that interested me when I read the article this morning, was the authorís mention that severe tension in a book she was reading made her feel tense too, Daft as it sounds, and not something I readily like to admit to; the same thing happens to me, sometimes.

I regard it as an authorís ability to grab the reader, but it doesnít happen with every book I read, and Iím struggling to think of a ready example. This is a tame one, but when the main character in Misery got hobbled, Stephen King made me feel his pain and helplessness.

I get this. I love Jodi Picoult butI get so emotionally involved with her books that I can't let the feelings go. I read on the way to work and get in all stressed out because of the feelings her characters are going through. It's a bit strange when you think about it.....

My boyfriend brought me some books at christmas but told me I wasn't allowed to read the depressing ones until after new year lol

hannah_92
03-05-2010, 04:21 PM
Another thing that interested me when I read the article this morning, was the authorís mention that severe tension in a book she was reading made her feel tense too, Daft as it sounds, and not something I readily like to admit to; the same thing happens to me, sometimes.

I regard it as an authorís ability to grab the reader, but it doesnít happen with every book I read, and Iím struggling to think of a ready example. This is a tame one, but when the main character in Misery got hobbled, Stephen King made me feel his pain and helplessness.

Yes, I agree with you totally. Sometimes I'll pick up a book and the first sentece draws me in. From then on I'll laugh when ti's funny, cry when it's sad and feel tension and anticipation at those moments throughout the book.

Lady Ice
03-05-2010, 10:38 PM
I love reading and hate giving away books, because you can bet that the one you give away is the one you're now craving to read...

LuckyH
03-05-2010, 11:23 PM
I love reading and hate giving away books, because you can bet that the one you give away is the one you're now craving to read...

I've given away books to an animal charity, and bought them back again.

lucidzfl
03-06-2010, 12:36 AM
I don't watch TV.

TV Shows and cooking are about the only way me and my wife spend time together on weeknights.

Carlene
03-06-2010, 12:58 AM
Oh me too! I was the weird kid with the thick glasses sitting in the corner reading, always reading. I can vividly remember walking into the library one day and saying to myself that I was going to start reading books in the A section and keep going until I'd read to the end of the alphabet! Of course I didn't realize people were writing new books and adding to the collection all the time.

I am especially blessed to be married to a reader. We have thousands of books all over the house and wouldn't dream of going to sleep at night without reading a few chapters.

Carlene

www.carlenedater.com
www.themysterystartshere.com
www.manicreaders.com/CarleneRaeDater

Jamesaritchie
03-06-2010, 01:12 AM
Oh me too! I was the weird kid with the thick glasses sitting in the corner reading, always reading. I can vividly remember walking into the library one day and saying to myself that I was going to start reading books in the A section and keep going until I'd read to the end of the alphabet! Of course I didn't realize people were writing new books and adding to the collection all the time.

I am especially blessed to be married to a reader. We have thousands of books all over the house and wouldn't dream of going to sleep at night without reading a few chapters.

Carlene

www.carlenedater.com (http://www.carlenedater.com)
www.themysterystartshere.com (http://www.themysterystartshere.com)
www.manicreaders.com/CarleneRaeDater (http://www.manicreaders.com/CarleneRaeDater)


As a kid, I read the entire SF section of our library this way. One of the saddest days of my life was when I read the last book in that section. New SF books came in, but not as fast as I was reading them.

Saltier
03-06-2010, 01:23 AM
As a kid, I read the entire SF section of our library this way. One of the saddest days of my life was when I read the last book in that section. New SF books came in, but not as fast as I was reading them.

Yeah. I remember other kids looking at me strange for knowing what the checkout limit per visit was.

aadams73
03-06-2010, 02:07 AM
TV Shows and cooking are about the only way me and my wife spend time together on weeknights.

Ah, see, now I don't have a wife.

knight_tour
03-06-2010, 02:21 AM
I was really into history as a kid. I remember reaching the end of the history section at the school library, so I turned around and started reading them all again.

AlishaS
03-06-2010, 02:51 AM
I read a lot, I even go through withdrawls. If I finish a book I have to go out asap to get a new one to read. I have stayed up till all hours of the night so I can finish books, take a book with me almost everywhere just inc ase there is a few minutes where I can get a few pages in. It' a problem lol cause I also buy all my books new which sure adds up.

LuckyH
03-06-2010, 12:08 PM
I was on holiday in southern France once, in a caravan on a nudist beach (by mistake), and started reading a fictional book on dyslexia when night fell. Despite a howling sandstorm outside I read all night long, finishing at the break of dawn with tears in my eyes.

The storm subsided and I slept on the beach during the day, oblivious to some incredibly ugly people walking around without a stitch on.