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Captain Scarf
09-03-2009, 07:57 AM
Apart from the obvious things like taking history courses and so on, you know you're an historian when:

1) Your choice of book for light reading is The Oxford History of the British Army

ishtar'sgate
09-03-2009, 09:04 AM
Mine is Everyday Life in Ancient Babylonia.:D

firedrake
09-03-2009, 09:07 AM
Workers, Society, and the Soviet State, Labor and Life in Moscow 1918-1929

I hasten to add it's not as dull as it sounds.

cooeedownunder
09-03-2009, 09:11 AM
Too funny - :ROFL:

PastMidnight
09-03-2009, 09:19 AM
-- your husband finds you hours later in the secondhand book shop, somewhat startled, sneezing over a stack of dusty books in the military history section, while the other women in the shop stare at you over armfuls of chick lit.

MaryMumsy
09-03-2009, 09:23 AM
When your favorite bookstore is the used one specializing in the Southwest US and Civil War, and you are the only woman in the store.

MM

firedrake
09-03-2009, 09:27 AM
...when you bore your colleagues into stupefied comas talking about the merits of the P-51 and the Spitfire.

PastMidnight
09-03-2009, 09:41 AM
-- friends and family quickly change the subject when "1893" is mentioned and your eyes light up eagerly.

TinneyH
09-03-2009, 06:09 PM
. . . you end your lengthy diatribe about how Corso Donati's unauthorized charge with the Pistoian troops was obviously the thing that turned the course of the battle of Campaldino by observing, "Everybody knows that!" and look up to find several faces staring at you with pitying, bewildered expressions...

DeleyanLee
09-03-2009, 06:34 PM
...you can name all the pharoahs of any dynasty in ancient Egypt, but cannot remember who's running your own country, state or city right now.

Suse
09-03-2009, 07:20 PM
... your idea of an evening's entertainment is Mycenaean Fortifications, Highways, Dams and Canals, a bucket of popcorn, and a giant bag of M&M's.

Zelenka
09-03-2009, 07:47 PM
...People at work no longer ask rhetorical questions such as 'Why is London the British capital?' over lunch if you're at the table.

BardSkye
09-03-2009, 09:33 PM
...when your kids want to picnic at the beach and you want to eat lunch while reading the inscriptions on the tombstones at the old cemetary.

Shakesbear
09-03-2009, 10:22 PM
... you are made an admin on a web site because you know who ruled after Edward II ...

Doogs
09-04-2009, 12:29 AM
...spend what precious free time you have researching/writing a book set in the 6th century Roman/Byzantine Empire?

...use a handy reference to the fire brigades of Marcus Crassus to illustrate the dangers of surrendering life-saving services to profit motives?

RichardB
09-04-2009, 06:28 PM
... explain to a colleague that "disruptive technology" is the sort of thing that happened in 1905 when HMS Dreadnought obsoleted all the world's navies, promting the Germans to scrap their fleet and begin laying down all-big-gun battleships. Become so excited telling this story that you forget the colleague is from your company's research lab in Munich.

I did exactly this yesterday.

PastMidnight
09-04-2009, 07:09 PM
... explain to a colleague that "disruptive technology" is the sort of thing that happened in 1905 when HMS Dreadnought obsoleted all the world's navies, promting the Germans to scrap their fleet and begin laying down all-big-gun battleships. Become so excited telling this story that you forget the colleague is from your company's research lab in Munich.

I did exactly this yesterday.

Oh, my....

firedrake
09-04-2009, 07:12 PM
... explain to a colleague that "disruptive technology" is the sort of thing that happened in 1905 when HMS Dreadnought obsoleted all the world's navies, promting the Germans to scrap their fleet and begin laying down all-big-gun battleships. Become so excited telling this story that you forget the colleague is from your company's research lab in Munich.

I did exactly this yesterday.

I very nearly spewed coffee all over the lap top just now..

Suse
09-04-2009, 07:25 PM
… crusty old historians in tweed suits with leather patches on the elbows transform into rock gods before your eyes, and you’re thinking, ‘Bet he could teach me a thing or two about—about—Bronze Age sealstones/The Thermidorian Reaction/Polish reunification attempts of the thirteenth century.’ * ahhh sigh *

I don’t mean to lower the tone, but there’s a geriatric professor at the Open University and whenever he comes on the telly I am rapt and my tea gets cold.

MissAimee
09-04-2009, 08:03 PM
...you start celebrating King George IV of England's birthday as a annual event, and forgetting your own birthday that just passed..

Ariella
09-05-2009, 01:56 AM
...you learn a dead language to get at the information you need.

PastMidnight
09-05-2009, 04:31 AM
...houseguests discover that your bathroom reading material consists of the most recent issues of the Historical Novels Review.

dolores haze
09-05-2009, 04:44 AM
Explaining to a person you supervise that she needs to get along better with her co-workers, using the balkanization of Eastern Europe as an allegory, and ending with the punchline: "And you know what happened to Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand, right?"

Her: "He got fired?"

Me: "Um, no. He got shot."

dolores haze
09-06-2009, 11:45 PM
And little historians in the making:

My six year old: "How much longer are you going to be on the computer, Mommy?"

Me: "A little while. I'll be off by the time you're done watching Scooby Doo."

Him: "I don't wanna watch Scooby Doo! I want to watch re-enactments of the Battle of Gettysberg. Please hurry up, Mummy. I want to see Picket's Charge again."

Me: "sigh - not Picket's Charge...again."

History_Chick
09-07-2009, 12:03 AM
You read about Victorian sexual habits.

benbradley
09-07-2009, 01:34 AM
when you say "an historian."

I'm apparently not a historian.

Steam&Ink
09-07-2009, 07:38 AM
when you say "an historian."

I'm apparently not a historian.

Lol. I'm not an historian, but my mother would have kittens if she heard me saying "a historian".
Do you say "an hotel"? "An herb garden"?

I wouldn't worry about it - I think it's falling out of favour, really.

Captain Scarf
09-07-2009, 12:26 PM
Do you say "an hotel"? "An herb garden"?

