Mining for Gold In Your Own Backyard

By Bex Hall

I’m not really certain why it took me so long to realize this, but I admit, somewhat ashamedly, that I have literally been sitting on a gold mine and didn’t have a clue.

For about eight months now I’ve been reaching out and networking with writers from afar. Participating in discussion lists and on message boards related to my book topic. My inbox is filled regularly with wonderful newsletters for writers that I devour upon arrival. I’ve been corresponding regularly with colleagues now who live thousands of miles away.

Then last month, I met a writer acquaintance while running errands. She told me about a local writing group that had an opening and asked if I’d be interested. After learning more about them, I applied, and was ultimately accepted.

The first meeting was an eye-opener, to say the least. Here I sat in a room with a local professor who had self-published a novel that was meeting with success. There was another woman who was shopping for an agent for her fiction manuscript, and yet another person who had been to the Iowa Writer’s Workshop. Which, from what I understand, is truly a Big Deal. I was humbled. The remainder of the group was comprised of writers who were at various stages in their journey for publication and honing their craft. I know I’m going to learn a great deal from our monthly meetings and interaction via the message board.

It was then that I began to wonder if there were others in our community who write or have been published. Google provided me with some interesting results. When I searched for “local, authors, published, [my city, my state]” I came across a gentleman who has been a freelancer since 1985. He’s written two dozen books, some that are well recognized, and his wife is an editor at our local newspaper. All I could do at that moment was pick my chin up from the floor and wonder aloud, “Here? In my little town?” I later shared this with my husband and he then proceeded to tell me that he had lived two doors down from the couple for seven years and that they were friendly people. I asked for an introduction.

I found the schedules of several other local authors who were doing book signings at, of all things (gasp), our local Borders bookstore. Sometimes I amaze even me at how obtuse I can be. My thirst for knowing more fueled my quest so I dug deeper. Apparently, our museum holds workshops for writers, I discovered. And to top it all off, our city holds an annual Festival of Books in November. I learned that last year our state capital, a mere hour long drive away, debuted a Book Fest event that was attended by over 7,000 people and that it’s being held again in October, complete with publishers, agents and nationally known authors. How could I have missed all of this?

I reason that it’s because I’m a writer first, marketer and networker, second. Better late than never, I rationalized. I also found that our state has an organization just for writers and I joined. They have an annual writing competition and while the deadline for entry was missed this year, I plan on participating next year as a new member. They’re holding a weekend workshop in June that’s designed to improve the craft, and my registration is already in the mail.

My search also revealed a seminar by Dan Poynter, the self-publishing industry guru, who was hosting the event only three hours from my backyard. I ventured forth for the day and met other published authors sitting in the audience. I also learned a very clever secret from one of the attendees about how to get reviews for your book cover. Well, it worked for him at least, and I’m sure going to give it a try.

It’s somewhat embarrassing to admit that I’ve been blind for so long to the goldmine in my own backyard. While it’s a good thing to network with those you may never physically meet, being face-to-face with other writers, editors, and publishers, I’ve learned, is priceless.

Not only for the encouragement and support one can receive, but also for the doors that can potentially be opened on a local basis. Developing these contacts and relationships will take time and effort, however, when the time comes to seek local paying freelance jobs or to promote the book once it’s published, the groundwork will have been laid.

Do you remember that commercial that went something like, ” . . . and they’ll tell two people, and then they’ll tell two people . . . “? If you happen to be in your late thirties, used a certain popular hair care product and you were concerned about others hating you because you were beautiful, then you may be familiar with it. If not, it exemplifies the concept of grassroots marketing and networking. Even though it may take time away from writing, it can ultimately lead to more opportunities to do so.

If you’re already out there in your own backyard, panning for nuggets, then kudos to you. If not, then get thee to thy favorite search engine and begin the rush. Who knows? You may even become richer from the experience.

Copyright © 2002 Bex Hall

Bex Hall is a published writer, a mother of two daughters and has remarried adding three stepchildren to the fold, all between the ages of 11 and 20. When she’s not busy applying to be on Jeopardy!, Bex spends her free time looking at life and watching what’s really going on amongst humanity. She then turns around and writes about it. In fact, her column appears weekly at Macon Area Online and on Bex Hall’s Website.