Interview: Joe M. McDermott

Joe M. McDermott is the author of seven novels and two short story collections. His latest novel, Fortress at the End of Time, comes out on January 17, 2017, from Tor.com. He holds a BA in Creative Writing from the University of Houston, and an MFA in Popular Fiction from the Stonecoast Program of the University of Southern Maine

What made you think of using a monastic system in a universe with clones and an ansible in The Fortress at the End of Time ?

I think too many of the futures that I read about create a strange sense that everyone’s soul is going to the same place when they die, and theological controversies only exist in that they help the plot along or not. Spirituality is such a wild and wooly field of human energy, and I hoped to try and capture a sense that faith and organized religion and atheism and agnosticism will all still be rattling around people’s heads even when we’ve extended our reach into the Sagittarius Cluster.

Did you have a playlist for The Fortress at the End of Time?

I wrote much of the book’s first draft longhand while working at a bookstore. We played, mostly, the local public classical radio station. I recall a lot of Edvard Grieg, Bach, Tchaikovsky, Mozart, and Beethoven

What was it like attending the Stonecoast Program MFA program and working too?

It was interesting. I think that a low-residency program is a much better approximation of what a writer’s life is going to be like upon matriculation than the traditional dedicated, full-time program. As a writer, we have to be masters of time management to keep our lives functioning while we are also running these odd side careers in the corners of the day.

Any advice for other writers about time management and juggling life, work, and writing?

White boards are very useful when you’re trying to keep organized. Also, technology can help a lot. I find Google Docs really useful, because I can access any file anywhere I happen to be, so I can be working a little if I’m sitting in a waiting area, or sitting in my office. Anywhere with Web access becomes the place I write my next thing.

I notice you regularly write sonnets and post them to your blog. Why sonnets?

Sonnets only pretend to be poems. They’re paragraphs, really, but prettier.

Who is your second favorite sonnet poet (after yourself)?

e.e. cummings.

What’s your writing environment like (your work area and tools of choice)?

I’m restless. My work environment will be whatever room or coffee shop or library I’ve set up in at the moment. Getting stagnant happens if I linger too much in one spot. I’m in a room that we’re calling my office, for now, but it’s more like a giant pile of books and art supplies next to a desk that happens to have the computer on it, today.

What have you read lately (in the last year or so) that you really liked?

I just finished Jerusalem by Alan Moore and it’s a breathtaking masterpiece that ought to win some awards, if folks are brave enough to soldier through it. It’s gorgeous, and wildly inventive, and tries to rewire what a narrative is and does, and I love that. It’s full of unforgettable lines, scenes, and ideas, like a massive feast of setting and theme.

Do you have any particular favorite books about writing?

I’ve read a few that I thought were okay, but only one stands out above the rest: Wonderbook by Jeff VanderMeer is the best of the bunch. It’s the textbook for the class you wish colleges offered. The inclusion of the visuals really enhances the text in surprising ways, and helps shift the notes of the text around in unexpected ways. Vandermeer is a modern master, and his erudition and cohesion and constant doubting on the subject of writing is immense.

What’s your favorite charity?

I often donate to the SFWA Emergency Medical Fund, because I am uniquely aware of how precarious American healthcare is, at the moment, for artists. I also regularly donate to the Catholic Church’s refugee work, and a local no-kill animal shelter, where I got my own wonderful pup who had been rescued and nursed to health off the local shelter’s kill list by this very charity: San Antonio Pets Alive!