Yes you would say 'an hotel' but probably not 'an herb garden'. The indefinite article 'an' is used in front of words beginning with a vowel sound (even if the word does not start with a vowel). 'Hotel' therefore starts with an 'oh' sound but in 'herb' the stress is in on the 'h'. (Except possibly in American English where 'herb' is pronounced 'erb'

Generally 'an' is used to avoid glottal stops, 'an historian' sounding better than 'a historian'

Steam&Ink
09-07-2009, 02:26 PM
Yes you would say 'an hotel' but probably not 'an herb garden'. The indefinite article 'an' is used in front of words beginning with a vowel sound (even if the word does not start with a vowel). 'Hotel' therefore starts with an 'oh' sound but in 'herb' the stress is in on the 'h'. (Except possibly in American English where 'herb' is pronounced 'erb'

Generally 'an' is used to avoid glottal stops, 'an historian' sounding better than 'a historian'


I agree it sounds better, and to be honest I think it's easier to say "an historian" than "a historian". I do say "an herb garden", and I speak (mostly) British English.

mayamolly
09-07-2009, 04:06 PM
... when you type the word "did" into your Google window, you get "did rihanna give chris brown herpes" (generic suggestion) and "did Achaemenian Persian women hunt" (personalized suggestion)

angeliz2k
09-07-2009, 10:56 PM
Yes you would say 'an hotel' but probably not 'an herb garden'. The indefinite article 'an' is used in front of words beginning with a vowel sound (even if the word does not start with a vowel). 'Hotel' therefore starts with an 'oh' sound but in 'herb' the stress is in on the 'h'. (Except possibly in American English where 'herb' is pronounced 'erb'

Generally 'an' is used to avoid glottal stops, 'an historian' sounding better than 'a historian'


Hotel doesn't start with an "oh" sound where I come from . . . "herb", though, stars with an "er" sound. So "a [uh] hotel" and "an herb garden".

I usually say "an historian" because even though I would pronounce the h, it would be very soft. "And historian" rolls off the tongue more easily.

MaryMumsy
09-08-2009, 01:27 AM
Interesting digression. I pronounce the H in hotel, herb, and historian. So they are all preceded by A not AN. Hour is a different matter.

MM

Carmy
09-08-2009, 02:20 AM
when history was your favourite subject at school, and the subject where you got the highest marks--always.

when your bookshelves are filled with more history books than works of fiction.

when finding out about the past is more exciting than reading about today's celebrities.

matdonna
09-09-2009, 09:03 AM
when you look up perfectly ordinary modern English words to make sure you're right about whether they derive from Old English or Old Norse.

Deb Kinnard
09-09-2009, 07:37 PM
...when your bedside TBR pile includes Bloodfeud, The Year 1000, and The Ties that Bound, atop the fiction selections with dust on them.

Deb, who's trying to teach herself basic greetings and phrases in Cornish for the WIP

DustyBooks
09-13-2009, 07:43 AM
When, in most libraries, you can find the naval history quicker than you can find the washroom.

Komnena
09-13-2009, 10:14 PM
When seeing a certain WWII destroyer is the high point of a trip.

SirOtter
09-14-2009, 11:21 AM
When you can name the US presidents in order forward or backward, but can't remember what day of the week it is.

When you counter irresponsible claims of freedom of speech, not by saying that such a liberty doesn't mean you can yell 'fire' in a crowded theater, but by specifically citing Oliver Wendell Holmes' majority decision in Schenck v. United States from 1919.

When you wonder why anyone would use a 1936 Cord for a taxi in The Shadow. Or why that 1940 Ford coupe was always passing in front of Lamont Cranston's house in the same movie. Or that you even know who Lamont Cranston was. Or what a 1936 Cord looks like.

When you get into vitriolic arguments over what year A Christmas Story is set.

When your wife has run out of things to throw at you for pointing out anachronisms in movies.

SirOtter
09-14-2009, 11:24 AM
When you figure out that all three of the presidents from your state were pricks.

donroc
09-14-2009, 08:57 PM
When you can counter foreigners' criticisms of you and your country with a detailed recital of their own nation's/tribe's faults -- with a genial smile of course.

Evaine
09-16-2009, 12:43 AM
When you talk about people from the 13thC as if you knew them personally - and get excited about the fact that Gerald of Wales visited your village!

DeleyanLee
09-16-2009, 01:00 AM
You're looking at possible mates on a dating site and get all excited to see someone standing next to a Model A or original Harley, but don't give a hoot about the late model Lexus or SUV.

DMarie84
09-17-2009, 04:53 AM
When you spend an entire afternoon watching History Detectives online and longing to be a history detective yourself...

When most of your dreams are historical based....

PastMidnight
09-17-2009, 06:02 PM
When you spend an entire afternoon watching History Detectives online and longing to be a history detective yourself...


I :heart: History Detectives!

shethinkstoomuch
09-21-2009, 08:29 PM
When you woke up very early so you can get across London for the Nelson-Napoleon exhibit in 2005. You had been researching this for nearly six months.

When you go to the library and check out a stack of books about WWII for fun, over summer vacation.

When your mom buys you Winston Churchill's six-volume history of WWII.

BAY
09-24-2009, 05:16 AM
From my family: Can't we go on vacation just once and not find the local history mystery?

Hip-Hop-a-potamus
12-04-2009, 09:03 PM
ALMOST all of the above, and

...when you would never even think of vacationing on some tropical island, as it would be a complete waste of a week, lying around doing nothing but sun and tropical umbrella drinks.

Especially when you could be at an archives somewhere researching, finding amazing stories on old newspaper microfilm, and thinking, "Holy crap! I could write a novel about that!"

Lyra Jean
12-04-2009, 09:13 PM
When your husband tells you "Become a teacher already so that you'll have a captive audience."

Hip-Hop-a-potamus
12-04-2009, 10:20 PM
When your husband tells you "Become a teacher already so that you'll have a captive audience."

:ROFL:

BradyH1861
12-05-2009, 08:19 AM
You read about Victorian sexual habits.

And then try them out....... (There is an excellent book called Sex in the Civil War: The Story the Soldiers Wouldn't Tell. Worth reading!)

When you spend your honeymoon visiting Civil War battlefields. (Luckily my wife is a history teacher, so she didn't mind!)

L.C. Blackwell
12-08-2009, 07:18 AM
Explaining to a person you supervise that she needs to get along better with her co-workers, using the balkanization of Eastern Europe as an allegory, and ending with the punchline: "And you know what happened to Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand, right?"

Her: "He got fired?"

Me: "Um, no. He got shot."


If I ever end up as a supervisor, I'm gonna plagiarize that.:roll:

You know you're a historian when your MC is a professor of electrical engineering, and the thrill of your week is finding actual MIT electrical engineering and physics class lectures videotaped during the year your WIP takes place ... and even though you don't understand one word in ten, you now know what people were wearing, the appearance of the auditorium, the technology used, the style of lecturing.... I overloaded my brain watching those videos. I'm gonna watch some more, some time. :crazy:

:popcorn:

BradyH1861
12-08-2009, 07:48 AM
When you see a girl in a mini skirt and wonder what she would look like in a hoop skirt.

