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View Full Version : Multiple parts in a novel


EndlessDestiny
12-04-2008, 01:26 AM
The book I'm working on has two parts to it. Part 1 is around 32K and part 2 has about 46K. How do agents/publishers feel about this sort of thing? Are these word counts good?

Varthikes
12-04-2008, 01:34 AM
Shouldn't be a problem.

I've seen hundreds of books on the shelves that are told in multiple parts of varying lengths.

Danthia
12-04-2008, 01:49 AM
Plenty of books are broken into parts. Usually it involves a time jump, but not always. As long as the break makes sense and it all works together it's fine.

Word count depends on your genre. 78K is pretty middle of the road, so you're likely fine with most genres. Might be a tad low for fantasy or historical fiction, but that's not a bad thing if the story is good.

Gillhoughly
12-04-2008, 02:32 AM
Write well and agents tend to react very well indeed.

Noah Body
12-04-2008, 02:35 AM
Write well and agents tend to react very well indeed.

Damn, that's what I've been overlooking!

blacbird
12-04-2008, 04:23 AM
Write well and agents tend to react very well indeed.

You make it so damn complicated.

caw

Gillhoughly
12-04-2008, 04:32 AM
.
.
.

:D

AuthorGuy
12-04-2008, 09:10 PM
Write well and agents tend to react very well indeed.
If you can get an agent to pay attention to it in the first place. The ability to write query letters may not be in synch with your ability to write the novel it's about. A good marketer with a mediocre product is still going to get the nod.

KTC
12-04-2008, 09:16 PM
A good marketer with a mediocre product is still going to get the nod.


I'm sorry, what? You're suggesting that an excellent query with a mediocre novel backing it up is going to be successful? With all due respect-- THINK AGAIN.

maestrowork
12-04-2008, 09:28 PM
Parts are no problem.

Volumes, however....

;)

maestrowork
12-04-2008, 09:29 PM
I'm sorry, what? You're suggesting that an excellent query with a mediocre novel backing it up is going to be successful? With all due respect-- THINK AGAIN.

I agree. A great query will get you read. But it won't get you the contract.

That's not to say every book published is a gem. There is some crud out there, but they're still better than 95% of what's being submitted (that makes you shudder and wonder: what DOES the slush pile look like?)

scarletpeaches
12-04-2008, 09:32 PM
I'm sorry, what? You're suggesting that an excellent query with a mediocre novel backing it up is going to be successful? With all due respect-- THINK AGAIN.

There are enough mediocre novels on the market to prove this is true. After a novel has been accepted, hype can do wonderful things for book sales. Just ask Dan Brown.

Gillhoughly
12-04-2008, 09:59 PM
A good marketer with a mediocre product is still going to get the nod.

Yes, if one is selling Amway, but a good agent is going to be seeking something she can sell to a publisher.

Nothing changes the basic rule that you have to write words that are worth buying.

I had the worst query in the world. I knew it, the editors knew it. But once my writing got up to snuff that changed everything.

It took me two years, 25 rewrites on chapter one and 2-3 full rewrites of the whole book (on a MANUAL typewriter, yet), but I sold that first book.

Absolutely yes, TERRIBLE books get into print. I know for a fact that my writing is miles better than several undeserving hacks on the NYT list, but it's a part of the industry that s**t happens. You just keep writing.

I can drop the hint that helped me to sell that first one:

Make sure your opening is such that it will distract a tired, bleary-eyed slush pile reader from a subway full of muggers and cause her to miss her stop home.

When that happened to me she took my 50 pages and synopsis up the food chain to the senior editor.

Thankfully they ignored my horrible query letter and bought the book.

And just so you know--after more than 20 novels sold I STILL can't write a good query!

KTC
12-04-2008, 10:02 PM
Yes, if one is selling Amway, but a good agent is going to be seeking something she can sell to a publisher.

Nothing changes the basic rule that you have to write words that are worth buying.

I had the worst query in the world. I knew it, the editors knew it. But once my writing got up to snuff that changed everything.

It took me two years, 25 rewrites on chapter one and 2-3 full rewrites of the whole book (on a MANUAL typewriter, yet), but I sold that first book.

Absolutely yes, TERRIBLE books get into print. I know for a fact that my writing is miles better than several undeserving hacks on the NYT list, but it's a part of the industry that s**t happens. You just keep writing.

I can drop the hint that helped me to sell that first one:

Make sure your opening is such that it will distract a tired, bleary-eyed slush pile reader from a subway full of muggers and cause her to miss her stop home.

When that happened to me she took my 50 pages and synopsis up the food chain to the senior editor.

Thankfully they ignored my horrible query letter and bought the book.

And just so you know--after more than 20 novels sold I STILL can't write a good query!

Great story. Thanks for sharing it. Now I will forever imagine readers on subways whenever I'm sending mine out. (-;

seun
12-05-2008, 12:43 AM
There are enough mediocre novels on the market to prove this is true. After a novel has been accepted, hype can do wonderful things for book sales. Just ask Dan Brown.

That explains some of the shit I see at work.

NeoWrite
12-05-2008, 06:12 AM
Hey! Two parters are very interesting!
Later!