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Mr Sci Fi
06-19-2008, 10:42 PM
I've been unproductive lately (No big surprise) and felt that I needed a confidence booster. I wrote up these ten creeds and proudly display them in front of my monitor, reading over them for inspiration. I've decided to make following this list my long-term goal, and hopefully it inspires others.

The Ten Creeds of Writing


1. You have permission to write utter, deplorable crap, so long as you get something done.

2. You have permission to write whatever you want - Prose, poetry, journal, blog - and in any genre you want, so long as you get something done.

3. You have permission to excuse yourself from quality, as you're still new at this game, so long as you get something done.

4. You will not fear critique, knowing that you can't please everybody anyway, so long as you get something done.

5. You will schedule yourself a specific block of time when you absolutely must write, and then write on creative epiphanies later, so long as you get something done.

6. You will read anything you get your hands on, from authors familiar and unfamiliar, and then you will use them as inspiration to write something better, so long as you get something done.

7. You will listen to your characters and tell their tales as truthfully as possible, regardless if you have absolutely no idea how to go about it, so long as you get something done.

8. You have permission to remain humble and occasionally dejected, remembering that a wise man once said that confidence is a consolation prize to those less talented, so long as you get something done.

9. You have permission to place your rejection letters in a folder marked "Rejects" and compare it to a folder marked "Accepted." Your reject folder will be a lot thicker at first, but eventually your accepted folder will be thick enough, but never quite thicker than the reject, that you can live with it, and it doesn't matter, so long as you get something done.

10. You will never quit this game because you love it with all your heart, and nothing else matters so long as you get something done.

MelancholyMan
06-20-2008, 12:08 AM
That is good stuff but I would add the following:

11) Revision
12) Revision
13) Revision
14) Revision
15) Revision
16) Revision
17) Revision
18) Revision
19) Revision
20) Revision

Rejections: 100+

-MM

VGrossack
06-20-2008, 03:30 PM
Very nice! A reminder to get back to work.

Captshady
06-20-2008, 07:15 PM
I like it!

Mr Sci Fi
06-20-2008, 07:17 PM
That is good stuff but I would add the following:

11) Revision
12) Revision
13) Revision
14) Revision
15) Revision
16) Revision
17) Revision
18) Revision
19) Revision
20) Revision

Rejections: 100+

-MM

Ha, aint that the truth.

Lyra Jean
06-20-2008, 08:28 PM
So long as you get something done. I really like that caveat.

My mom follows this mantra. She's at 18,000 words last time she told me.

Jcomp
06-20-2008, 08:54 PM
Seriously, coupled with the "revisions" post, sound advice. I try to keep that in mind, lest overthinking paralyze me. To quote Hemingway, "The first draft of everything is sh**." Still put in the effort to make it as good as you can the 1st time around, but know that a rewrite, or two, or twenty, is all but guaranteed anyway. So don't let fear of not getting it right freeze you up.

"Get Something Done." I agree...

crimsonlaw
06-20-2008, 09:18 PM
Awesome advice. This should be taped to my computer screen and tattooed on the back of both of my hands!

Mr Sci Fi
06-20-2008, 10:04 PM
I'm glad it's helped others as it did me. In no way is any of this law, just a few words that helped inspire me to be more productive.

MsJudy
06-21-2008, 01:07 AM
I gave myself something of a similar creed a little over a year ago. I'd written my first book, took me about five years to get it done, and everyone passed on it. I realized I had to find a way to be a little more productive, as you say! So I made myself a promise that I would write something every day, even if it was just a note in my journal about why I couldn't write anything else that day.

A year later, I have one book in its third and hopefully final revision, ready to start querying at the end of the summer, and another first draft finished and starting on its revisions. Plus a notebook of ideas for next projects.

It really, really works!