(I plead guilty to that one.)

Lyra Jean
12-09-2009, 09:02 PM
When you see a girl in a mini skirt and wonder what she would look like in a hoop skirt.

(I plead guilty to that one.)

clothed lol :D

Puma
12-10-2009, 10:31 PM
I haven't contributed to this thread yet, and I ought to ...

You know you're a historian when you get excited finding a Revolutionary War veteran buried in a local cemetery that everyone else has missed.

You know you're a historican when you stand in the middle of a hundred acre field and try to figure out where the native Americans might have camped (or which way the original farmers plowed the field and scattered the artifacts.)

You know you're a historian when what you wish Santa would bring you for Christmas is a ground penetrating radar unit. (They have them, but the price!) Puma

Judg
12-11-2009, 12:18 AM
When you have to negotiate vacations with your spouse: "One historical site for me, one public garden for you, one historical site for me, one art museum for you, one historical site for me, one zoo for you..."

When you think taking her along on a history study tour in Italy constitutes a vacation...

Judg, who is married to a history professor who still mourns the fact he has not yet hauled me off to Gettysburg.

DeleyanLee
12-11-2009, 12:35 AM
You know you're a historian when you run into a set of names in the first paragraph of a book and automatically pin not only a date, but a specific location on where the story has to be set. (Happened to me last night with a book I was reading--I stopped when I realized it was NOT going to be about the family I thought it was. Mean ol' author, writing a contemporary instead of historical.)

CowgirlPoet
12-11-2009, 03:18 AM
These are all so good! :D

You know you're a historian when you follow 1940s rationing requirements for a month, just to know what people felt like back them.

You know you're a historian when the most exciting gift you receive is a free ticket to a lecture on early plastic surgery.

Albannach
12-20-2009, 06:48 AM
You know you were BORN a historian when not only is your favorite reading material medieval original sources, but you grew up reading them.

HistorySleuth
12-31-2009, 04:36 AM
I haven't contributed to this thread yet, and I ought to ...

You know you're a historian when you get excited finding a Revolutionary War veteran buried in a local cemetery that everyone else has missed.

You know you're a historican when you stand in the middle of a hundred acre field and try to figure out where the native Americans might have camped (or which way the original farmers plowed the field and scattered the artifacts.)

You know you're a historian when what you wish Santa would bring you for Christmas is a ground penetrating radar unit. (They have them, but the price!) Puma

I"M WITH YOU PUMA!

You know you're a historian when ... that's what you do for a living in my case. Lucky me! I do get to play history detective too. Have some silverware that I'm tracking on my desk right now as a matter of fact. Ummm..

You know you're an historian when ... another historical newspaper getting digitized and put on the internet for free is exciting -- and more addicting than facebook!

DustyBooks
12-31-2009, 07:20 AM
...when planning a camping trip leads you to at least Google the history of the RV.

...when, a couple of days after some epic cross-country skiing, you can sit with a friend in a Chinese buffet and talk about the history of bindings for over half an hour without getting up for more food.

...when helping a friend with a jigsaw puzzle, you muse aloud, "when did they invent these, anyway?"

Belle_91
01-25-2010, 02:34 AM
you helped teach your history class about King Henry VIII and his six wives and how his divorce from Katherine of Aragon was all a political matter.

gwendy85
01-25-2010, 12:50 PM
When you begin lecturing your classmates about the mistakes made by our forefathers, talk to them about World War II, volunteer for any report in history class involving World War II, and insist on showing a World War II documentary for a school event (and succeeding)

At least this was me, four years ago. Yeah, I can get pretty obsessive 0_0

HistorySleuth
01-25-2010, 06:44 PM
From my family: Can't we go on vacation just once and not find the local history mystery?

Sheesh! ...... NO! Of course not!

Deb Kinnard
01-29-2010, 03:35 AM
...when you Google an esoteric medieval English term and the only citation it comes up with is the book on top of your desk, that you just finished searching through for that very term...

Le sigh.

Swordswoman
01-29-2010, 06:23 AM
...when you make a research trip to France and discover that your vocabulary includes words for armour, pike, cannon, wheel-lock pistol and even 'the second most senior veteran in a company', but is not up to asking how you get internet access in your hotel room. :o

Louise

Hip-Hop-a-potamus
01-29-2010, 08:17 AM
...when you make a research trip to France and discover that your vocabulary includes words for armour, pike, cannon, wheel-lock pistol and even 'the second most senior veteran in a company', but is not up to asking how you get internet access in your hotel room. :o

Louise

:ROFL:

Hip-Hop-a-potamus
01-29-2010, 08:22 AM
When you nearly wet yourself as you stumble across this amazing specimen of medical goods of all types (http://home.att.net/~combatmedic/), but particularly this one:

http://home.att.net/~combatmedic/Jungle_kit.htm

for your future historical on nurses trapped on Bataan.

Stlight
02-04-2010, 10:42 AM
When you mention that something happened in '86 and the person you're speaking with asks, "Which century?"

Komnena
02-05-2010, 05:48 AM
You know you're a historian when a History Channel program describes an ape monster as having Cro-Magnon features and you scream at the TV for the bonehead mistake.

Bookewyrme
02-13-2010, 04:37 AM
....when even your Classics professors get tired of you dragging Ancient Egypt into every single lecture.

...when your next novel idea comes from a book you'll be using in your dissertation.

SirOtter
02-13-2010, 05:51 AM
...when you can walk into a room in which an old movie is playing on TCM and tell roughly what year it was made by the men's hats.

MarysGirl
02-15-2010, 09:08 PM
...when you stop watching The History Channel because of all the inaccuracies.

...when your husband gets you The World Encyclopedia of Archaeology for Valentine's Day.

Bookewyrme
02-16-2010, 07:38 AM
...when you stop watching The History Channel because of all the inaccuracies.



A-frickin'-men!

DustyBooks
02-16-2010, 09:51 PM
ALMOST all of the above, and

...when you would never even think of vacationing on some tropical island, as it would be a complete waste of a week, lying around doing nothing but sun and tropical umbrella drinks.

Especially when you could be at an archives somewhere researching, finding amazing stories on old newspaper microfilm, and thinking, "Holy crap! I could write a novel about that!"

