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underthecity
09-24-2008, 06:49 PM
Although I'm employed, I'm looking for a new job.

I've submitted my resume to two different companies this week (through careerbuilder.com).

I wondered if it was appropriate to follow up on these submissions through a phone call or email.

I searched online and found many contradicting comments: Yes, follow up, it shows you want the job. No, don't call, you'll be considered a pest. Email 24 hours after submission. Email one week after submission. Don't email, they don't want to hear from you. Snail mail a resume one week after the online submission.

So which is it? Has anyone you know ever gotten a job by following up and being persistent? I've actually never heard of anyone saying "it worked for me."

allen

cray
09-24-2008, 07:07 PM
it's too late now but in truth this is where recruiters can be an ginormous help.
they are paid to do the pestering for you.


that said, a call or email to make sure they rec'd your stuff is not out of line.
personally, i'd go with a call.

Pagey's_Girl
09-24-2008, 07:47 PM
If you don't hear back in say, two or three days, I'd give a quick call to make sure it got there in one (electronic) piece. But it can take awhile. I had several places that didn't call me for a few weeks -and several, like the place I'm working now, who called back within a day or two.

sunna
09-24-2008, 08:03 PM
Unless their websites specifically say "don't call us", there's nothing wrong with checking in just to see if your materials were received. Since you already submitted electronically, a call is probably better, plus if you get someone willing to talk you might get more info about the job, or at least catch someone's attention. Give it a few days first, so you don't look overeager - and, as Pagey'sGirl said, remember it can take a bit for people to get back. I get to answer those calls all the time, for searches that sometimes can take months.


Good luck! I'll keep my fingers crossed for you.

Shadow_Ferret
09-24-2008, 08:03 PM
I've always treated resumes like I treat queries. I send them out and forget about them.

willfulone
09-24-2008, 08:56 PM
I used to hire employees. A personal note to convey your interest (snail mail) or a call is not amiss. I know with the internet, emails are common. But, they are impersonal, they convey you are just one of the same and often end up in spam for their computer system will not recognize you (or they do not bother with reading that type of email for they get tons and trash it anyway without reading past "I recently sent you a resume'").

You do not have to be aggressive or overly persistent to show your interest. A tasteful hand written note got interviewees further with me than a ton of "call me" messages.

I hope it works out for you!

Christine

underthecity
09-24-2008, 09:28 PM
Christine,

Thanks for the suggestion. I can certainly send a brief note. Do I address it to the hiring manager? (One job posting had a contact name, the other did not.) Should I include my resume?

allen

CharlieBabbitt
09-24-2008, 10:02 PM
Hi Allen,

I have hired many people for our company -- and still do. A polite follow-up call or email always gets my attention and I don't ever think it is out of line (the first time, anyway!). Be sure to leave your email address in a phone message with your phone number. Sometimes it's just easier to email a reply.

Also -- always (ALWAYS) include a personal letter when you send your resume via careerbuilder (or other site). It will separate you from the pack. I get soooo many resumes that don't include an intro letter and I just know that the person just forwarded their resume without really thinking about the job. Anyone with a letter automatically gets more consideration. It's a great opportunity for you to tell the hiring person why exactly you are right for the job.

Good luck!

underthecity
09-24-2008, 11:45 PM
Thanks Charlie, now I'm torn between a phone call or a snailmail letter.

What does one say in the follow-up letter?

I'm trying extra hard this time around because they're both technical-writing type jobs. And I'd really like to do that.

Oh, and I always write a tailored cover letter for my online submissions.

CharlieBabbitt
09-25-2008, 02:30 AM
If this is a follow-up to see if they received your resume, then I would call or send an email -- a simple, Good afternoon, I'm so and so just following up to see if you received my resume for the such and such position you currently have open. Please let me know if you have any questions or if I can provide additional information. Thank you.

If it's after an interview, then a personal note sent that afternoon is a very nice touch. Basically -- I enjoyed meeting with you today. The position (or the company) sounds exciting (whatever fits here) and I appreciate the consideration. Please contact me with any additional questions. Thank you.

You are already ahead of the game with an intro letter -- keeping in touch is bonus!

underthecity
09-25-2008, 03:09 AM
Well, I did it. I snail-mailed out letters, fresh resumes, and each got a clip of one of my technical magazine articles. I figured the clips couldn't hurt.

I called the company that didn't have a contact name and asked for a name, but the person who answered the phone said that "all of that is done online through careerbuilder." Oh well, I did try.

My question for you, charliebabbit (besides, "How's Rain Man?") is what kind of difference did the follow-up emails/phone calls/letters make to you, the hiring manager? Did they influence you in any way?

Bayou Bill
09-25-2008, 04:45 AM
Although I'm employed, I'm looking for a new job.

I've submitted my resume to two different companies this week (through careerbuilder.com).

I wondered if it was appropriate to follow up on these submissions through a phone call or email.

I searched online and found many contradicting comments: Yes, follow up, it shows you want the job. No, don't call, you'll be considered a pest. Email 24 hours after submission. Email one week after submission. Don't email, they don't want to hear from you. Snail mail a resume one week after the online submission.

So which is it? Has anyone you know ever gotten a job by following up and being persistent? I've actually never heard of anyone saying "it worked for me."

allen
Do NOT call unless it's unavoidable.

We call at our convenience. We answer at our inconvenience. E-mails or letters are fine. They don't interrupt the person you're contacting and make them drop everything to respond to your question. If the company uses voice mail as a screening device, then the phone call becomes less intrusive. However, I'd still favor using an e-mail message.

As Charlie said, if you do get an interview, write a "thank you" note afterwards. It's a common courtesy that reminds the interviewer who you are and creates a good impression.

Good luck.

Bayou Bill :cool:

Pagey's_Girl
09-25-2008, 06:19 AM
I think following up with clips of your articles was a great idea.

CharlieBabbitt
09-25-2008, 06:34 AM
Allen,

The follow-ups did matter to me -- mainly in the sense that I get so many resumes from people who are barely qualified, who don't even live in the same state -- I know they are just replying to the CareerBuilder "apply" button and I find it frustrating.

Anyone who writes me (with an intro letter with the resume and/or an email follow-up), I know they are truly interested in the position, so I give them a good look. It doesn't mean I grant an interview, but I make sure to thoroughly examine their credentials, etc.

And the clippings was a great idea. I hope it works out for you!