Both of those are research when parts of your novel are set in Bermuda and Jamaica.

alex_falstone
02-17-2010, 12:05 AM
When you watch a film (despite being in 11 parts, and in Russian without subtitles) on YouTube because it deals with the period and some of the people you are researching - and you not only understand it, can source the documented provenance of some of Ivan the Terrible's dialogue, but even are able to list in boring detail what they got wrong.

Mind you, it looked awesome - suitably grotty with great texture and feel. The film by the way is "Tsar" directed by Pavel Lungin.

Kitti
02-17-2010, 04:55 AM
When you give people copies of your favorite microhistories, instead of novels, for their birthdays.

Sieglinde
02-22-2010, 02:07 PM
People don't dare to mention the Knights Templar because you'll immediately go into an analysis about how the last Capetings fell and what exactly led to the 100 years war...

You get very, very angry if people think "Les Mis takes place during the French Revolution / 1830 revolution / 1848". You tell a lot of details about June 5-6 of 1832.

DustyBooks
03-10-2010, 05:06 AM
...when your favorite method of procrastination while writing history papers is to research time periods other than the one you're supposed to be studying.

Mara
03-10-2010, 08:23 AM
...when you've accidentally cited a scholarly historical work during everyday conversation, especially when making an analogy. :)

(I slipped up and did this several times right after grad school, but it rarely happens now.)
--------------------------------------
Old argument, but it's "a historian" in American English. :)

(In American English, you use "a" if there's a consonent sound and "an" if there's a vowel sound. We pronounce the "h" in "historian" and "hotel," but not in "herb" or "hour." So, a historian, a hotel, an herb, an hour.)

DustyBooks
03-17-2010, 09:49 PM
...when you'd consider playing hooky from class to poke around in a museum archive.

eurodan49
03-17-2010, 11:53 PM
When you sleep with Sun Tzu, Herodotus and Plutarch under the pillow.

Eddyz Aquila
03-18-2010, 09:01 PM
When you do history notes for your exam as a break between your economics sessions...

When you take pleasure in writing a 4000 word essay on some obscure 1071 battle...

angeliz2k
03-18-2010, 10:45 PM
...when you come to England to study and don't go to the pub but go to Verulamium/St Albans instead.

...when you knew perfectly well long before going there that St Albans was Verulamium and was burned down by Boudica along with Londiunium and Camuludunum. In 61 AD.

...when you get excited about seeing the Black Prince'd tomb in Canterbury Cathedral. And about the candle in the place where Thomas a Beckett was murdered.

...when you go to Canterbury Cathedral on a weekday and are the only one under 70 there.

...when you're the only one in your graduate class who knows that there is a local museum, knows where it is, and has actually been there.

eurodan49
03-19-2010, 01:54 AM
When you’ve done your genealogic tree all the way to Ardi and call the Aethiopicus, Ergaster, Rudolfensis, and all the rest, uncles.

Deb Kinnard
03-19-2010, 06:16 AM
Angeliz, I'm so totally there with you. We stayed in St Albans in preference to London and took the tube back and forth. I loved the place and would go back in a snap.

...and when you snap the Sutton Hoo treasure instead of your traveling party.

khalleron
03-21-2010, 08:33 PM
When you're researching a novel, run across an interesting event that has nothing to do with it, but spend $90 ordering files from the National Archives because you just HAVE to know what the H--- happened!

I just did this. It was awesome.

DustyBooks
03-22-2010, 01:41 AM
...when you'd consider playing hooky from class to poke around in a museum archive.

On Friday I actually did skip class to go to the special archives, but not at the museum.

firedrake
03-22-2010, 06:48 PM
when you get annoyed by the bad PR Vikings have got over the centuries.

Monlette
03-25-2010, 04:29 AM
When you visit the Tower of London and you get more excited about the graffiti than you did over the crown jewels.

Kitti
03-25-2010, 09:00 AM
The graffiti is AWESOME! :Thumbs: And really, pouring over all the graffiti is soooo much more fun than standing in a huge long line just so you can hop on a conveyer belt and whoosh past a bunch of sparkly rocks.... ;)

Lyra Jean
03-25-2010, 09:09 AM
One of the most interesting things about the Castillo de San Marcos was the graffiti. Even my husband thought it was awesome.

Kenny
03-25-2010, 03:40 PM
The graffiti is AWESOME! :Thumbs: And really, pouring over all the graffiti is soooo much more fun than standing in a huge long line just so you can hop on a conveyer belt and whoosh past a bunch of sparkly rocks.... ;)
It was interesting to see the quality of some graffiti in the cells, I agree.

...when at the age of 10 you impress a museum curator with knowledge of random assorted items.

...when you are happy to look at 'bits of rock' in a prehistory museum (or part of one).

...when you know more about local history than a local. (In Canterbury, the area around the cathedral all had to have slate roofs because in the late 1100s there was a fire (started by accident by a money smith) and damaged the cathedral. The murder of, the before mentioned, Thomas Beckett happened at just the right time because they used the extra money to fix the cathedral.)

Sirius
03-25-2010, 04:12 PM
Combining two previous threads, here are the Maeshowe Viking graffiti;
http://www.orkneyjar.com/history/maeshowe/maeshrunes.htm

Hip-Hop-a-potamus
05-07-2010, 09:26 PM
When you visit the Tower of London and you get more excited about the graffiti than you did over the crown jewels.

Kind of like the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence. The toilets down in the very lower level obviously had very old plumbing. Someone had put up a sign saying "Please do not throw toilet paper in toilet." So of course, the grafitti artists had a ball, going down the wall in any language you can imagine, including Geordie English, Chinese, German, etc. And they were all kind enough to label theirs so you could recognize the language.

My favorite was the Australian: "Don't throw yer dunny paper in the dunny. No worries."

Lyra Jean
05-07-2010, 10:20 PM
When you find a village within your own town. In Bradenton on 119th street off of Cortez is the fishing village of Cortez. There is even a museum.

Cortez Village Historical Society (http://cortezvillage.org/default.aspx)

FreeWhistler
05-08-2010, 02:12 AM
... you'd rather translate Old English poetry than fill out a crossword puzzle or sudoku square.
... you say "larboard" instead of "port."
... you can identify all the sails and rigging on the HMS Victory and know how to use them.

RichardB
05-08-2010, 05:05 AM
When your kids pretend they are the Roosevelt children, and ask if they can bring a pony (which we don't have) upstairs in the elevator (which we also don't have).

Belle_91
05-08-2010, 05:09 AM
You look at a hot guy and imagine him in Regency-era clothing

Puma
05-08-2010, 07:31 AM
Cemeteries excite you.

Lyra Jean
05-08-2010, 07:50 AM
When your kids pretend they are the Roosevelt children, and ask if they can bring a pony (which we don't have) upstairs in the elevator (which we also don't have).

I think this is awesome.

SirOtter
05-08-2010, 08:00 AM
You look at a hot guy and imagine him in Regency-era clothing

Or a hot girl and imagine her in Etruscan costume. ;)

Lyra Jean
05-08-2010, 08:04 AM
Or a hot girl and imagine her in Etruscan costume. ;)

Etruscan wear clothes? ;)

Let's not forget the hot men in Gladiator costumes.

Kelsey
05-09-2010, 10:33 AM
During my European trip this Summer, I am making a stop in England just to go to Hever Castle to see what may or may not be Anne Boleyn's name etched into the staircase, something I missed on my last two trips to her childhood home...

angeliz2k
05-09-2010, 01:16 PM
During my European trip this Summer, I am making a stop in England just to go to Hever Castle to see what may or may not be Anne Boleyn's name etched into the staircase, something I missed on my last two trips to her childhood home...

I loved that place! I was just there a month ago. The "one mile country walk" was great, too.

I especially loved the family tree upstairs. It took a while to find Anne, Henry VIII, and Elizabeth, but I was just as pleased to pick out Lettice Knollys, Robert Dudley, and Lettice's son the Earl of Essex. I was running around like a kid in a candy shop, because almost every room in the palace is open to visitors. There are Anne's prayer books with her handwriting in them and the bedstead with her name carved into it (apparently by Victorians *rolls eyes*). I didn't see her name etched into the staircase, though!

Wonderful place!

Black Bird
05-09-2010, 01:34 PM
You have a zillion cable channels and it's on the history channel while your friends and family sit staring at you.

Rufus Coppertop
05-09-2010, 08:16 PM
You're willing to do five psychiatric night shifts to buy a complete 1807 edition of Holinshed's chronicles and you're actually going to read them.

Kelsey
05-10-2010, 09:35 AM
I loved that place! I was just there a month ago. The "one mile country walk" was great, too.

I especially loved the family tree upstairs. It took a while to find Anne, Henry VIII, and Elizabeth, but I was just as pleased to pick out Lettice Knollys, Robert Dudley, and Lettice's son the Earl of Essex. I was running around like a kid in a candy shop, because almost every room in the palace is open to visitors. There are Anne's prayer books with her handwriting in them and the bedstead with her name carved into it (apparently by Victorians *rolls eyes*). I didn't see her name etched into the staircase, though!

Wonderful place!

!!!111oneone

I had been to Hampton Court a million times, but Hever Castle was just sooo much better. I took the train out there from London and was a bit freaked because I got off the train alone, and the whole un-manned station thing worried me a bit. I walked out of the train station and asked two guys thatching a roof (I know!) where the castle was. That walk through the countryside was absurdly amazing. And then when I got to the actual castle, I practically had the place to myself. In June! I just loved everything about that place. I can't wait to go back this Summer.

debblen4
03-05-2013, 03:17 PM
When every time you see a road maintenance crew working on the road, you are reminded of how closely their new uniform matches the labourers clothing in the 1880s and then you happen to most enthusiastically tell your friend how much you love the new uniform because it makes the men look like they're a working crew from the 1880s - 1915s and he is appalled at your disregard for his comfort in the boiling sun (and gives you a lecture as to why he hates it).

I personally think that the designer of the uniform has a thing for the late 1800s - honestly they look like they have stepped out of a museum photo.

When you read a book in public and realise you are being stared at for muttering, "That didn't happen then. It was 3 years later."

When your sisters start talking fashion or contraceptives or even food and you find yourself quoting Mrs Beesby or some other source.

When you are teaching 5 & 6 year old students and someone asks a question and you find yourself in the middle of a history lesson.

When you find yourself thinking normal everyday things in old fashioned grammatical sentence structures - when you have to translate your words and sentences into modern speech.

Shall I continue?

gothicangel
03-05-2013, 04:09 PM
The highlight of your year is discovering they've published a new book on the Roman fort of Trimontium [even if it does cost £30, but heck it's a beautiful book. :)]

Great thread though [even if it is a zombie!]

clee984
03-05-2013, 04:12 PM
Walking around the Churchill museum and cabinet war rooms in Whitehall, one of your best friends tells you that he is going to find a cleaning lady because you're so overexcited it looks like you're about to wet yourself.

Work colleagues are astounded when you can name all the prime ministers of Great Britain going back to the early 1800s.

Add: and you watch episodes of the sitcom 'Peep Show', notice the book that the character Mark is reading, and think "hey, I've read that......."

ConnieBDowell
03-05-2013, 06:20 PM
...when you watch historical documentaries precisely so you can point out their inaccuracies.

Yes, I have done this embarrassing thing.

angeliz2k
03-05-2013, 06:24 PM
When other people listen to music or comedy at work, but you listen to CSPAN's American history lectures.

When you have a heart attack because you're roommate says, "What's that?" when you say you're going to Antietam. (Seriously, we live in Virginia. I think it's obligatory to know at least a little Civil War history.)

When you can easily name every British king and queen going back to Richard II and, at a stretch, all the way back to William the Conqueror. Oh, and if you can explain the dynastic relationships between all those kings and queens--yes, even George I's and Henry VII's distant claims to the throne.

Snowstorm
03-05-2013, 06:57 PM
UNDERWEAR! What was their underwear like!?

gothicangel
03-05-2013, 07:22 PM
When you can easily name every British king and queen going back to Richard II and, at a stretch, all the way back to William the Conqueror. Oh, and if you can explain the dynastic relationships between all those kings and queens--yes, even George I's and Henry VII's distant claims to the throne.

What if you can name the Kings of Northumbria and Pictland? :tongue

dolores haze
03-05-2013, 07:23 PM
When you have lengthy discussions with your 9 year old about the siege of Stalingrad, the Cuban missile crisis and trench warfare.

Flicka
03-05-2013, 10:21 PM
When you try to understand the behaviour of people around you by comparing them with Kaiser Wilhelm and dead British administrators of the Punjab. Also when you decide to use your vacation time for archival research.

etcetc
03-05-2013, 10:52 PM
When you're trying to figure out how to apply 25 different Oxford footnote formats for different types of primary sources for your effing history thesis, with one hour till the deadline.
... or maybe that's just 'you know you're a student when...'

gothicangel
03-05-2013, 11:01 PM
When you're trying to figure out how to apply 25 different Oxford footnote formats for different types of primary sources for your effing history thesis, with one hour till the deadline.
... or maybe that's just 'you know you're a student when...'

So true. I've just posted a question of Blackboard: why does the teaching materials say BC/AD. My last university insisted on using BCE/CE. Where the heck is the department's style guide! ;)

Cav Guy
03-06-2013, 12:22 AM
When you have lengthy discussions with your 9 year old about the siege of Stalingrad, the Cuban missile crisis and trench warfare.

When you HAVE those kinds of discussions (or try to at any rate) when you're 9 yourself!

SpinningWheel
03-07-2013, 06:28 PM
When you interrupt an enjoyable session in bed by needing to tell your husband what the penance would have been for that if you'd done it in the eleventh century.

Rachel Udin
03-09-2013, 05:19 AM
... when you start saying it is relative to who is writing the truth.
... when you are geeky enough to know where the "You know you're _blank_ when..." came from and why it came about. (Internet history)
... when you find an obscure bit of history and auto-wonder how you can make it into a story

When you interrupt an enjoyable session in bed by needing to tell your husband what the penance would have been for that if you'd done it in the eleventh century.
... when you see an answer like this and auto-chime like a donkey, which country and date? XD

gothicangel
03-10-2013, 01:19 AM
When you get glowered at because you dared to tell someone that there's no evidence that ancient Druids used Stonehenge.

Happened to me today, I've never seen someone turn rabid infront of my eyes before.

flapperphilosopher
03-10-2013, 05:49 AM
You definitely know you're a photo historian when you have to shove LIFE magazines out of the way to eat, you're constantly slipping on loose carte-de-visite sleeves (archival plastic!), and you have to fight the urge to carry a daguerreotype in your purse to show random strangers how amazing they are.

This thread is great. :)

angeliz2k
03-10-2013, 06:56 AM
...When you're watching a documentary, and they're talking about the Gettysburg Address, and they show an image of a speech inscribed on the Lincoln Memorial, but it's the wrong speech and YOU NOTICE. Instead of showing the Gettysburg Address as it appears on the walls of the Lincoln Memorial, they were showing the Second Inaugural as it appears on the walls of the Lincoln Memorial.

DianeL
03-10-2013, 10:02 PM
Rachel, "You know you're a ____ when" way predates the internet. I know I do, and that's been around all *my* life at least. :)

This may not fit, but I had a "come ON" historical accuracy attack when people started wigging about Sophia Coppola's soundtrack for "Marie Antoinette" ... anyone who thinks ANY historical drama has a period accurate soundtrack is dreaming. I liked her intentional anachronism, because sometimes the pretense by productions that they're anything like period-appropriate is ridiculous.

Watching docs and spotting inaccuracies - check. My mom also used to love to watch historical movies and spot the jet contrails in the sky. Heh.

Pup
03-10-2013, 10:26 PM
Rachel, "You know you're a ____ when" way predates the internet. I know I do, and that's been around all *my* life at least. :)

You know you're a historian when you read a statement like that, agree with it, want to find some evidence, and actually can (http://books.google.com/books?id=NYVqAAAACAAJ) (though that book in 1978 was surely just part of an already-established meme in its day too). :)

DianeL
03-11-2013, 06:59 AM
Hi, Pup! Way back when I was a kid (about the time of that book you linked), we didn't call them memes. It was just an expression. :) Some things people think are internet phenomena actually were a part of the language well before the internet.

And now I feel like I know I am history itself. It still weirds me out that there are mature people who never experienced life without Teh Intarwebs!

Pup
03-11-2013, 07:29 AM
Hi, Pup! Way back when I was a kid (about the time of that book you linked), we didn't call them memes. It was just an expression. :)

Ahem. :)

Memes and the Evolution of Culture (http://books.google.com/books?id=P6lRgAmsp9gC&pg=PA208&output=html)by Richard Dawkins, New Scientist, Oct. 28, 1976.

Though admittedly "meme" wasn't a terribly common word at the time. Its upsurge in usage to describe common catch-phrases is a meme in itself. ;)

DianeL
03-12-2013, 04:42 AM
I know how old the concept is. I'm rather older. And we did call them expressions. (Dawkins has never been my go-to for philosophy or language.) :)

Pup
03-12-2013, 06:09 AM
I know how old the concept is. I'm rather older. And we did call them expressions. (Dawkins has never been my go-to for philosophy or language.) :)

Yes, I was just kidding. :) I can only remember "meme" used as a new sort of intellectual or scientific term back then in an obscure niche, and certainly not as a common--um--expression like it is today.

Edited to add: I'm older than I look in my avatar, if you calculate it in people years. ;)

DianeL
03-13-2013, 04:42 AM
Oh but your avatar is adorable and grin-inducing!

Miller Robert
03-22-2013, 03:32 PM
writing scientific articles

VioletK
03-30-2013, 09:20 PM
when a detailed family tree of the people you are writing (that you made) about is on your refrigerator next to the coupons and bills.

Sunflowerrei
03-31-2013, 12:14 PM
You know you're a historian when...

...the last five books you bought on Amazon are all about your time period.
...when you search through GoogleBooks just to "check one more time" on something
...when you watch "Garrow's Law" and know that William Garrow didn't try that particular case, but you hop up and down in your chair simply because they're mentioning the Zong or the London Corresponding Society.
...when you flabbergast your best friend, who is a research assistant for a law professor. She's researching Lord Mansfield. You: "Tell me everything you've found. Now."

Sunflowerrei
04-06-2013, 06:27 AM
When reading an old manuscript with those s's that look like f's don't phase you anymore.

ULTRAGOTHA
04-06-2013, 06:41 AM
When someone on the board mixes up Harold Godwinsson with Harald Hardrada and you correct it, even though it has nothing to do with the thread.

:e2paperba

Ellaroni
04-06-2013, 11:48 PM
When someone on the board mixes up Harold Godwinsson with Harald Hardrada and you correct it, even though it has nothing to do with the thread.

:e2paperba

This Friday lunch at work, we were three history teachers discussing the norse backgrounds of 1066's Harold and Harald and William. The discussion was so enthusiastic other teachers forgot to eat.

Belle_91
04-07-2013, 01:02 AM
You know you're a history major/historian when you stay up at night afraid you won't find a job and will wind up living in a box or a van down by the river.

SpinningWheel
04-07-2013, 02:49 PM
You know you're a history major/historian when you stay up at night afraid you won't find a job and will wind up living in a box or a van down by the river.

And you know you're a historical novelist when you reflect that at least the experience of living in a van might give you a tiny bit more insight into what it was like to be poor in the Great Depression.

Urnathok
04-15-2013, 11:06 PM
When a comment about where the phrase 'vandalism' originated sparks a multi-paragraph 'brief' explanation of European tribal movements in late antiquity.

When a joke about WWI's causes with a friend goes on for over five minutes.

When you do an impression of Pope Alexander VI at a party.

pezerp59
05-15-2013, 06:39 PM
When you know the Mini-ball was named after a French doctor named Minet.

Pup
05-15-2013, 06:43 PM
When you know the Mini-ball was named after a French doctor named Minet.

And you know off the top of your head that it's spelled Minie, with an accent over the "e" that I don't know how to do. :)

Swordswoman
05-15-2013, 07:02 PM
When you know you know nothing.

When you're ready to learn.

When you hear someone say something that doesn't fit with your knowledge, and your reaction is not 'Ha! You're so wrong!' but 'Wow! That's really interesting. Can you tell me your source?'

Historians are a lot rarer than historical novelists. I'm in the latter category, but if I keep really working at it and learn to maintain an open mind then I hope one day to qualify as the former.

One day.

KayEn78
05-26-2013, 07:27 AM
Your husband doesn't even know the basics of WWII and you teach him about them and then some.

You go that extra mile with research making sure every aspect of the time period in your story is authentic and accurate.

You point out obvious anachranisms in books, documentaries and movies as well as find a few that only you would know.

Your family says you are "the sesspool of useless knowledge."

You think, when did that come out? I wonder how old that is?

You know the years of when popular songs of the '30s, '40s, '50s, and '60s came out, but you were born in 1978.

On a future vacation to TN, one of the highlights of the trip is visiting an antique store called, Rare Bird Antiques. Yes, they sell actual items from the 1940s.

When you would like to visit the National D-Day Museum one day.

When the highlight of your Washington D.C. trip is visiting the war memorials.

When you work out at the Y, on your Ipod is not music, but Old Time Radio shows like Fibber McGee and Molly to help that hour on the bike move along just a bit faster.

-Kristi

BradyH1861
05-26-2013, 08:09 AM
When you know more about Civil War fashion than modern fashion.

Flicka
05-26-2013, 02:11 PM
When you realise that 90% of your Twitter feed consists of historians, and you have meaningful convos on there about things like gender bias in 19th century murder ballads... Not to mention completely fangirling when a fave historian retweets you. :)

Swordswoman
05-26-2013, 05:54 PM
When you're asked to give the final 'keynote' speech at an academic conference on your subject... :)

And are absolutely bloody terrified because you know you've done less than five years of research and are really one hell of a fraud...:cry:

DeleyanLee
05-26-2013, 07:18 PM
When you get the total of your purchase from the cashier (under $20, of course) and you immediately think of 5-10 important events from that year.

Flicka
05-26-2013, 07:53 PM
When you're asked to give the final 'keynote' speech at an academic conference on your subject... :)

And are absolutely bloody terrified because you know you've done less than five years of research and are really one hell of a fraud...:cry:

Congratulations! I'm sure you'll blow them away!

gothicangel
05-26-2013, 10:00 PM
When you burst into tears because you've just been offered a job with English Heritage. :)

DianeL
05-27-2013, 06:21 AM
When you get the total of your purchase from the cashier (under $20, of course) and you immediately think of 5-10 important events from that year.

Wait.

There are people who do not do this??? :P


CONGRATULATIONS Swordsman and Gothicangel!

DeleyanLee
05-27-2013, 06:54 AM
Wait.

There are people who do not do this??? :P

Actually, I'm a cashier--I find myself doing it all the time. It's a way to stay amused at a fairly boring job.

Cornelius Gault
05-27-2013, 08:40 AM
... when you look up words in the dictionary to find out how they were spelled in the 1800s so you can give your dialog a Victorian flair.

BradyH1861
05-27-2013, 09:03 PM
When you refer to historical figures by their first names and think of them as old friends.

SpinningWheel
06-06-2013, 02:36 AM
When you tell your husband a five year old boy in a nearby village was fatally attacked by pigs and he is horrified, because you forgot to mention it was 500 years ago....

firedrake
06-06-2013, 02:41 AM
When (as an editor) you read through a new submission and find yourself fact-checking (a) When Levis became available in the US (b) when was ice cream widely available in the US (c) when blueberries were first cultivated in France even before you've declined or accepted the novel.

Yours sincerely,

Compulsive fact checker.

SpinningWheel
06-06-2013, 02:55 AM
When (as an editor) you read through a new submission and find yourself fact-checking (a) When Levis became available in the US (b) when was ice cream widely available in the US (c) when blueberries were first cultivated in France even before you've declined or accepted the novel.

Yours sincerely,

Compulsive fact checker.

When were blueberries first cultivated in France?

Yours sincerely,

Compulsive accumulator of random historical facts

flapperphilosopher
06-06-2013, 04:56 PM
When you get the total of your purchase from the cashier (under $20, of course) and you immediately think of 5-10 important events from that year.

Hahaha, I always do this with numbers that are years. I love that my apartment is 1910, though I'm jealous of whoever lives in 1914 because it's a more significant year.

firedrake
06-06-2013, 05:04 PM
When were blueberries first cultivated in France?

Yours sincerely,

Compulsive accumulator of random historical facts

Commercial cultivation of blueberries did not start in Europe until the 1930s. I edited a book set in the late 19th century France where the author had the MC colouring cake icing with blueberries. When I told the author that it wouldn't have been possible, and suggested other fruit (blackcurrants, blackberries) she went to her local supermarket and bought blackberries and made several batches of icing until she got the colour right, so she could replace blueberries with blackberries in the book. I was so impressed by her diligence and the cupcakes she made looked pretty bloody good with that blackberry icing too. :D (she sent me photos of the final batch).

Flicka
06-06-2013, 05:49 PM
double post, oops

Flicka
06-06-2013, 06:01 PM
Commercial cultivation of blueberries did not start in Europe until the 1930s. I edited a book set in the late 19th century France where the author had the MC colouring cake icing with blueberries. When I told the author that it wouldn't have been possible, and suggested other fruit (blackcurrants, blackberries) she went to her local supermarket and bought blackberries and made several batches of icing until she got the colour right, so she could replace blueberries with blackberries in the book. I was so impressed by her diligence and the cupcakes she made looked pretty bloody good with that blackberry icing too. :D (she sent me photos of the final batch).

Stupid question, but why? Blueberries (European blueberries, obviously, not the American kind, but both belong to the vaccinium family and are distinctly purplish blue berries) grow wild in parts France as far as I know (they're called bilberries (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilberry) in English, blåbär in Swedish, blaeberries in Scottish and myrtilles (http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myrtille) in French) and you find them in plenty of old recipes. Though not grown commercially you could certainly get blueberries even in cities in here Sweden in the 19th century (in season of course) even though they were not commercially grown, since you find tons in virtually all woods here (wikipedia claims blueberry plants cover 17% of Sweden). They were used both for medical purposes (for fever among other things), food and dye. So I don't see why someone in 19th century France could not have used myrtilles to dye something.

1930s was when American blueberries were first introduced (to be commercially grown) here (though we still don't have them in Sweden; our "blåbär" are strictly the native, wild kind), but we certainly had European "blueberries" here before that. So the problem wasn't really the berries but that she used the wrong name for them - she should have called them by the old British word bilberries.

firedrake
06-06-2013, 06:11 PM
Stupid question, but why? Blueberries (European blueberries, obviously, not the American kind, but both belong to the vaccinium family and are distinctly purplish blue berries) grow wild in parts France as far as I know (they're called bilberries (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilberry) in English, blåbär in Swedish, blaeberries in Scottish and myrtilles (http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myrtille) in French) and you find them in plenty of old recipes. Though not grown commercially you could certainly get blueberries even in cities in here Sweden in the 19th century (in season of course) even though they were not commercially grown, since you find tons in virtually all woods here (wikipedia claims blueberry plants cover 17% of Sweden). They were used both for medical purposes (for fever among other things), food and dye. So I don't see why someone in 19th century France could not have used myrtilles to dye something.

1930s was when American blueberries were first introduced (to be commercially grown) here (though we still don't have them in Sweden; our "blåbär" are strictly the native, wild kind), but we certainly had European "blueberries" here before that. So the problem wasn't really the berries but that she used the wrong name for them - she should have called them by the old British word bilberries.

Not being a fruit expert, I didn't know about bilberries.

Flicka
06-06-2013, 06:20 PM
Not being a fruit expert, I didn't know about bilberries.

Neither do most other people which is why blåbär here are usually translated blueberries too (we only have one word for the two kinds) and I think it isn't unusual that myrtilles are translated as blueberries in France either (but calling upon my own memory here). It might well have been the obvious choice for her character which was my point.

This is why historical research is so tricky. How you phrase your question may exclude the most obvious answer.

Pup
06-06-2013, 09:20 PM
So the problem wasn't really the berries but that she used the wrong name for them - she should have called them by the old British word bilberries.

Seems similar to the situation in the US. Commercial blueberries weren't grown here either until later, but one sees "whortleberries" as well as "blueberries" and other names in 19th century recipes, but they were being picked wild. In Maine or Massachusetts, they wouldn't be unusual at all. Outside of their natural range, they'd be less likely compared to more familiar berries, either local or commercial, but there's another choice that would require thinking even further outside the box:


This is why historical research is so tricky. How you phrase your question may exclude the most obvious answer.

Yep. In the 19th century US at least, cochineal (https://www.google.com/search?tbo=p&tbm=bks&q=test&tbs=,cdr:1,cd_max:Dec+31_2+1865&num=10#q=%22pink+icing%22&safe=off&hl=en&tbs=cdr:1,cd_min:1800,cd_max:1899&tbm=bks&source=lnt&sa=X&ei=s6ywUY-vA8SxyQGTl4DIDA&ved=0CCMQpwUoAw&bav=on.2,or.r_qf.&fp=a4f445e7eebaf29b&biw=1056&bih=589)was mentioned as often for coloring icing as any kind of berry. Don't know if it was as common in France, but I've seen it in 19th century English books about French foods.

Elias Graves
06-20-2013, 11:46 PM
...when, as a boy, your father buys a 40 acre plot of land for hunting, fishing and camping but you grab the shovel to begin excavating the ruins of the old house and barn...

Sunflowerrei
06-21-2013, 11:48 AM
When you walk the Freedom Trail with your best friend and you come to a section that isn't as red as the rest of the trail: "Oh, this must be the Alien and Sedition Act."

gothicangel
01-10-2014, 12:36 AM
When your researching a Roman general called Lollius Urbicus and Google suggests Lollipop Urbicus. :cry:

DianeL
01-11-2014, 11:28 PM
Oh, GOOGLE. *Facepalm*

RationalIdealist
01-29-2014, 01:35 PM
You read The Forty-Eighters: Political Refugees of the German Revolution of 1848 by A.E. Zucker for fun. It's a fascinating book, by the way. :)

You know when "doggone" came into popular vocabulary but are unsure of the exact meanings of modern slang words.

You go on and on about the "corset controversy" and Manifest Destiny even when your friends are determinedly yawning.

You insist on visiting an old mansion, palace, museum, cemetery, or living history event on every family trip.

Nikweikel
02-04-2014, 04:21 AM
A professor claims that Machiavelli wrote "The Prince" for a bit of a laugh, since he was the "Stephen Colbert of his time"--and you visualize what Machiavelli's head would look like on a pike for being the "Stephen Colbert of his time."

(Explanation: Newly minted monarchs didn't see the value in tongue-in-cheek humor about their right to rule from people they'd had tortured for suspected treason just a short time earlier.)

gothicangel
02-04-2014, 12:44 PM
When your researching a Roman general called Lollius Urbicus and Google suggests Lollipop Urbicus. :cry:

When you discover after reading a biography on Hadrian, that you character is African, and you cry out to the gods "why didn't someone mention this before?" (Seriously, it isn't in any of the books I've read about Urbicus, just a line in Anthony Birley's Hadrian. I must have read a dozen books about Urbicus and the Antonine Wall, and not a peep.) :rant:

Natira
02-04-2014, 01:31 PM
...you can name all the pharoahs of any dynasty in ancient Egypt, but cannot remember who's running your own country, state or city right now.

Not just that, but when you can go on endlessly about it too!
"... and that concluded the Ptolemy dynasty--"
"Hey what about Obama?"
"Who's that? Hey! Also King Tut..."

:)

Natira
02-04-2014, 01:38 PM
Also, when you unintentionally put a history joke into a story and then realize after the fact, only to leave it in and wonder how many people will actually get it.